CRC Offline Canon | 2022 Open Wheel Championship Seasons

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Welcome to Cherokee Racing Community, the home of AI open wheel racing. Taking inspiration from Gran Turismo 5 B-Spec, as well as other NR2003 series such as TM Master Cup, CRC will be hosting the AT&T Champ Car World Series, Microsoft IndyCar Series, and Nissan Atlantic Championship for 2022. All three series present different styles, with Champ Car being the top tier Indycar World Championship, while IndyCar will be the second tier series, racing for the reformed National Championship, and the Atlantic Championship serving as the main developmental series, a blend of Indy Lights, and the European feeder system series such as Formula 2. Whether you want to be hands on with developing your teams and drivers, or sit and watch close racing with equal cars, or want to climb the North American open wheel ladder, there's guaranteed to be something for everyone. We hope you join us for another year of amazing "racing DnD".

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The 2022 AT&T Champ Car World Series season is the 22nd season of Indycar World Championship competition, sanctioned by the North American Motor Racing Association, and organized by Horizon Corporation since 2020. The premier races of the season are the 109th Indianapolis 500, Pepsi 500 at Pocono Raceway, and the Intel 500 at Auto Club Speedway, making up the 58th Firestone Triple Crown. [Insert name] enters the season as the defending Indycar World Champion, while Hazel Lacasse enters the season as the defending Indianapolis 500 Champion. [Insert team] enters the season as defending World Team's Champion, while [Insert OEM] enters as defending Champ Car Manufacturer's Champion.

The season marks the first for the new Andromeda CC02, an evolution of the previous chassis created by Andromeda Automotive Initiative which includes a change to the floor of the car as well as the addition of the aeroscreen, a device attached to prevent objects from entering the cockpit and injuring drivers. The series also was reduced to three engine suppliers for the full season, with Mercedes-Benz leaving to be a supplier for the National Championship. Alpine-Renault, Chevrolet, and Honda would carry on as full time OEMs, with all three companies signing multi-year deals to supply the series. Firestone would continue as the sole tire supplier for the series, signing a deal until 2030 that would make it the exclusive tire supplier for the entire North American open wheel ladder system.

2022 Champ Car Calendar.PNG

NOTE: Events in red are road course events, events in blue are oval events.

2022 Champ Car calendar changes​
  • The Coca-Cola 300 would be moved from Chicagoland to Kansas due to Chicagoland hosting a National Championship event for the Microsoft IndyCar Series beginning in 2022.
  • The second race in the European leg would be moved from the Automotodrom Brno to the Circuit de Nevers Magny-Cours in France as a manufacturer-supported event for Alpine-Renault.​
  • Kentucky Speedway would lose its Champ Car race in exchange for becoming an IndyCar host.​
  • North Carolina Speedway would finally join the Champ Car calendar after years of talks dating back to 2017.​
2022 Champ Car Roster Changes​
  • At the beginning of the 2021 season, Stephanie Porter-Kelley confirmed that 2021 would be her last season as a driver, moving into a strictly team owner role beginning in 2022. Porter-Kelley cited the deaths of Tim Kourting and Giuliano Ansaldi as the final motivation to retire once her driver contract expired in 2021.
  • On May 11, 2021, Phantom Motors announced it was being sold to Velocity Autosport at the end of the year, with Jean-Claude Gabriel announcing a prolonged battle with metastasized cancer that had forced the sale. Velocity Autosport's drivers, Maria Chavez and Katrina Ochoa, would be announced as filling the team's two full time seats in 2022, while Andrew Draco announced he would be stepping into a part time role with the team in an effort to win the Indy 500 and mentor the rookie drivers.​
  • In June 2021, Apex Racing Team and Escuderia Aguila were confirmed to be leaving the series to become the first official teams for the Microsoft IndyCar Series and the reformed Indycar National Championship, with Ronald Walker, Cody Blackman, and Cristine Espinoza all confirmed to retain their roles with the teams.
  • On June 28, 2021, Cat Devil announced it would be promoting Valerie Feng from the Nissan Atlantic Championship to compete alongside Kunimitsu Kino****a for the team in Champ Car.
  • On July 11, 2021, Red Bull Highlight Racing announced it would be switching to Chevrolet engines for 2022 with Mercedes leaving the series to supply the National Championship with engines.​
Champ Car Supplemental Regulations​
S.1.1. All GTPlanet members, as well as CRC Discord members, have the ability to enter an AI driver eligible to compete in a CRC Offline Series. These AI drivers enable the ability for people to race when they otherwise cannot compete in an competitive racing series.
S.1.1.1. Drivers who have not previously competed in the series between 2015 and 2021 can not perform as a full time driver in their first season unless they have a) finished in the top 10 in points in the Nissan Atlantic Championship once in the previous two seasons, b) completed a full season in the Microsoft IndyCar Series, or c) competed in a Champ Car season as a part-time driver.
S.1.1.2. AI Drivers competing in Champ Car or IndyCar must be at least 18 years old.
S.1.2. AI drivers must enable creativity in CRC. Parodying or trying to use a real life racing driver, living or deceased will not be acknowledged.
S.1.2.1. Using celebrities, living or deceased, or copyrighted fictional characters, currently being used or discontinued, will not be acknowledged or allowed by CRC.
S.1.2.2. AI drivers must have a realistic first and last name. Drivers must also originate from a realistic location. For example, SpongeBob Squarepants from Bikini Bottom is not acceptable.
S.1.3. AI drivers must have statistics entered for them to program how they behave on the race track. GTPlanet members can control how their drivers behave on track in various aspects through the attributes made available in the Driver Registration Form and through Attribute Upgrades
S.1.4. AI drivers can get injured or killed in crashes in CRC. In the instance that a driver is injured or killed, that AI driver's owner can make their own replacement, or another participant can have their AI driver called in as a substitution until the original AI driver is fit enough to return to action. (Please see section---)
S.1.4.1. In the instance that an injury is deemed appropriate, CRC and the GTPlanet member in question will determine in advance of the race being broadcast what those injuries may be and the time they will miss in the season.
S.1.5. CRC Members are permitted to reroll their drivers stats once through the lifespan of each driver. Once that driver has been revamped, those stats are locked in permanently.
S.1.6. Each CRC Member is permitted to control up to two drivers in the Champ Car World Series at any one time.
S.1.6.1. Those two drivers are not required to be on the same team.
S.1.7. Drivers will be responsible for negotiating their own salaries with teams if the situation arises. Driver salaries will dictate how much they can spend on driver-related upgrades every season. This solely applies to Champ Car competition.
S.2.1. Much of CRC's Offline Canon revolves around teams of AI drivers. CRC members, as well as GTPlanet members may register teams, run their own drivers, or hire other GTPlanet members' AI drivers to race for them throughout the season.
S.2.2. Teams, like the drivers, must be unique and original. Using names of racing teams that exist in real life is prohibited. Using the names of racing teams that previously existed, but are no longer operational, is also prohibited.
S.2.2.1. Team names must be within the acceptable limits of GTPlanet's Acceptable Use Policy.
S.2.3. Teams must first decide on which engine supplier they will use from.
S.2.3.1. For the NAMRA Champ Car World Series' 2022 season, engine suppliers are Alpine, Chevrolet, and Honda.
S.2.3.1.1. For teams competing in only the Triple Crown events at Indianapolis, Pocono, and Fontana, if they are competing in the National Championship, those engine suppliers are also permitted for use.
S.2.3.2. Firestone is the sole tire supplier of the North American Open Wheel Ladder.
S.2.3.3. Speedway is the exclusive fuel supplier of the series.
S.2.4. Teams must adhere to a financial plan and stay afloat and out of large debt. (See Section 4)
S.2.5. Teams are permitted to field up to three (3) full time entries, pending financially being capable of supporting those entries, in addition to up to two (2) Triple Crown entries.
S.2.5.1. Full time entries can be filled by a single AI driver, or up to an unlimited amount of rotational drivers.
S.2.5.2. Team fielding capabilities are also limited by the amount of space available. A total of 26 full time entries are available among all the teams, in addition to 16 Triple Crown entries maximum.
S.2.6. Teams will compete for a Team's Championship, where the team's best result from each event will count.
S.2.7. Beginning in 2022, smaller teams can align themselves with a powerhouse team to reduce upgrade costs.
S.2.7.1. Smaller teams will see a 20% cost reduction in General Upgrade Packages, while powerhouse teams will see a 10% cost reduction in all available car upgrades.
S.2.7.2. Only one smaller team can be affiliated with a powerhouse team, and both teams must run the same engine.
S.2.7.3. Smaller teams are defined as teams less than 3 years old or teams running one full time car or only part time.
S.2.8. Part time entries running exclusively in Champ Car are permitted to participate in up to 5 events.
S.2.8.1. Outside of the Triple Crown, only 28 cars maximum can participate in normal events, and the extra spaces are on first come, first serve basis.
S.2.9. New for the 2022 Champ Car season, CRC participants can create a backstory when they create a brand new team to the series.
S.2.9.1. Dependent on the backstory of the team and its owners, the team can either start as a minnow team and work up from being a part time team to move full time, or start out as a full time team if the series has the roster space for such a move.
S.2.9.2. Depending on the backstory, the team would start with a minimum of $5,000,000, but no more than $12,000,000.
S.2.10. Drivers in the series can also elect to start their own teams if they have earned at least $5,000,000 from prior competitive history in the series.
S.3.1. All paint schemes must first and foremost be in complience with GTPlanet's Acceptable Use Policy.
S.3.2. Driver surnames must be present on both sides of the cockpit, either on the foam headrest, on the side of the cockpit above the sidepod and aligned with the mirrors, or directly beneath the series logo under the roll bar.
S.3.3. National flags for each driver must be present on the roll hoop, on both sides, replacing the LED board.
S.3.4. Car numbers must be present on the nose of the car, the rear wing of the car on both end plates, and on the steering wheel inside the cockpit for identification.
S.3.5. A primary sponsor and up to 9 associate sponsors can be present on the car. Primary sponsors are exclusive to that driver and their team, whereas associate sponsors can be shared by any driver in the field as an associate sponsor only.
S.3.5.1. Rules regarding sponsor availability can be found more in depth in section---
S.3.5.2. Tobacco and political sponsors are completely prohibited.
S.3.5.3. Alcohol sponsors are limited to being affiliated to drivers 21 years of age or older.
S.3.6. Engine logos must appear on the nose of the car and on the engine cover or wheel guards.
S.3.7. Tire manufacturer logo must appear on the nose of the car and on the sidepod facing the front wheels.
S.3.8. The series logo must appear on the nose of the car.
S.3.9. If possible, team logos must appear on the nose of the car or on the sidepod.
S.3.10. Engine manufacturers cannot be sponsors of any kind. They already have contingencies on the car. Pick something else.
S.3.11. Itashas, "MLG" cars, and any ludicrous designs also will be discarded.
S.3.12. All sponsors on the cars must be either a) real life companies or b) on the approved list of sponsor selections.
S.3.13. For drivers new to the Indycar World Championship, the windscreen banner must be flourescent yellow to designate rookie status for first year drivers.
S.3.14. Entries competing in the full season are permitted in a primary and secondary livery, which can have different main sponsors not already taken by other teams or drivers.
S.3.14.1. Each team will have to make the determination as to which livery will run which event for each driver on their team.
S.3.14.2. Each livery made must be able to be run in both high downforce and low downforce specs to allow teams the ability to select races.
S.3.14.3. The designated primary livery must be used for at least 11 events of the season, with the secondary livery taking up the remainder.
S.3.14.4. Entries limited to running in one of, or all three, 500 Mile Triple Crown events are limited to a single livery for the low downforce aero kit.
S.3.14.5. Full time entries are permitted one special livery use for the Indianapolis 500. Special liveries outside of that event will cost teams $150,000 to run.
S.3.15. Sports teams and leagues are not permitted to be primary sponsors of any livery.
S.4.1. Each team is permitted to register up to five (5) sponsors for a season. Those sponsors appear on each entry the team fields for that season.
S.4.2. Each driver is permitted to register up to five (5) personal sponsors, as well. These sponsors appear only on the car of the driver being sponsored.
S.4.3. Each livery must have a main sponsor, with the remaining sponsors acting as associate or minor sponsors.
S.4.3.1. Each full time entry is permitted to have a primary sponsor, and secondary sponsor, with the primary sponsor being the main sponsor of a livery for at least 11 races, and the secondary sponsor being the main sponsor for the remainder.
S.4.4. Main sponsors pay $200,000 per race and per car they are sponsoring, for a total of $4,000,000 from main sponsorship being paid to the team.
S.4.4.1. Teams must submit a schedule of the liveries they want run for their full time cars, only if they are running two main sponsors.
S.4.4.2. If a sponsor is additionally an entitlement sponsor for the team (a part of the team's name), that sponsor will pay an additional $1,000,000 per full time car on the team. However, that entitlement sponsor must be a main sponsor for at least 8 races for each full time car being run.
S.4.5. Associate, or minor, sponsors pay $350,000 each during the pre-season period.
S.4.6. Sponsors listed as large or giant in the Approved Sponsor Document will have an objective, as well as a abandoning threshold. If a driver or team does well, the sponsor pays a bonus for achieving the objective. If a driver or team fails to perform at a certain level, the sponsor will leave the team at the end of the season.
S.4.6.1. If a driver loses a sponsor, they will lose a sponsorship slot until they finish top 13 in points or win a race.
S.4.6.2. If a team loses a sponsor, or if a team's drivers lose a combined two sponsors, that team will lose a sponsorship slot until they finish top 6 in Team Championship standings, or win a race and score a pole position in the same season.
S.4.6.3. Giant and large sponsors can only be lost, and only offer an objective bonus, if they are an entitlement, primary, or secondary sponsor for a team or driver.
S.4.7. Sponsors claimed as entitlement sponsors cannot be used by other teams.
S.4.8. Sponsors claimed as primary or secondary sponsors by teams can not be used by other teams.
S.4.9. Sponsors claimed as primary or secondary sponsors by drivers can not be used by other drivers in the series.
S.4.10. Sponsors claimed by teams in Champ Car are required to be carried across all open wheel series that team participates in. Entitlement sponsorship, however, only applies to the team in Champ Car.
S.5.1. The chassis used in the NAMRA AT&T Champ Car World Series is produced by Andromeda Automotive Initiative. The car will appropriately be cited as the Andromeda CC02.
S.5.1.1. The chassis will be capable of running three different aero kit designs; a maximum downforce aero kit for road and street courses, an intermediate downforce aero kit for short ovals, and a low downforce aero kit for superspeedway ovals.
S.5.1.2. The cost for a single Andromeda CC02 chassis is $500,000. This does not include the series approved aero kit, internal electronics, powertrain, or other additional parts.
S.5.1.2.1. If a car is rolled over, completely uses a wheel, or loses an entire section of the car, such as front nose assembly, the chassis must be replaced at the listed price.
S.5.1.3. Road course aero kits will have a cost of $120,000 per full set.
S.5.1.4. Short oval aero kits will have a cost of $100,000 per full set.
S.5.1.5. Low downforce aero kits will have a cost of $75,000 per full set.
S.5.1.7. Teams are required to have a minimum of two chassis, two sets of each aero kit required for their entries to compete in their designated events, as well as two transmissions, and electronic component sets for each chassis.
S.5.1.8. If parts of the front wing assembly is damaged, it can be replaced in halves, with the front and rear wings costing half of the aero kit's price.
S.5.2. Internal electronics for the chassis have a cost of $75,000.
S.5.2.1. If a car retires from a race due to an electrical failure, this must be replaced at the listed price.
S.5.3. Each car must be equipped with a Hewland transmission with six forward gears, as well as a neutral, and reverse gear. These transmissions cost $50,000.
S.5.3.1. If a car retires from a race due to a gearbox failure, the gearbox must be replaced at the listed price.
S.5.5. All teams must enter lease deals with the approved engine suppliers of the series.
S.5.5.1. Engine lease options can be seen in the table provided in T.2.6.
S.5.6. All teams competing in any part of the 2022 season must pay $1,000,000 per entry to exclusive tire supplier, Firestone.
S.5.7. All teams competing in any part of the 2022 season must pay $1,000,000 per entry to exclusive fuel supplier, Speedway, as well as an additional $100,000 per event for open access to fuel on site for all official sessions of the weekend.
S.5.8. Teams will be charged $500,000 at the beginning of each season for Headquarters Expenses, as well as $40,000 each race weekend of the season for each entry participating in the race.
S.6.1. Throughout the season, Champ Car teams are able to buy upgrades for all of their cars. These upgrades can be purchased in any order, and most can be bought twice for the same car, as long as they don't exceed the allotted spending limit.
S.6.2. Teams are limited to spending at maximum $8,000,000 per entry on car specific upgrades throughout the racing season.
S.6.3. Car upgrades have to be bought as a single use, per car item. Upgrades in this section cannot be bought once and affect more than one car in the same purchase.
S.6.3.1. Car upgrades can be installed on cars three races apart from each other. (Ex: A team buys an upgrade for Race 1. The next available opportunity to install another upgrade is Race 4.)
S.6.3.2. Car upgrades bought in pre-season testing does not alter the upgrade window for the beginning of the season.
S.6.4. Car upgrades can apply to one of three areas of the car; aerodynamics, which affects the car's downforce and ground effects; chassis, which affects tire wear, car balance, and driveability; and reliability, which lessens the chance of a mechanical failure with the car.
S.6.5. Each upgrade will place a certain amount of points into one of the three car areas. These points are divided by 2 and each half is placed in the maximum and minimum performance stats. (Ex: Each car starts with aerodynamic performance being set to a minimum of 40 and a maximum of 60. If an upgrade gives 20 points to aero, both the maximum and minimum gain +10)
S.6.5.1. If an upgrade assigns an uneven amount of points to an area, the half going to the maximum will get the extra points until the maximum stat reaches 100.
S.6.6. The following table is the full list of available car upgrades for the 2022 Champ Car season.
2022 Champ Car Upgrades.PNG
S.7.1. New to the 2022 Champ Car season, drivers will be able to purchase their own upgrades based on their salary per year.
S.7.2. Drivers are limited to spending up to either $300,000 or half of their yearly salary on driver upgrades, whichever limit is reached first.
S.7.2.1. Drivers are encouraged to negotiate their salaries with prospective teams to allow themselves the most room to adjust their performances.
S.7.3. Driver upgrades are available through training sessions, which are available for each of the driver stats; Aggression (Overtaking), Consistency, Finishing (Endurance/Stamina), Qualifying (Hotlapping), High downforce tracks, intermediate oval tracks, and high speed superspeedway tracks.
S.7.3.1. Short ovals and road courses have been combined into a single statistic due to how the road courses are coded to permit longer caution lengths.
S.7.4. Unlike with car upgrades, driver upgrades vary in how they are applied based on the area being upgraded.
S.7.4.1. Upgrades focused on track types are applied only to the minimum performance of a driver, as the maximum is already at 100. Rookie drivers have a default minimum of 60 points, while veteran drivers have a minimum of 70 points.
S.7.4.2. Upgrades focused on the aggression, consistency, finishing, or qualifying performances will apply to both the minimum and maximum, with the available points being split in half for each.
S.7.5. The following table are the available driver training seminars to purchase.
2022 Champ Car Driver Upgrades.PNG

S.7.6. Additionally, drivers are able to make a track type their specialty, which would give them a permanent 10 point boost to the track type chosen.
S.7.6.1. Drivers can only do this once, and even if a driver's stats are rerolled, the track specialty cannot be altered.
S.8.1. Garage and Pit Crew staff are able to be improved, without taking up space under the spending cap that applies to the cars themselves. These staff members apply boosts to all of the cars on the team without any delay.
S.8.2. Every year after the first that you retain staff, you get a 1.2x increase in the available boosts, with the retention boost reaching peak at a 2.0x increase.
S.8.3. Specialists will be available in six areas of expertise, both related to the car, as well as the pit crew.
S.8.3.1. Hiring an Aerodynamics Specialist will give teams a 10 point Aerodynamics boost on all of the team's cars through the entire season for a salary cost of $300,000 per year.
S.8.3.2. Hiring a Chassis Specialist will give teams a 6 point Chassis boost to all of the team's cars throughout the season for a salary cost of $200,000 per year.
S.8.3.3. Hiring an Efficiency Specialist will give teams a 20 point Reliability boost to all of the team's cars throughout the season for a salary cost of $300,000 per year.
S.8.3.4. Hiring a Powertrain Specialist will give teams a 5 point increase to the Engine's minimum performance window, for a yearly salary of $300,000.
S.8.3.5. Hiring a Chief Engineer will give teams a 40 point Pit Strategy boost to all of the team's cars throughout the season for a salary cost of $250,000 per year.
S.8.3.6. Hiring a Pit Crew Trainer will give teams a 40 point Pit Speed and Pit Consistency boost to all of the team's cars throughout the season for a salary cost of $250,000 per year.
S.8.3.7. All specialists are hired on a 1-year contract by default, and may be renewed or released at the end of each race season.
S.8.4. All Staff costs will be deducted as a whole when they are hired.
S.8.5. Unless stated otherwise, boosts received from staff are split in half and applied to both minimum and maximum performance windows.
S.9.1. In this section, a table provides a list of payouts from races and post season awards.
S.9.2. The Standard Race Purse column applies to races that are not held at the Circuit de Monte Carlo or Auto Club Speedway.
S.9.3. The Indy 500 Purse column outlines the race payout for the finishing order at the 108th Indianapolis 500 Mile Race
S.9.4. The Fontana/Pocono Purse column outlines the race payout for the finishing order at the Pepsi 500 Mile Race at Pocono, and the Intel 500 Mile Race at Fontana.
S.9.5. The Team's Championship Payout column details how much money is awarded based on the Champ Car Team's Championship at the end of the year. The top 10 full time teams will earn prize money for their position in the standings.
S.9.6. Additionally, awards for individual stats will be available on a per-season basis.
2022 Champ Car Purses.PNG
S.10.1. Points are awarded to each driver that starts a Championship race event based on finishing position and certain extra criterias.
S.10.2. Bonus points are awarded based on the following criteria.
S.10.2.1. Earning pole position for a race is worth 1 point.
S.10.2.2. Leading any lap during a race is worth 1 point.
S.10.2.3. Leading the most laps of all drivers during a race is worth 2 points.
S.10.3. The Indycar World Drivers Championship will score every driver's result across every race in the championship season.
S.10.4. The Indycar World Teams Championship will score the best result by each team across every race in the championship season, with pole positions being the only bonus points scored.
S.10.5. The Champ Car Manufacturer's Championship will score the top two (2) results scored by each manufacturer across every race of the championship season.
S.10.5.1. Each engine that fails during a race will deduct 10 points from the manufacturer in the points total.
S.10.6. The Champ Car Nation's Cup will score the best finisher from each nation represented by at least one driver in the championship season.
2022 Champ Car Points.PNG
S.11.1. All drivers competing in the AT&T Champ Car World Series, Microsoft IndyCar Series, or Nissan Atlantic Championship maintain the risk of being injured, killed, or aging out of competition.
S.11.2. If a driver is involved in a crash deemed serious enough to warrant injury or fatality, the member responsible for that driver will be notified by the series organizer, where they will discuss what the justifyable course of action should be.
S.11.2.1. A driver can be classified as inarguably expired if they are in an accident where the cockpit area is compromised by either another car, or a solid object large enough to do maximum damage.
S.11.2.2. If an autonomous driver, or a driver not controlled by a participating member, is involved in a serious accident, the series organizer will be the sole judge of appropriate status.
S.11.2.3. Members who have a driver created in their own image (ie: sharing real life name, personal details) are unable to be killed off, but can instead sustain career-ending injuries.
S.11.3. In addition to the driver expiration system, drivers can lose performance due to aging.
S.11.3.1. Drivers above the age of 40 will lose 5 points to their maximum performance windows across all track-specific stats.
S.11.3.2. Drivers above the age of 45 will lose 10 points to their maximum performance windows across all track-specific stats.
S.12.1. Each normal race event is composed of two free practice sessions on day 1 of the weekend, a qualifying session on day 2, while day 3 will have a 45 minute warm up session and then the race.
S.12.2. Each free practice session is 90 minutes in length.
S.12.3. Qualifying will vary between ovals, road and street courses, and the Triple Crown events.
S.12.3.1. Qualifying for normal oval events will require all entries to run on track alone, having an outlap, and four timed laps to set the fastest possible lap time. Entries are then arranged based on each entry's best lap time.
S.12.3.2. Qualifying on road and street courses will see all entries qualifying together in a three-stage knockout format. Q1 will determine positions 19-26. Q2 will determine positions 11-18 and Q3 will be the final session to determine the first five rows of the grid.
S.12.3.3. Qualifying for the Indianapolis 500 will see qualifying take place over two days. Day 1 will be Pole Day. The first four rows, or top 8 based on time at the end of the day, will be locked into their positions. Day 2 will be Bump Day. All of the non-secured entries from Pole Day will be required to run again, with positions 9-33 being determined.
S.12.3.4. Qualifying for the Triple Crown event at Pocono will see each entry make a single 4-lap qualifying run, with the field of 33 set based on the fastest 4 lap averages.
S.12.3.5. Qualifying for the Triple Crown event at Fontana will see each entry make a single qualifying run, with the field being split into two halves for two 120 mile heat races the night before the race.
S.12.3.5.1. The first heat race will be composed of all of the odd numbered qualifiers, with the top 17 finishers setting up the inside of each row in the order they finished.
S.12.3.5.2. The second heat race will be composed of all the even numbered qualifiers, with the top 16 finishers setting up the outside of each row in the order they finished.
S.12.3.6. Qualifying results are locked to entries, not drivers. If a team needs to replace a driver between qualifying and the race, the entry will remain in the field, but will be moved to the rear of the grid for the driver change.
S.12.3.7. Guaranteed starting places will not be granted to drivers at any point during the season.
S.12.4. Race event lengths will vary based on circuit type and importance to the calendar.
S.12.4.1. Road and street course events will follow the traditional Grand Prix race distance of 190 miles or 300 kilometers.
S.12.4.2. Events at ovals smaller than 1.25 miles in length will have race distances of 225 miles.
S.12.4.3. Events at ovals larger than 1.25 miles in length will have race distances of 300 miles.
S.12.4.4. Oval events designated as Triple Crown events will have race distances of 500 miles.
S.12.5. In the event that a race weekend has two races, the Friday of the race weekend will contain the free practice sessions, as normal. The rest of the event weekend will depend on how the event is structured.
S.12.5.1. If the doubleheader weekend is on a road or street course, Saturday will see the first race of the doubleheader held, with qualifying for that race happening 4 hours prior to the race start. The process will be repeated for the second race on Sunday.
S.12.5.2. If the doubleheader is being held on an oval, both races will be held on the same day, with the starting grid of the second race being determined by inverting the lead lap cars, with lapped down cars starting at the rear of the field.

Champ Car Technical Regulations​
T.1.1. The sole chassis sanctioned for use in the NAMRA AT&T Champ Car World Series is the Andromeda CC02, built solely by Andromeda Automotive Initiative, or AAI.
T.1.2. AAI will build three specifications of aerodynamic kits for competitive usage during the season, a high downforce kit for road and street courses, an intermediate downforce kit for short ovals, and a low downforce configuration kit for superspeedway oval races.
T.1.2.1. Intermediate kit usage will only apply to ovals less than 1.4 miles in length.
T.1.3. Each chassis automatically comes with brakes supplied by Brembo, however, teams may use brakes from a different supplier as they deem fit.
T.1.4. Each chassis is built to solely work with Hewland gearboxes, which contain 6 forward gears, a neutral, and reverse gear.
T.1.5. Each entry must run Firestone Firehawk tires, which will be supplied to teams at the beginning of each race weekend upon paddock entry.
T.1.6. Speedway fuel is the only permitted fuel source permitted for competition in the series within the United States. Outside of North America, Repsol is the sole fuel provider for race weekends.
T.1.7. Telemetry from each entry that runs in any Champ Car race weekend is collected by series officials for use by Horizon Corporation, NAMRA, FICA, Speedway, and Firestone however these parties deem fit.
T.1.8. Each chassis is equipped with a 70 liter (18.5 gallon) fuel cell that cannot be modified.
T.2.1. Officially permitted engine suppliers are permitted to supply entries with power units that conform with the limits of the regulations.
T.2.2. Official Equipment Manufacturers, or OEMs, are permitted to supply an engine with four, six, or eight cylinders.
T.2.2.1. Engines are permitted to be naturally aspirated, or complimented with up to two turbochargers. Superchargers and hybrid technology are prohibited.
T.2.2.3. Engines cannot exceed 800 brake horsepower, and cannot eclipse 12,500 revolutions per minute.
T.2.3. OEMs are required to provide the same powertrain to all entries they are in a lease contract to supply.
T.2.4. OEMs are permitted to make one upgrade to their powertrain during the season, an upgrade which must be supplied to all entries running under the OEM.
T.2.5. Recognized OEMs for the entire 2022 season are Alpine, Chevrolet, and Honda.
T.2.6. For detailed information regarding engine specifications, please see the insert below:
2022 OEMS.PNG

T.2.6.1. Permitted OEMs for the full Indycar World Championship campaign are Alpine, Chevrolet, and Honda. OEMs supplying the National Championship (Hyundai, Mercedes) will be permitted for use in the 500 mile races at Indianapolis, Pocono, and Fontana by teams not active in the World Championship.
T.3.1. Pit lane speeds and caution speed limits vary by track type, lap length, and width of pit lane.
T.3.2. Pit lane speed limits are unified based on track types, with street courses, road courses, short ovals, intermediate ovals, and superspeedways all having different pit lane speed limits.
T.3.2.1. Pit lane speed limits for street circuits and road courses are set to 37 miles per hour, or 60 kilometers per hour.
T.3.2.2. Pit lane speed limits for short ovals less than 1.4 miles in length are set to 40 miles per hour, or 64 kilometers per hour.
T.3.2.3. Pit lane speed limits for intermediate ovals, between 1.4 and 1.9 miles in length are set to 50 miles per hour, or 80 kilometers per hour.
T.3.2.4. Pit lane speed limits for superspeedways 2 miles in lap length or longer are set to 60 miles per hour, or 97 kilometers per hour.
T.3.3. Caution speeds have a variance based on track type, and track definitions, such as corners variety, and race lap speeds.
T.3.3.1. Caution speeds at road and street courses may vary from 40 miles per hour to 50 miles per hour.
T.3.3.2. Caution speeds at short ovals may vary from 45 to 50 miles per hour.
T.3.3.3. Caution speeds at intermediate ovals may vary from 55 to 65 miles per hour.
T.3.3.4. Caution speeds at superspeedways may vary from 65 to 85 miles per hour.
Default NR2003 Stats.PNG

IndyCar 2022 Logo Proposal 2.png

The 2022 Microsoft IndyCar Series will be the 86th season of Indycar National Championship competition, and the first since the 1999 season. Organized by the North American Motor Racing Association, it will act as the second tier of the American open wheel ladder system. The series, using the previous generation open wheel car produced by Andromeda Automotive Intitiative, is promised to provide close wheel-to-wheel racing by requiring each car in the series to use a spec chassis, as well as uniform suspension system, brake systems, and on board electronics, with the only difference coming from the engine suppliers in the series, Mercedes-Benz, and Hyundai, which will both provide a turbocharged V6 engine to its customers in the series.

The series will travel throughout North America exclusively, visiting Mexico and Canada in addition to the bulk of the calendar taking place within the continental United States. The series will visit predominantly ovals, albeit a variety of short ovals, intermediate ovals, and superspeedways, in addition to some road courses around the continent.

Due to the last season of the National Championship taking place in 1999, there is no defending National Champion participating in the 2022 season, as Rita Liechti, the 1999 champion, is now currently the managing director of Red Bull Highlight Racing. In addition to the National Championship, discipline specific awards will also be in place for the driver with the most points on road courses, as well as ovals.

2022 IndyCar Calendar.PNG
2022 Microsoft IndyCar Series Roster Moves​
  • In early May 2021, before the 108th Indianapolis 500, Hyundai confirmed it had signed a pre-contract with Cherokee GP for two engine leases for the 2022 IndyCar season. No further information was provided after that leak.
  • In late May 2021, Asumi Matsuo confirmed that Team Impulse would have a presence in IndyCar in 2022, with Matsuo intending on having her team in all four tiers of the North American open wheel ladder, including the grassroots Indy Development Series. Due to Alpine having a presence in Formula One against Mercedes, the team will be required to run Hyundai engines in IndyCar.
  • In early June 2021, Apex Racing Team was announced as being demoted from Champ Car after two consecutive years of poor performance and team mismanagement. The team would be moved to IndyCar, with Cody Blackman and Ronald Walker set to serve out the rest of their existing contract with the team in 2022.​
  • In late June 2021, Escuderia Aguila announced it would be moving from Champ Car to IndyCar, with the team withdrawing from the remainder of the 2021 season after Cristine Espinoza failed to qualify for the Pepsi 500 at Pocono Raceway.​
  • Striker Motorsports is rumored to have an IndyCar program in the works, according to financial releases by team sponsors EnergoPetrol and Alienware. How large the program is set to be is uncertain.​
Microsoft IndyCar Series Supplemental Regulations​
S.1.1. All GTPlanet members, as well as CRC Discord members, have the ability to enter an AI driver eligible to compete in a CRC Offline Series. These AI drivers enable the ability for people to race when they otherwise cannot compete in an competitive racing series.
S.1.1.1. Drivers who have not previously competed in Champ Car between 2015 and 2021 will be considered a rookie.
S.1.1.2. AI Drivers competing in Champ Car or IndyCar must be at least 18 years old.
S.1.2. AI drivers must enable creativity in CRC. Parodying or trying to use a real life racing driver, living or deceased will not be acknowledged.
S.1.2.1. Using celebrities, living or deceased, or copyrighted fictional characters, currently being used or discontinued, will not be acknowledged or allowed by CRC.
S.1.2.2. AI drivers must have a realistic first and last name. Drivers must also originate from a realistic location. For example, SpongeBob Squarepants from Bikini Bottom is not acceptable.
S.1.3. AI drivers must have statistics entered for them to program how they behave on the race track. GTPlanet members can control how their drivers behave on track in various aspects through the attributes made available in the Driver Registration Form and through Attribute Upgrades
S.1.4. AI drivers can get injured or killed in crashes in CRC. In the instance that a driver is injured or killed, that AI driver's owner can make their own replacement, or another participant can have their AI driver called in as a substitution until the original AI driver is fit enough to return to action. (Please see section---)
S.1.4.1. In the instance that an injury is deemed appropriate, CRC and the GTPlanet member in question will determine in advance of the race being broadcast what those injuries may be and the time they will miss in the season.
S.1.5. CRC Members are permitted to reroll their drivers stats once through the lifespan of each driver. Once that driver has been revamped, those stats are locked in permanently.
S.1.6. Each CRC Member is permitted to control only one driver in IndyCar at any given time.
S.2.1. Much of CRC's Offline Canon revolves around teams of AI drivers. CRC members, as well as GTPlanet members may register teams, run their own drivers, or hire other GTPlanet members' AI drivers to race for them throughout the season.
S.2.2. Teams, like the drivers, must be unique and original. Using names of racing teams that exist in real life is prohibited. Using the names of racing teams that previously existed, but are no longer operational, is also prohibited.
S.2.2.1. Team names must be within the acceptable limits of GTPlanet's Acceptable Use Policy.
S.2.3. Teams must first decide on which engine supplier they will use from.
S.2.3.1. For the NAMRA Microsoft IndyCar Series' 2022 season, engine suppliers are Hyundai and Mercedes.
S.2.3.2. Firestone is the sole tire supplier of the North American Open Wheel Ladder.
S.2.3.3. Speedway is the exclusive fuel supplier of the series.
S.2.4. Teams are permitted to field up to three (3) full time entries.
S.2.4.1. Full time entries can be filled by a single AI driver, or up to an unlimited amount of rotational drivers.
S.2.4.2. Team fielding capabilities are also limited by the amount of space available. A total of 26 full time entries are available among all the teams.
S.2.5. Teams will compete for a Team's Championship, where the team's best result from each event will count.
S.2.6. Part time entries running exclusively in Champ Car are permitted to participate in up to 5 events.
S.2.7. New for the 2022 Champ Car season, CRC participants can create a backstory when they create a brand new team to the series.
S.2.7.1. Dependent on the backstory of the team and its owners, the team can either start as a minnow team and work up from being a part time team to move full time, or start out as a full time team if the series has the roster space for such a move.
S.2.7.2. Depending on the backstory, the team would start with a minimum of $5,000,000, but no more than $12,000,000.
S.2.8. Drivers in the series can also elect to start their own teams if they have earned at least $5,000,000 from prior competitive history in the series.
S.3.1. All paint schemes must first and foremost be in complience with GTPlanet's Acceptable Use Policy.
S.3.2. Driver surnames must be present on both sides of the cockpit, either on the foam headrest, on the side of the cockpit above the sidepod and aligned with the mirrors, or directly beneath the series logo under the roll bar.
S.3.3. National flags for each driver must be present on the roll hoop, on both sides, replacing the LED board.
S.3.4. Car numbers must be present on the nose of the car, the rear wing of the car on both end plates, and on the steering wheel inside the cockpit for identification.
S.3.5. A primary sponsor and up to 9 associate sponsors can be present on the car. Primary sponsors are exclusive to that driver and their team, whereas associate sponsors can be shared by any driver in the field as an associate sponsor only.
S.3.5.1. Rules regarding sponsor availability can be found more in depth in section---
S.3.5.2. Tobacco and political sponsors are completely prohibited.
S.3.5.3. Alcohol sponsors are limited to being affiliated to drivers 21 years of age or older.
S.3.6. Engine logos must appear on the nose of the car and on the engine cover or wheel guards.
S.3.7. Tire manufacturer logo must appear on the nose of the car and on the sidepod facing the front wheels.
S.3.8. The series logo must appear on the nose of the car.
S.3.9. If possible, team logos must appear on the nose of the car or on the sidepod.
S.3.10. Engine manufacturers cannot be sponsors of any kind. They already have contingencies on the car. Pick something else.
S.3.11. Itashas, "MLG" cars, and any ludicrous designs also will be discarded.
S.3.12. All sponsors on the cars must be either a) real life companies or b) on the approved list of sponsor selections.
S.3.13. For drivers new to the Indycar National Championship, the side mirrors and TV camera must be flourescent yellow to designate rookie status for first year drivers.
S.3.14. Entries competing in the full season are permitted in a primary and secondary livery, which can have different main sponsors not already taken by other teams or drivers.
S.3.14.1. Each team will have to make the determination as to which livery will run which event for each driver on their team.
S.3.14.2. Each livery made must be able to be run in both high downforce and low downforce specs to allow teams the ability to select races.
S.3.14.3. The designated primary livery must be used for at least 11 events of the season, with the secondary livery taking up the remainder.
S.3.15. Sports teams and leagues are not permitted to be primary sponsors of any livery.
S.4.1. Each team is permitted to register up to five (5) sponsors for a season. Those sponsors appear on each entry the team fields for that season.
S.4.2. Each driver is permitted to register up to five (5) personal sponsors, as well. These sponsors appear only on the car of the driver being sponsored.
S.4.3. Each livery must have a main sponsor, with the remaining sponsors acting as associate or minor sponsors.
S.4.3.1. Each full time entry is permitted to have a primary sponsor, and secondary sponsor, with the primary sponsor being the main sponsor of a livery for at least 11 races, and the secondary sponsor being the main sponsor for the remainder.
S.4.4. Main sponsors pay $200,000 per race and per car they are sponsoring, for a total of $4,000,000 from main sponsorship being paid to the team.
S.4.4.1. Teams must submit a schedule of the liveries they want run for their full time cars, only if they are running two main sponsors.
S.4.4.2. If a sponsor is additionally an entitlement sponsor for the team (a part of the team's name), that sponsor will pay an additional $1,000,000 per full time car on the team. However, that entitlement sponsor must be a main sponsor for at least 8 races for each full time car being run.
S.4.5. Associate, or minor, sponsors pay $350,000 each during the pre-season period.
S.4.6. Sponsors listed as large or giant in the Approved Sponsor Document will have an objective, as well as a abandoning threshold. If a driver or team does well, the sponsor pays a bonus for achieving the objective. If a driver or team fails to perform at a certain level, the sponsor will leave the team at the end of the season.
S.4.6.1. If a driver loses a sponsor, they will lose a sponsorship slot until they finish top 13 in points or win a race.
S.4.6.2. If a team loses a sponsor, or if a team's drivers lose a combined two sponsors, that team will lose a sponsorship slot until they finish top 6 in Team Championship standings, or win a race and score a pole position in the same season.
S.4.6.3. Giant and large sponsors can only be lost, and only offer an objective bonus, if they are an entitlement, primary, or secondary sponsor for a team or driver.
S.4.7. Sponsors claimed as entitlement sponsors cannot be used by other teams.
S.4.8. Sponsors claimed as primary or secondary sponsors by teams can not be used by other teams.
S.4.9. Sponsors claimed as primary or secondary sponsors by drivers can not be used by other drivers in the series.
S.4.10. For the Microsoft IndyCar Series, the sponsorship system exists to a) allow players the ability to move up to Champ Car if they so choose, or b) prevent teams from dropping out of the series if they have no wish to move around.
S.5.1. Points are awarded to each driver that starts a Championship race event based on finishing position and certain extra criterias.
S.5.2. Bonus points are awarded based on the following criteria.
S.5.2.1. Earning pole position for a race is worth 1 point.
S.5.2.2. Leading any lap during a race is worth 1 point.
S.5.2.3. Leading the most laps of all drivers during a race is worth 2 points.
S.5.3. The Indycar National Drivers Championship will score every driver's result across every race in the championship season.
S.5.4. The Indycar National Teams Championship will score the best result by each team across every race in the championship season, with pole positions being the only bonus points scored.
S.5.5. The IndyCar Manufacturer's Championship will score the top two (2) results scored by each manufacturer across every race of the championship season.
S.5.5.1. Each engine that fails during a race will deduct 10 points from the manufacturer in the points total.
S.5.6. The IndyCar Nation's Cup will score the best finisher from each nation represented by at least one driver in the championship season.
2022 Champ Car Points.PNG
S.6.1. All drivers competing in the AT&T Champ Car World Series, Microsoft IndyCar Series, or Nissan Atlantic Championship maintain the risk of being injured, killed, or aging out of competition.
S.6.2. If a driver is involved in a crash deemed serious enough to warrant injury or fatality, the member responsible for that driver will be notified by the series organizer, where they will discuss what the justifyable course of action should be.
S.6.2.1. A driver can be classified as inarguably expired if they are in an accident where the cockpit area is compromised by either another car, or a solid object large enough to do maximum damage.
S.6.2.2. If an autonomous driver, or a driver not controlled by a participating member, is involved in a serious accident, the series organizer will be the sole judge of appropriate status.
S.6.2.3. Members who have a driver created in their own image (ie: sharing real life name, personal details) are unable to be killed off, but can instead sustain career-ending injuries.
S.6.3. In addition to the driver expiration system, drivers can lose performance due to aging.
S.6.3.1. Drivers above the age of 40 will lose 5 points to their maximum performance windows across all track-specific stats.
S.6.3.2. Drivers above the age of 45 will lose 10 points to their maximum performance windows across all track-specific stats.
S.7.1. Each normal race event is composed of two free practice sessions on day 1 of the weekend, a qualifying session on day 2, while day 3 will have a 45 minute warm up session and then the race.
S.7.2. Each free practice session is 90 minutes in length.
S.7.3. Qualifying will vary between ovals, and the road and street courses.
S.7.3.1. Qualifying for normal oval events will require all entries to run on track alone, having an outlap, and four timed laps to set the fastest possible lap time. Entries are then arranged based on each entry's best lap time.
S.7.3.2. Qualifying on road and street courses will see all entries qualifying together in a three-stage knockout format. Q1 will determine positions 19-26. Q2 will determine positions 11-18 and Q3 will be the final session to determine the first five rows of the grid.
S.7.3.3. Qualifying results are locked to entries, not drivers. If a team needs to replace a driver between qualifying and the race, the entry will remain in the field, but will be moved to the rear of the grid for the driver change.
S.7.4. Race event lengths will vary based on circuit type and importance to the calendar.
S.7.4.1. Road and street course events will follow the traditional Grand Prix race distance of 190 miles or 300 kilometers.
S.7.4.2. Events at ovals smaller than 1.25 miles in length will have race distances of 225 miles.
S.7.4.3. Events at ovals larger than 1.25 miles in length will have race distances of 300 miles.
S.7.4.4. Oval events designated as Triple Crown events will have race distances of 500 miles.
S.7.5. In the event that a race weekend has two races, the Friday of the race weekend will contain the free practice sessions, as normal. The rest of the event weekend will depend on how the event is structured.
S.7.5.1. If the doubleheader weekend is on a road or street course, Saturday will see the first race of the doubleheader held, with qualifying for that race happening 4 hours prior to the race start. The process will be repeated for the second race on Sunday.
S.7.5.2. If the doubleheader is being held on an oval, both races will be held on the same day, with the starting grid of the second race being determined by inverting the lead lap cars, with lapped down cars starting at the rear of the field.


Nissan Atlantic Championship logo.png
The 2022 Nissan Atlantic Championship season is the second season of the series' existence, with the series placed as the third tier in the North American open wheel racing ladder. The series, sanctioned by the North American Motor Racing Association, and organized by Horizon Corporation, is designed to give new drivers their first experiences with driving high speed American open wheel cars on road courses, and more importantly, ovals. Each team in the series is required to field two cars throughout the season, with every car using a naturally aspirated Nissan VK45DE 4.5 liter V8 engine, tuned to produce 600 brake horsepower. 13 teams took part in the inaugural 2021 season, while at least 15 teams are signed up to participate in 2022.

Changes to the Atlantic race format were ratified during the summer of 2021, disposing of the double header race weekend seen prominently in the European feeder systems, in favor of a more traditional American calendar of one race per event weekend. Additionally, Horizon Corporation confirmed that up to 21 teams would be permitted to join the series, giving as many teams and drivers a chance to enter the ladder system and develop before moving upwards.

2022 Atlantics Calendar.PNG

NOTE: Event dates in blue are support races for the AT&T Champ Car World Series. Event dates in blue are support races for the Microsoft IndyCar Series.
Nissan Atlantic Championship Supplemental Regulations​
S.1.1. All GTPlanet members, as well as CRC Discord members, have the ability to enter an AI driver eligible to compete in a CRC Offline Series. These AI drivers enable the ability for people to race when they otherwise cannot compete in an competitive racing series.
S.1.1.1. Drivers who have not previously competed in Champ Car between 2015 and 2021 will be considered a rookie.
S.1.1.2. AI Drivers competing in Champ Car or IndyCar must be at least 18 years old.
S.1.2. AI drivers must enable creativity in CRC. Parodying or trying to use a real life racing driver, living or deceased will not be acknowledged.
S.1.2.1. Using celebrities, living or deceased, or copyrighted fictional characters, currently being used or discontinued, will not be acknowledged or allowed by CRC.
S.1.2.2. AI drivers must have a realistic first and last name. Drivers must also originate from a realistic location. For example, SpongeBob Squarepants from Bikini Bottom is not acceptable.
S.1.3. AI drivers must have statistics entered for them to program how they behave on the race track. GTPlanet members can control how their drivers behave on track in various aspects through the attributes made available in the Driver Registration Form and through Attribute Upgrades
S.1.4. AI drivers can get injured or killed in crashes in CRC. In the instance that a driver is injured or killed, that AI driver's owner can make their own replacement, or another participant can have their AI driver called in as a substitution until the original AI driver is fit enough to return to action. (Please see section---)
S.1.4.1. In the instance that an injury is deemed appropriate, CRC and the GTPlanet member in question will determine in advance of the race being broadcast what those injuries may be and the time they will miss in the season.
S.1.5. CRC Members are permitted to reroll their drivers stats once through the lifespan of each driver. Once that driver has been revamped, those stats are locked in permanently.
S.1.6. Each CRC Member is permitted to control up to two drivers in the Atlantic Championship at any one time.
S.1.6.1. Those two drivers are not required to be on the same team.
S.2.1. Much of CRC's Offline Canon revolves around teams of AI drivers. CRC members, as well as GTPlanet members may register teams, run their own drivers, or hire other GTPlanet members' AI drivers to race for them throughout the season.
S.2.2. Teams, like the drivers, must be unique and original. Using names of racing teams that exist in real life is prohibited. Using the names of racing teams that previously existed, but are no longer operational, is also prohibited.
S.2.2.1. Team names must be within the acceptable limits of GTPlanet's Acceptable Use Policy.
S.2.3. All teams and drivers will use Nissan engines, with Firestone being the sole tire supplier of the series, and Speedway being the exclusive fuel supplier of the series.
S.2.4. Teams are required to run two cars for the entire season. The cars must be virtually identical aside from car number, and driver identification.
S.2.4.1. Entries can be filled by a single AI driver, or up to an unlimited amount of rotational drivers.
S.2.4.2. Up to 21 teams can be accepted into the Atlantic Championship.
S.2.5. Teams will compete for a Team's Championship, where both cars for that team will count towards the points total.
S.2.6. Finances are not heavily tracked in the Atlantic Championship, allowing teams to focus solely on driver performance.
S.3.1. All paint schemes must first and foremost be in complience with GTPlanet's Acceptable Use Policy.
S.3.2. Driver surnames must be present on both sides of the cockpit, either on the foam headrest, on the side of the cockpit above the sidepod and aligned with the mirrors, or directly beneath the series logo under the roll bar.
S.3.3. National flags for each driver must be present on the roll hoop, on both sides, replacing the LED board.
S.3.4. Car numbers must be present on the nose of the car, the rear wing of the car on both end plates, and on the steering wheel inside the cockpit for identification.
S.3.5. A primary sponsor and up to 4 associate sponsors can be present on the car. Primary sponsors are exclusive to that driver and their team, whereas associate sponsors can be shared by any driver in the field as an associate sponsor only.
S.3.5.1. Rules regarding sponsor availability can be found more in depth in section---
S.3.5.2. Tobacco and political sponsors are completely prohibited.
S.3.5.3. Alcohol sponsors are prohibited in the Atlantic Championship.
S.3.6. Engine logos must appear on the nose of the car and on the engine cover or wheel guards.
S.3.7. Tire manufacturer logo must appear on the nose of the car and on the sidepod facing the front wheels.
S.3.8. The series logo must appear on the nose of the car.
S.3.9. If possible, team logos must appear on the nose of the car or on the sidepod.
S.3.10. Engine manufacturers cannot be sponsors of any kind. They already have contingencies on the car. Pick something else.
S.3.11. Itashas, "MLG" cars, and any ludicrous designs also will be discarded.
S.3.12. All sponsors on the cars must be either a) real life companies or b) on the approved list of sponsor selections. (See post 2 for sponsor list.)
S.3.13. For drivers new to the Atlantic Championship, the side mirrors and TV camera must be flourescent yellow to designate rookie status for first year drivers.
S.3.14. Both cars for a team must run the same livery for the full season, with the only differences being driver number and other identification.
S.3.15. Sports teams and leagues are not permitted to be primary sponsors of any livery.
S.4.1. Each team is permitted to register up to five (5) sponsors for a season. Those sponsors appear on each entry the team fields for that season.
S.4.1.1. If a team is also present in Champ Car and/or IndyCar, the team's sponsors from those series will automatically carry over to Atlantic Championship competition.
S.4.2. Each livery must have a main sponsor, with the remaining sponsors acting as associate or minor sponsors.
S.4.2.1. Each full time entry is permitted to have a primary sponsor, and secondary sponsor, with the primary sponsor being the main sponsor of a livery for at least 11 races, and the secondary sponsor being the main sponsor for the remainder.
S.4.3. Sponsors claimed as primary or secondary sponsors by teams can not be used by other teams.
S.5.1. Points are awarded to each driver that starts a Championship race event based on finishing position and certain extra criterias.
S.5.2. Bonus points are awarded based on the following criteria.
S.5.2.1. Earning pole position for a race is worth 1 point.
S.5.2.2. Leading any lap during a race is worth 1 point.
S.5.2.3. Leading the most laps of all drivers during a race is worth 2 points.
S.5.3. The Atlantic Drivers Championship will score every driver's result across every race in the championship season.
S.5.4. The Atlantic Teams Championship will score the best result by each team across every race in the championship season, with pole positions being the only bonus points scored.
2022 Champ Car Points.PNG
S.6.1. All drivers competing in the AT&T Champ Car World Series, Microsoft IndyCar Series, or Nissan Atlantic Championship maintain the risk of being injured, killed, or aging out of competition.
S.6.2. If a driver is involved in a crash deemed serious enough to warrant injury or fatality, the member responsible for that driver will be notified by the series organizer, where they will discuss what the justifyable course of action should be.
S.6.2.1. A driver can be classified as inarguably expired if they are in an accident where the cockpit area is compromised by either another car, or a solid object large enough to do maximum damage.
S.6.2.2. If an autonomous driver, or a driver not controlled by a participating member, is involved in a serious accident, the series organizer will be the sole judge of appropriate status.
S.6.2.3. Members who have a driver created in their own image (ie: sharing real life name, personal details) are unable to be killed off, but can instead sustain career-ending injuries.
S.6.3. In addition to the driver expiration system, drivers can lose performance due to aging.
S.6.3.1. Drivers above the age of 40 will lose 5 points to their maximum performance windows across all track-specific stats.
S.6.3.2. Drivers above the age of 45 will lose 10 points to their maximum performance windows across all track-specific stats.
S.7.1. Each normal race event is composed of two free practice sessions on day 1 of the weekend, with day 2 featuring qualifying and the race.
S.7.2. Each free practice session is 90 minutes in length.
S.7.3. Qualifying will be the same for every race of the season.
S.7.3.1. Qualifying will be a single 30 minute session, where all cars will have access to the track as they choose to set the fastest lap time they can.
S.7.3.2. Qualifying results are locked to entries, not drivers. If a team needs to replace a driver between qualifying and the race, the entry will remain in the field, but will be moved to the rear of the grid for the driver change.
S.7.4. Race event lengths will vary based on circuit type and importance to the calendar.
S.7.4.1. Road and street course events will be half the traditional Grand Prix race distance, resulting in 95 mile/150 kilometer races.
S.7.4.2. Events at ovals smaller than 1.25 miles in length will have race distances of 100 miles.
S.7.4.3. Events at ovals larger than 1.25 miles in length will have race distances of 150 miles.
S.7.4.4. Oval events designated as Triple Crown events will have race distances of 250 miles.
S.7.5. In the event that a race weekend has two races, the Friday of the race weekend will contain the free practice sessions, as normal. The rest of the event weekend will depend on how the event is structured.
S.7.5.1. If the doubleheader weekend is on a road or street course, Saturday will see the first race of the doubleheader held, with qualifying for that race happening 4 hours prior to the race start. The process will be repeated for the second race on Sunday.
S.7.5.2. If the doubleheader is being held on an oval, both races will be held on the same day, with the starting grid of the second race being determined by inverting the lead lap cars, with lapped down cars starting at the rear of the field.


To set up driver ratings to take part in any of CRC's open wheel championships, use this link from Google Docs.
Access to the Champ Car, IndyCar, and Atlantic Championship templates will be made available through Mediafire before the end of July.
Feel free to join CRC's community Discord here. Not a requirement to take part in the offline canon.
Watch Champ Car races live via Twitch, or on demand on YouTube!
 
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News Recap for the week of August 8-14, 2021.

Kyoto, Japan | CRC Network | 8/9/2021 | Cat Devil Racing confirmed on Monday that it would be going different ways in 2022, confirming that it would not be resigning Diego Jaramillo or Camyron Jackson beyond 2021. For Jaramillo, it allows the Spaniard to become a factory Honda driver elsewhere, with many believing he will end up driving for the marque in Formula Zero, the green-energy open wheel series currently exclusively running on street circuits. The bigger shock was the team going separate ways with Camyron Jackson. Jackson had been with CDR the same length of time as Kuni Kino****a, both debuting for the team in the 2015 Indianapolis 500, where Kino****a won. That race was credited by the team as saving it from bankrupcy, allowing it to flourish in ways since that win. But while Kino****a has been able to establish herself as a consistent top 10 threat, the same couldn't be said for Jackson, who, despite improving performances since the beginning of 2020, has not been able to meet the same results. With the team confirming that Valerie Feng would be coming up from the Atlantic Championship to race alongside Kino****a, Jackson and Jaramillo were both notified that there would not be negotiations regarding a future with the team.

The team, however, did extend an olive branch to Jackson. In a rare instance of good faith, Cat Devil Racing have given Jackson one of their full time entries to secure his place in the 2022 grid, reducing their team to just Kino****a and Feng for next year, while also ensuring another team on the grid uses Honda engines.

The writing was on the wall, some believe, and it reached a fever pitch during the Pocono race weekend. The team had announced Valerie Feng being called up the morning of qualifying, only to have an abysmal qualifying performance, which saw Camyron Jackson fail to qualify for a premier level racing event for the first time in his career, while Feng qualified highest of the four CDR cars. Team directors, sources have pointed out, looked to quickly isolate Kino****a, and Feng, as their next big pairing, while Honda worked to secure Jaramillo's services outside of Champ Car before his stock potentially lowered. It left Jackson as the odd man out in a very quickly evolving state of affairs, and with the team sending him on his way with a guaranteed full season entry, it's now on Jackson to make something happen for next season.
Indianapolis, Indiana, United States | ABN Sports | 8/13/2021 | Team Impulse's presence will now expand across all three tiers of both American open wheel racing and Japanese open wheel racing. The team announced on Friday, August 13th, that it would be competing in a full time capacity in the Microsoft IndyCar Series, the new second tier of the American open wheel ladder, and the revived National Championship. Team Impulse secured the services of Thomas Rogers, who raced from the team from 2018 to 2020, to help launch the team's efforts in the new cost-effective, equal-footing series, and he'll be paired with Jake Carter, who will make his open wheel debut in the series in 2022. The team also registered the #6 for use in IndyCar, like what it has run in Champ Car, though a third driver has not yet been announced.

Importantly, both Rogers and Carter will fill the team's ambitions for the Firestone Triple Crown in 2022. The duo will team up with the full time Champ Car drivers, Hazel Lacasse, Sakura Ishibashi, and B.K. Glover, as the team prepares a 5-car armada to defend their dominant Indy 500 performance from earlier this year. Rogers has made 6 prior Indy 500 starts, dating back to 2014, while Carter will be a genuine Indy 500 rookie when May 2022 rolls around.

The team also dissected its management of its operations, with all of its American operations taking place in different locations. Team Impulse's Champ Car efforts are largely run out of the team's headquarters in Osaka, Japan, alongside the team's entire Japanese racing efforts covering the GP1 Championship, GP2 Championship, and GP3 Championship, and they have a small transport hub in Kansas City to help the Champ Car effort manage quick turnaround trips between races. Conversely, the team's new IndyCar program will be housed in a brand new facility just outside of Indianapolis, while the team's Atlantic Championship efforts continue to run from a base in Buffalo, New York. It creates a sharp contrast between how it manages its championship pursuits in comparison to its nearest rivals, most of which on the American side use the same hub for all of its open wheel activities.
Cherokee, North Carolina, United States | CRC Network | 8/13/2021 | Cherokee GP have found their replacement to the outgoing Katrina Ochoa for the 2022 Nissan Atlantic Championship season. Santiago Saetilla will join the team's developmental roster alongside Julia Takani for next year. Saetilla, from Panama City, Panama, has spent 2021 running a partial season in the continental South American Formula Three Championship, in addition to a full season campaign in the Argentinian Formula Three Championship. The 19 year old was secretly tipped to be a potential replacement for Cristine Espinoza for when she decides to eventually retire from full time competition for Escuderia Aguila, but Cherokee GP pulled the trigger first to secure the services of the rapid Panamanian.

"To be moving to the United States, it will be an incredible experience to learn and take everything in." Saetilla commented. "Cherokee GP have trusted me to jump in and begin that process next year, and I'm excited to finish the year and begin working with them."

"Santiago has shown some incredible talent in Argentina and in South America as a whole." Clayton Hardy said of Saetilla. "He has an unwavering bravery, the way he attacks every lap, and the pace he shows, regardless of how much prep time he gets, is remarkable. He's a race winner in Formula Three for a reason. There's talent and skill there. I'm excited to have him on board, and I think fans will come to appreciate what Santiago will bring to the track next year."
 
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News recap for the week of August 15-21, 2021.


Miami, Florida, United States | ABN Sports | 8/16/2021 | One of Champ Car's more persistent minnow teams is getting a significant boost and revitalization after the 2021 season ends. Eastern Atlantic Motorsports, one of Champ Car's two Miami-based teams, will become Dragon Motorsports after a deal was struck with Camyron Jackson, which will make Jackson a majority owner of the team, while Richard Hoffson retains a 40% stake in the team to look over his daughter, Esther, as her career continues. Fine details of the transaction have not been disclosed, and likely won't be, but it was suggested in the introductory press conference that this had been in the works since before Pocono. HPD, the American division of Honda, also had a hand in making the deal happen, making a deal with Cat Devil Racing to allow Jackson to have their empty third car in exchange for reduced engine lease prices next year.

For the series as a whole, the news comes as a win-win. Honda gets a new powerhouse effort on the heels of Phantom Motors being sold, and also gets a three car team to compete against Team Impulse, Swift Autosport, and Striker Motorsports next year. For the Eastern Atlantic team, it's job security, an influx of money, and a fresh start, and for Camyron Jackson, a potentially massive upgrade on the heels of leaving his former team of 7 years in Cat Devil Racing.

The biggest question for Dragon Motorsports now will be who occupies the third seat. Camyron Jackson and Esther Hoffson were both present for the press conference today, but Patrick Marcelli, the other current Eastern Atlantic driver, was not. Marcelli had been vocal in Italian media that he was dissatisfied with the current climate in the team, accusing the team of putting its better assets around the younger Hoffson, something refuted by Richard Hoffson himself in a media scrum after Motegi. On the heels of the announcement that the team would be overhauled, Marcelli announced that he would be retiring at the end of the season, citing his desire to "do something else after years of running in secondhand equipment". Sources close to the situation in Miami have reported that a third driver had already been signed, but certain paperwork needed to be finished before the announcement could be made, hinting that the driver is coming from outside of North America. As such, it also means we won't have to wait long to know who the third driver will be.
Osaka, Japan | CRC Network | 8/17/2021 | Team Impulse signed off on almost the rest of its 2022 roster earlier today, with its wide reach now having completed lineups across the U.S., Japan, and Europe. In the U.S. the team is competing in all three series in the American open wheel ladder. In the AT&T Champ Car World Series, its full time lineup will be composed of Hazel Lacasse, who resigned with the team in a 3 year, $9M+ deal, along with Sakura Ishibashi, who will enter 2022 as a contract year, and B.K. Glover, who returns to full time Champ Car competition after a year as a driver coach for their Atlantics team. In the Microsoft IndyCar Series, the team has filled two of its three seats for next season already, with Thomas Rogers and Jake Carter announced last week to drive the #2 and #3 in the series. Their #6 is still unfilled as of the time of writing. And in the Nissan Atlantic Championship, the team has signed Saori Tokui to pair alongside Artyom Kozlov. Tokui will be coming from Japan, where she raced for the team in the GP3 Championship in Japan.
Orlando, Florida, United States | TNT Sports | 8/20/2021 | Striker Motorsports has unveiled that another fresh face will be joining the team in 2022. Lucien Lachapelle, the French driver who joined in the middle of last season, will be returning to Europe at the end of the year to return to Formula 2. This development has forced Striker's hand in terms of managing its junior driver program. With team owner, Stephanie Porter-Kelley, also retiring as a driver at the end of the year, two vacancies exist on the team's Champ Car roster. As a result, the team will be promoting Elise Alexander from the Nissan Atlantic Championship to drive the renumbered #11, the same number her father Michael drove to his Indycar World Championship in 2006. GEICO, who sponsored Michael his entire career until his untimely death in 2007, will also sponsor Elise once she steps up to Champ Car competition.

Striker has also been very busy preparing for the Microsoft IndyCar Series and Nissan Atlantic Championship for next year. The team has signed Black Rose Racing developmental driver, Katarina Milenkovic, to drive the number #60, and American rookie, Nick Hugh to drive the #40 in IndyCar next year. Sponsors are currently unknown, but expected to be in a similar vein to the team's Champ Car engagements. With Milenkovic, who has raced the 2021 Atlantic Championship season with Black Rose Racing, in addition to starting the Champ Car events at Pocono and Fontana at the end of the season, Striker has a promising young driver, the Neum, Bosnia native has impressed several throughout the season. Nick Hugh, on the other hand, is an unknown quantity, but with Striker, driver development will be crucial.

Development remains the theme when talking about the Nissan Atlantic Championship. With Alexander called up, the team revealed it was unable to resign Natalia Vulicevic, indicating the Slovenian driver is headed elsewhere in 2022. In their place is a brand new duo for 2022. Dale Blanco will be joining forces with David Germain Jr. as teammates. Germain, the son of 2002 Indycar World Champion, David Germain, and current Formula 1 driver, Oliver Germain, will bring the Germain family name back to American open wheel racing for the first time since 2014. Blanco, who comes from the Indy Development League, will step up to the third tier of American open wheel racing.