Do the wealthy, the businesses, abandon rioting, virus infected and indebted cities?

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Dotini

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I'm seriously concerned about the continued economic viability of my city, Seattle. It is very deeply in debt, with aging bridges, rampant homelessness, rapidly rising taxes and much public discontent. Downtown was trashed Saturday with over 100 top line businesses looted and dozens of cars burned. I'm concerned the major businesses will not return, as they do not need to do so with remote working and continued security concerns. The riots will persist at least through the coming weekend, and perhaps throughout the summer. Coronavirus and social distancing make living here in the traditional way out of the question. The virtues and benefits are lost as the miseries multiple. In my neighborhood, people must watch their step to avoid human feces and used needles.

I am taking steps to sell my million dollar home in a desirable part of town and move to a secluded, safer suburb with lower taxes.

This same problem applies to many major cities, such as Chicago, New York City, San Francisco and others.

I will post reports on this situation as I come across them.

Please discuss the issues pro and con.

https://wbbm780.radio.com/articles/mayor-lightfoot-pleads-with-walmart-to-not-abandon-chicago
 
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13,677
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lImaRobotl
Well maybe if you didn't have such an expensive home in the first place and put your money into the economy instead?
You can do both ;), and building and furnishing the million dollar home puts money back into the economy.
Not only that, but living in cities like Seattle, I'm sure its very easy for house' to be quite up there in price. Kind of ridiculous thing to say in the first place.

My mom's house is 600k-700k and its really nothing extraordinary.
 
8,735
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Well maybe if you didn't have such an expensive home in the first place and put your money into the economy instead?

Pretty sure he paid significantly less than that. I'm not sure how property taxes work in Washington state, but he's paying taxes on that property. To add to what others are saying, a $1M home on the west coast is like the equivalent of a nice Toyota Camry. It will be decent but certainly not fancy/extravagant.

I think it's reasonable to expect cities to decline again at some point - it's a cyclical thing. However, it's difficult to say how much they would decline, if they do. San Francisco, even in it's darkest period in the 1980s, was still a functioning and vibrant city. Pacific Heights & Sea Cliff never got abandoned, and they never will.

To repeat, I think you are being overly dramatic. (@Dotini)
 
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Joey D

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Well maybe if you didn't have such an expensive home in the first place and put your money into the economy instead?

A million-dollar home isn't much in Seattle. This home is over 100 years old and is 1,600 sq ft, it's listed at just a tick short of a million. Depending on where his house is, it could be a dump and still be a million dollars.

I'm concerned the major businesses will not return,

Seattle has one of the fastest-growing populations in the nation. People aren't moving there for giggles and grins, they're doing it because there are jobs.
 

Dotini

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@Joey D
Deep layoffs and buyouts are taking place at Boeing.

Microsoft has been laying off for years and they continue.
 

Dotini

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The exodus of the wealthy from cities reveals the problems with individualism
April 1, 2020



Being Human

We’ve never been as connected, or as isolated.

New York’s gilded Upper East Side has been rendered a ghost town. The tourists are at home; the shops are shuttered, with their shelves bereft. Many of its residents, meanwhile, are as far away from the new center of a global pandemic as their wealth can take them—in the country, by the shore, on a hilltop, virtually anywhere else.

It’s the same story all over the world: The wealthy are experiencing coronavirus differently. Some have gone to their second or third homes or to visit family members in more remote locations. (In the interests of full transparency, I have spent the past two weeks staying with my mother at her home in rural Connecticut.) Others have paid thousands for short-term rentals: In France and the UK, sleepy country towns are overrun with weekenders hunkering down for the long haul, while entire hotels in Ireland have been bought out by families fleeing cities. In the US, Airbnb saw year-on-year revenue in rural areas increased by $280 million in March 2020, or almost 30%, while revenue in urban areas fell by $75 million, according to data from AirDNA. In the same period, bookings in Manhattan and New Jersey fell by 66%, while bookings in some Cape Cod towns have soared by as much as 600%.

Fleeing the pandemic outside the door
The reasons to get out of the city are fairly straightforward. Social distancing in New York or Paris may mean committing to weeks or months inside an apartment of a few hundred square feet, in the knowledge that a global pandemic lies just beyond your front door. Heading for the hills, meanwhile, should mean peace and quiet, more outside space, and the opportunity to opt out of the city’s plague by being in the country, like so many wealthy Europeans during the Renaissance.
 

Danoff

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Well maybe if you didn't have such an expensive home in the first place and put your money into the economy instead?

This is an often repeated notion and it's really quite misguided. There's no place to store wealth that is not "in the economy" in some form or another. Owning stock, for example, is no more or less "in the economy" than owning real-estate. Or perhaps the argument is against savings altogether.
 
8,735
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This is an often repeated notion and it's really quite misguided. There's no place to store wealth that is not "in the economy" in some form or another. Owning stock, for example, is no more or less "in the economy" than owning real-estate. Or perhaps the argument is against savings altogether.

I think the notion that all wealth is equally productive is also misguided.
 

Dotini

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The great exodus out of America’s blue cities
BY KRISTIN TATE, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR — 04/24/18 09:30 AM EDT 7,016
THE VIEWS EXPRESSED BY CONTRIBUTORS ARE THEIR OWN AND NOT THE VIEW OF THE HILL

Am I the only one in my spinning class at Equinox in Manhattan who’s fed up paying $200 every month for a gym with clean showers, $3,000 in rent every month for an apartment without cockroaches and $8 every morning for a cup of coffee? Am I the only one moving through the greater part of New York City boroughs and seeing an inexorable march of urban decay matched with the discomfort of crowding and inexplicable costs? I know I am not.

New York is the most expensive city in America. Its lower-cost neighborhoods are riddled with crime and homelessness. Its public schools, some of which are among the worst in the nation, look more like prisons than places of learning.


With between up to 50 percent of their paycheck going to a combination of federal, local and city taxes, not including other consumer taxes baked into every aspect of their consumer practices, residents don’t even have the comfort of knowing that their tax expenditures are going to the improvement of their lives in the city. New York infamously misuses the hard-earned tax revenues of its citizens in ways that scarcely benefit them.
Eventually, city and state taxes, fees, and regulations become so burdensome that people and corporations jump ship. More people are currently fleeing New York than any other metropolitan area in the nation. More than 1 million people have moved out of the New York City metro area since 2010 in search of greener pastures, which amounts to a negative net migration rate of 4.4 percent.
https://thehill.com/opinion/finance/384536-the-great-exodus-out-of-americas-blue-cities
 

Danoff

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I think the notion that all wealth is equally productive is also misguided.

That's true, though I'm not sure who is thinking that. For example, Elon Musk is doing a lot with his, especially compared to his contemporaries. Similarly, even within my own accounts, some of it is producing more than others of it. Though there is utility even in money which is sitting in cash (which is still doing something).

For example, let's take a hypothetical. Let's suppose that I have some cash sitting in a 401k. Useless right? It's not doing jack. But if that cash gives me the piece of mind to take other funds and put them into use, because I have a nest egg of cash in my 401k, then the cash is enabling the use of (productivity of) other money. So what value is there in holding stock? What is the wealth that is tied up in the stock producing? Arguably nothing. It doesn't go to the company to enable them to operate (that was IPO). It doesn't get loaned out to anyone. It just sits, waiting to be traded. There is some utility in it for buying a vote in the company's affairs, or for preventing a takeover, or for taking over, or for providing feedback through stock price regarding a company's policies, but in some ways wealth in stock is less productive than wealth in housing.
 

Dotini

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Our cities only serve the wealthy. Coronavirus could change that
David Madden


Urban spaces have always catered to the needs of the elite but the community reaction to the pandemic shows it doesn’t have to be this way

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‘Primarily working-class boroughs in extremely unequal cities – such as Newham in London [pictured] – have been hit especially hard by coronavirus.’ Photograph: Ben Stansall/AFP via Getty Images
Published onTue 2 Jun 2020 08.17 EDT

Until recently, many experts prophesied an urban future. The pandemic has made that future far less clear. Coronavirus has caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of urban residents. Wealthy second-homeowners and migrant labourers alike have fled to the countryside. In US cities, meanwhile, the largest anti-racist uprisingsin a generation have been met by shocking levels of official violence and cruelty. These twin emergencies – novel coronavirus and racist state violence – have highlighted the brutality of contemporary urban inequality.

commentators believe there will be a mass exodus from cities, a trend accelerated by home working, and that large, dense cities are no longer viable. Other urbanistshave argued that city living can be redeemed by small changes to existing cityscapes, such as pedestrianising streets, altering zoning codes or rolling out new “smart city” technologies.

Both of these positions are off the mark. Rather than asking if cities will continue to exist, we should ask, in light of the pandemic, who and what cities are for.

There is no simple relationship between urbanisation and infectious disease. Researchers have traced how interactions at urban-rural peripheries create new vulnerabilities to disease. But a study published in 2017 that looked at 60 countries found that, overall, infectious disease burdens decreased with urbanisation. While epidemics have periodically devastated poor and marginalised urban communities, cities have also spawned new health policies, housing reforms and social movements that help people fight and survive disease.

Much of the anxiety about cities during the coronavirus pandemic has centred on fears that population density might heighten the risk of contagion. But density and crowding are not the same thing. Overcrowding is the result of inequality and the housing crisis, not an unchangeable feature of urban life.

If forecasting the end of urbanisation is a distraction, then the opposite argument – that cities can carry on as before, just with more open-air dining options – is equally misjudged. Both the pandemic and the battles being waged within US cities have exposed an inescapable fact about urban life: privatised, financialised, highly unequal cities do not work for most of their inhabitants. Cities still have a future, but the specific kind of city that has become globally dominant today shouldn’t have a place in it.

In places like London and New York, the development model over the past few decades has catered to the needs of elite individuals, powerful corporations and wealthy investors. These cities have been inundated with luxury housing, expensive office buildings, new business districts, amenities for the so-called “creative class” and aspirational High Line-style park areas. Urban space has been optimised for rent extraction, real estate speculation and gentrification. Governments have pursued private sector profitability and deferred to middle-class tastes, and have been lauded by urbanists for doing so – all while allowing the deterioration of social services and public institutions and the intensification of inequality.

Even before the pandemic, this paradigm was a disaster. A set of intersecting crises has made urban life increasingly difficult for all but the wealthy. Housing has become unaffordable and insecure. Work has become casualised and wages have stagnated, leaving many workers unable to sustain an adequate standard of living. Despite pretensions towards multiculturalism, a white power structure has maintained racialised inequalities in nearly all aspects of economic and political life, including housing, health and policing.

It’s this urban model that has proved highly vulnerable to the Covid-19 pandemic. Poorly paid but essential workers such as nurses and supermarket workers have been priced out of central districts, placing key economic and social sectors in jeopardy. Self-isolation is impossible in overcrowded housing, which has fuelled the spread of the virus. Poor and marginalised areas are disproportionately affected by air pollution, which has translated into higher mortality rates in low-income communities of colour.

For many working-class city dwellers, the cost and precarity of everyday life has made quarantining a luxury they can ill afford. Hence primarily working-class boroughs in extremely unequal cities – such as Newham in London and the Bronx in New York – have been hit especially hard by coronavirus. Dispossessed and exploited urban communities suffered in previous epidemics, and they’re bearing the brunt of the current one.

If the pandemic is a stress test for the cities shaped by and for financialised capitalism, it’s one they’re failing miserably. But none of this is inherent to city life. It’s the result of political and economic arrangements that can, with sufficient political pressure, be altered.

Cities do need to radically change – but not in the ways being promoted either by density sceptics or professional urbanists. Instead, they must become more egalitarian, more democratic, and more capable of meeting actual human needs. Urban development should focus on the provision of social welfare, health infrastructure, municipal services, decarbonised public transportation, real racial equality and guaranteed housing for all. The only solution to the urban crises we face is to establish a new direction for cities that reverses the inequities this pandemic has exposed.

Emergency responses to coronavirus have shown that rapid change is possible. In neighbourhoods across the world, mutual aid networks have sprung up to coordinate everything from grocery shopping to rent strikes. Some cities acted swiftly to house the homeless, halt evictions, adjust traffic patterns and provide necessary health care. The reaction to the pandemic shows that the structures sustaining the unequal city are movable – and can be altered faster than had been assumed.


As cities begin to change in response to the pandemic, it’s crucial that they don’t return to their previous trajectory. The real threat is not that urban life will disappear, but that the inequality and injustice of the urban status quo will persist.

 

Joey D

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Deep layoffs and buyouts are taking place at Boeing.

Microsoft has been laying off for years and they continue.

Thank god Amazon is HQ'ed in Seattle then, along with Starbucks, PACCAR, Costco, Nordstroms, Zulily, along with several others. Seattle is at no risk of falling on hard times economically. Yes, it has problems, but so do most cities.

Many cities in the Western US are doing pretty well since Millenials from the Midwest don't want to live in the Midwest. The natural choice is to move west where there's more recreation, better jobs, and a more liberal attitude towards social issues.
 

Dotini

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Young Join the Rich Fleeing America’s Big Cities for Suburbs
By
Sophie Alexander
and
Nic Querolo
May 20, 2020, 6:58 AM PDT

  • Millennials returning home as lockdowns strip cities of allure

  • It just makes sense to ‘go back to your parents,’ broker says

Desiree Duff lost her bartending job in late March when the New York restaurant where she worked closed along with the rest of the city.
Duff, 29, an aspiring actress, left her apartment in Brooklyn’s Bushwick neighborhood and moved back in with her parents in South Carolina. She’s using unemployment checks to pay her $1,200 monthly share for the now-empty apartment and said she may still return. But the ordeal has left her rethinking the city’s appeal.


800x-1.jpg

Desiree Duff

“Not knowing what my future there looks like does make me reconsider,” Duff said. “Maybe after my lease is done I should move elsewhere, to a smaller city that was less infected, as much as that breaks my heart.”

As cities from New York to San Francisco have locked down in recent months to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, many residents have decided they’d rather wait out the pandemic elsewhere. While the wealthy have settled into their second homes in the Hamptons or Lake Tahoe, many young people are leaving expensive shoe-box apartments to shelter with their parents in the suburbs.

‘Abandon Ship’
“The draw of the city is the social life, the dating scene, bars, restaurants, the ability to do fun things on the weekend,” said Deniz Kahramaner, the founder of data-driven real estate brokerage Atlasa. Without those attractions, “it makes a lot of sense to just abandon ship and go back to your parents.”

The exodus has left apartments empty, remaining roommates scrambling to make rent and landlords wondering whether demand for apartments will return when life gets back to normal.

“It’s a really hard time for the renter, but it’s a really hard time for the housing provider, too,” said Charley Goss, government and community affairs manager at the San Francisco Apartment Association, which works on behalf of property owners.

A survey Goss conducted of 352 San Francisco landlords found that 17% -- an unusually large amount -- have had tenants break leases or give 30-day notice to vacate over the past month. Of those surveyed, a fifth said they’d received requests for temporary or permanent rent reductions.

Read more: Tech Workers Consider Escaping Silicon Valley’s Sky-High Rents

Alexa Lewis’s landlord is one of them. Lewis, 24, was living with four roommates in her apartment in the Richmond neighborhood of San Francisco when the city went on lockdown in mid-March. By the end of April, she was all alone.

One roommate took a pay cut and moved home with her family. Another decided to stay with an ex-boyfriend in Oregon, while the master tenant put in her 30-day notice. That left only Lewis and the other remaining roommate, who has been living with family in Sacramento since late March, to renew the lease and come up with $4,900 for May’s rent.

“There were a lot of calls with my family to talk out everything and ask for advice/cry,” Lewis said. Goss helped Lewis work with her landlord to get reduced rent in May and June while she finds other roommates.

Demand for apartments in San Francisco and New York -- the country’s two most expensive rental markets -- has dropped since the start of the pandemic. Search volumes for San Francisco rental units declined 36% soon after shelter-in-place orders took effect, according to a report by listing site Zumper. In New York, they fell 29%.

Soft Market
Even when the lockdowns lift and the economy begins to recover, Goss said he expects the rental market in San Francisco to stay slow -- possibly permanently so -- as more people embrace working from home.

“People won’t need to be in a job center if they can work from home,” he said. “I would expect to see less demand and that corresponds to lower rents.”

Rents may decline in New York as well, according to a report released Tuesday by listings website StreetEasy.

“Residents moving out of the city, even temporarily, could drive rents across the city down,” StreetEasy said, pointing to the 10% decline that followed the 2008 financial crisis.

Young people have been a major force in the back-to-the-city movement in recent decades, helping revive moribund neighborhoods and nourish new businesses. It has also resulted in tight rental markets and higher prices, even for the cramped apartments that define the living arrangements of so many recent graduates.

Aside from making it less appealing to quarantine in a small space, the shutdowns have also had an enormous economic impact on young adults. Almost 15% of those ages 25 to 34 were unemployed in April, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, with more than a quarter in their early 20s out of work.

Breaking Leases
Even as young renters flee the city, freeing some inventory, the effect on New York’s market for starter apartments will be minimal, said Jonathan Miller, president of appraiser Miller Samuel Inc. That’s mainly because of the difficulty of breaking leases and the prevalence of co-living, he said.

In the short term, Miller expects to see rental activity increase in New York’s suburbs, where inquiries were already edging up before the pandemic.

Atlasa’s Kahramaner said he has also seen an uptick in demand for San Francisco’s suburbs, where bigger houses with yards are increasingly appealing as more people work from home and the city’s homelessness crisis worsens.

“People are leaving San Francisco to try to buy a house in Marin or East Bay,” he said. “People have a renewed interest in the suburban life.”

A lot of clients looking to buy are millennials, who historically have been less inclined -- or less financially able -- than their parents to become homeowners, Kahramaner said.

The Youngsters
“It was just so unapproachable,” he said. “They’ve been saving up cash and waiting for a recessionary environment where they might be able to get some sort of a discount.”

For the generation that came after millennials, such options are still a long way off. Daniel Chandross, 23, who works for Google, moved out of his Seattle apartment and is living with his family in the Midwest for the foreseeable future. He and his roommate, who works at Facebook, are still paying rent on the empty apartment, but their lease is up soon and they have to decide whether to renew.

With some tech firms telling workers they may not return to the office until next year, and expectations that remote work may continue even after the shutdown is over, that’s becoming a harder decision.

“We’re throwing around the option of moving our stuff into a storage facility,” Chandross said in a text. “No reason to waste money on rent if we can live/work at home ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.”

— With assistance by Sarah Frier
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...rich-fleeing-america-s-big-cities-for-suburbs
 

Joey D

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So this is just a dump thread for all Dotini links?

I know right?

@Dotini are you actually going to attempt to have a conversation or are you just going to regurgitate links without providing any context or thought? Also, I hope all your sources surrounding all these sociological studies are peer-reviewed because we know how you feel about non-peer-reviewed sources.
 

Dotini

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@Joey D
Once you and the others have read the OP, studied the evidence here provided, and acknowledged there is a problem and a real basis for this thread, then I will indulge selective intelligent questions.


Seattle workers lose jobs and worry about rent as coronavirus slows business

The virus’ impact is affecting healthy people as workers are laid off and see hours reduced.

by
/ March 11, 2020

Jenny Ives was scheduled to work a double shift on Monday. What she got instead was a notice that she and all her colleagues at Blueacre Seafood in downtown Seattle were effectively laid off.

UPDATE:
To stop COVID-19, Washington implements measures not seen since Spanish flu

“As of tomorrow, March 8th, Blueacre Seafood will be temporarily closed due to the social and economic effects of COVID-19 coronavirus,” read the email to employees just before midnight Saturday.

It wasn’t just her restaurant. Steelhead Diner, Orfeo, Zane + Wylie's and Tempesta Coffee & Donuts — all under the same ownership group, Kevin Davis Restaurants — have been shuttered as well, putting nearly 200 employees out of work.

The closure is temporary, in theory. But the reopening is set for “when the downtown employees, tourists and conventioneers have returned,” a date that owners Kevin and Terresa Davis acknowledged in their email they could not guess.

If it does come, it’s not likely to be soon. The Davises recommended to employees that they seek unemployment benefits through the state.

“Right now it’s kind of scary because I don’t know 100% I’m going to be able to make rent,” said Ives, a server at Blueacre since September. She renewed her lease for another year two weeks ago, which means she’s locked in to her North Seattle home. The price of living in the city has her nervous. “It’s hard. It’s a very expensive city,” she said.

As coronavirus takes hold in King County, public health officials are urging residents to practice “social distancing” by avoiding large groups, telecommuting when possible and canceling nonessential large events. What has followed is a large-scale quieting of this booming city, with its growing population of tourists and tech workers and busy restaurant scene.

The widespread effort to control the spread of the virus, which seems to move easily from person to person, is already reverberating into people’s pocketbooks and is likely to continue to do so.

On Tuesday, Local 360 Cafe and Bar in Belltown said it was closing its doors, blaming the coronavirus. Seattle City Councilmember Andrew Lewis said Monday that he’s heard from businesses in his downtown district that traffic has plummeted, and closures — both temporary and permanent — are likely to follow.


Inside the Steelhead Diner, which was closed as business fell off during the coronavirus. (Shaminder Dulai/Crosscut)

Inside the Steelhead Diner, which was closed as business fell off during the coronavirus. (Shaminder Dulai/Crosscut)

Egan Orion, director of the Broadway Business Improvement Area and a former Seattle City Council candidate, told Crosscut that the warnings he’s hearing from businesses — restaurants in particular — are “apocalyptic.”

"If this lasts longer than a month or two, you’re going to see a lot of businesses closing," he said.

For workers, the impact could be particularly painful. In a city as expensive as Seattle — at a time when an unexpected expense would push many people into debt — the prospect of losing even one paycheck can be frightening for lower-wage workers, who often lack cash assets, or liquidity.

“If the Seattle population is anything like the population at large, it’s a liquidity crunch which many people are ill-equipped to handle,” said Philip Bond, professor of finance and business economics at the University of Washington’s Foster School of business.

Officials at all levels of government are scrambling to find ways to mitigate the stress on both workers and businesses, searching for the extent of their authority.

“We’re building this plane as we fly,” Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda said in a remote meeting of the council Monday.

Mayor Jenny Durkan on Tuesday announced a number of measures to help businesses, including deferring tax collection, providing utility assistance, expanding the relief fund for some "microbusinesses," helping businesses access federal loans and exploring other ways to make direct investments. Deputy Mayor Mike Fong said the city is also exploring rent relief.

Durkan also announced there would be no utility shutoffs as the outbreak unfolds. This came a day after a group of labor organizations called on elected officials to halt evictions and utility shutoffs, preserve medical benefits and offer emergency assistance to workers.

“The next few months will be tough," Durkan said in a statement.

The state has also said it could offer tax relief and waive penalties for missed payments. On Tuesday, Gov. Jay Inslee said the state would expand unemployment access to people who may lose work resulting from COVID-19 in order to “widen the safety net.” The new benefits would help workers who might lose hours due to a temporary shutdown of business or because they’re quarantined.

Amazon, meanwhile, has said it would offer $5 million in assistance to businesses near its campus that are struggling as thousands of the company's employees work from home.

Employees in the service industry, however, may face an immediate crisis.

At Blueacre, server Alex Atkins said he and his colleagues had already seen their paychecks lighten in recent weeks and months. Winters are always slower. But spring is when the dampened business is supposed to rebound. The workers “were all really relying on the business to return,” said Atkins.

Instead, workers near Blueacre, at Seventh Avenue and Olive Way, have stayed home and nearby conventions have been scratched, making business at the restaurant slower than ever. The closure lands especially hard on workers whose bank accounts are already stretched from the slow winter season.

In a letter to city officials, Molly Moon Neitzel of Molly Moon's Ice Cream echoed this concern. “Many of us hold our breath in the last few months of winter in terms of cash flow,” she said. And now that exhale has been delayed.

Atkins said he’s going to try to make up some of what he’ll lose by driving for DoorDash, delivering food. But he said temporary work won’t come close to covering the difference. Atkins has worked for Blueacre for nearly a year and at the restaurant’s peak, he said he could make $2,000 a paycheck.

Atkins lives in Tacoma and, at $500 a month, his rent is relatively low. Still, he fears even that would be a stretch with DoorDash alone, so he plans to seek unemployment. “I suspect that this may be a permanent closure,” he speculated.

Kevin Davis did not return an email seeking comment.

For workers suffering from a drop in demand, the UW's Bond said the solution is both simple and complicated: “It’s basically getting checks to people who are affected,” he said. “Pausing to think about how to implement that, it becomes relatively challenging.”

And while lower-wage workers will be the first to feel the impact, the effects are likely to ripple outward, Bond said. “If I’m a dentist, I might have fewer people coming in,” he said.

The quickest existing path for workers is through unemployment compensation.

Ives, the Blueacre employee, is asking around for shifts at other restaurants and bars. But what had been a voracious restaurant industry just a month ago has ground to a halt. Restaurants may remain open, but they’re certainly not hiring.

“I guess this is a thing now,” she said. “I guess we all have to figure out what we’re going to do, how we’re going to pay rent, how we’re going to live.”
https://crosscut.com/2020/03/seattl...d-worry-about-rent-coronavirus-slows-business
 
8,735
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I know right?

@Dotini are you actually going to attempt to have a conversation or are you just going to regurgitate links without providing any context or thought? Also, I hope all your sources surrounding all these sociological studies are peer-reviewed because we know how you feel about non-peer-reviewed sources.

ASKED AND ANSWERED :lol:

This is an exciting time for @Dotini. With any luck, he'll get to watch all the young liberals endure economic hardship and bask in their shattered dreams.
 
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Dotini

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The context and thought behind this post is in the OP. The evidence is provided comprehensively and will continue. Pages and pages and pages of it. Once someone, anyone, can reply that the thread is responsive to a real problem and the evidence compelling, and want to ask me a polite question, I may choose to reply. Or not.

Businesses reconsidering future in downtown Seattle over crime

POSTED 5:53 PM, JANUARY 29, 2020, BY HANA KIM, UPDATED AT 06:07AM, JANUARY 30, 2020


Businesses reconsidering future in downtown Seattle over crime

SEATTLE -- Andrea Raetzer wonders if last week’s mass shooting at 3rd and Pine is the reason why Steepologie Teas is awfully quiet.

“It hurts, it does hurt, sales have declined,” Raetzer said.

As sales dip at the corner of 4th and Stewart there is an even a bigger dilemma.

“I have two team members who no longer will work this store. That hurts business when I can’t employ people that feel safe to work,” Raetzer said.

From employees to customers, the same theme has been building for years.

“People don’t feel safe coming here,” Raetzer said.

She can’t blame them: just last week a woman attacked her daughter, who is an employee.

Raetzer says a woman speaking incoherently was harassing customers. When her daughter asked her to leave, the woman started throwing punches.

“She is walking towards the door away from customers, she’s actually taking abuse as she’s walking to the door because in her mind she is trying to keep customers safe, putting herself in harms way,” Raetzer said.

There is still some hope at this tea shop that things will get better, but next door at Barone Crystal there is no more waiting.

“We are leaving because the crime is out of control,” Gina Barone Simmons said.

The engraving store has been on the same block for 30 years, started by Gina’s dad, Gino Barone.

“This is my legacy; this is not something I take lightly,” Simmons said.

But she says her family can only take so much.

“I’ve had people threaten, spit and throw things,” Simmons said.

She started bringing her dog to work for protection and locking the doors even during business hours.

“Tipping point was we had a guy throw a wrench through our window,” Simmons said.

Hopefully it’s the last attack for Barone Crystal until they close their downtown store for good on April 1.

Simmons says they are hoping to relocate to the Southcenter area.

Barone Crystal's departure comes after Bartell Drugs closed their branch on 3rd Avenue and Union in November.

Bartell Drugs cited crime and city policies as the reasons for closing the store.

Meanwhile, Raetzer says she wants city leaders to try new policies but she also prosecutors to draw a line in the sand on crimes that are not acceptable.

“Once you cross over into posing a danger to society ... they need to be behind bars,” Raetzer said.

After seeing the video of the assault for the first time on Tuesday, Q13 News reached out to the city attorney’s office about the case. They had yet to charge the woman.

“I am shocked,” Raetzer said.

On Wednesday the city attorney’s office confirmed to Q13 News that there was a paperwork issue and once the proper details were processed that prosecutors would weigh charges.

Raetzer updated Q13 News to say that the city attorney’s office also contacted her daughter on Wednesday to talk about the attack.

While their case is pending, Raetzer also wants city leaders to know that crime stats are not capturing the constant psychotic outbreaks, harassment and the open drug market in the downtown core.

“I’ve had heroin addicts trying to use my table outside the door. I’ve had infants with mothers who is high on the corner,” Raetzer said.

She also stopped letting random people use the bathroom because of drug paraphernalia left behind.

Raetzer says there is only so much Seattle Police can do, and she emphasized that all the officers she has come in contact with have been attentive and thorough.

“Sometimes I wonder if anybody really understands what they deal with on a day to day basis,” Raetzer said.

But she also admits she has stopped reporting crime like she used to.
https://q13fox.com/2020/01/29/busin...ntown-seattle-or-leaving-for-good-over-crime/