Ferrari Daytona SP3

14,301
Antarctica
TRAPPIST-1g
ProjectWHaT
A new Ferrari to join the Icona lineup

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The Daytona has a wholly unique design that is the Ferrari’s most aerodynamically efficient model ever built. And that’s without any active aero bits and a more powerful – hotter – engine. Aerodynamics and cooling were vital components of the car’s design, resulting in large openings and intakes. Even the thick butterfly door features a large airbox that channels air to the side-mounted radiators.

The most striking design aspect is the rear, where Ferrari has a stack of vertical bars spanning across it. The taillights are made up of horizontal bars just below the spoiler, though they integrate well with the rest of the blades. Centrally mounted dual exhaust tips poke out high on the aggressive rear diffuser.

The exterior design greatly influenced the interior layout, with the wraparound windscreen enclosing the cabin. The seats are integrated into the chassis with an adjustable pedal box, while Ferrari’s Human-Machine Interface allows drivers to keep their hands on the steering wheel to control 80 percent of the vehicle’s functions.

Powering the Daytona – and needing all that thermal management – is a revamped 6.5-liter V12 borrowed from the 812 Competizione. Ferrari worked to reduce the engine’s weight and inertia, adopting titanium connecting rods, new piston pins with a Diamond Like Carbon treatment, and a rebalanced crankshaft that’s three percent lighter.

The engine, the F140HC, now makes 828 horsepower (617 kilowatts) and 514 pound-feet (697 Newton-meters) of torque, making it the most powerful engine Ferrari has ever built. The engine screams to a 9,500-rpm redline, and it pairs to a seven-speed gearbox. The Daytona can hit 62 miles per hour (100 kilometers per hour) in 2.86 seconds. It only needs 7.4 seconds to hits 124 mph (200 kph).

Ferrari says it “radically redesigned” the engine’s intake, now with a more compact manifold and plenum. The power is nice, though the engine produces 30 percent fewer pollution emissions and particulate formations than the 812 Comp. Neat.

Ferrari used composite materials for the chassis and body, including carbon fiber and Kevlar. Ferrari also tasked Pirelli with creating a specific tire for the SP3, optimizing the tire for both wet and dry performance. The Daytona is also the first V12 Ferrari to get the company’s Dynamic Enhancer, which makes driving the car at the limit more manageable and more controllable.

Ferrari doesn’t detail a price or how limited the production run will be, though we expect most, if not all, already have owners. Ferrari did not say when deliveries would begin.


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8,930
United States
Marin County
While I can't say it doesn't look good or the numbers aren't impressive, I also struggle to care about this. Ferrari has lost a little bit of the mystique somehow. Like Mclaren, they keep pumping out new models but it just seems so routine now. I remember the anticipation and the hype around the release of the Enzo...it felt like a real event, like Ferrari had put everything they had and years of development into it, it had a back story - the effort sunk into the Enzo made it legendary since day one. This one (and some others) just feels like they shook it out of their sleeve. It's possible the effort was similar to the Enzo effort, but it certainly doesn't feel like it. I think Ferrari has started to forget that people are buying a story (the story, you could argue) when they buy that prancing horse badge, not just a very nice product. The commodification of the brand, I think, was a pretty predictable result of the IPO.

The fact that a brand new V12 mid engine Ferrari was revealed a week ago and it only drew a single response on this forum I think is pretty telling. If anything, the Roma was a far more compelling proposition because it felt somewhat important. This does not somehow.
 
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39,275
Australia
The Bronx
Think they lost me after the Scaglietti and 599(all versions). I’m more in the FR camp, when it comes to the brand. I still dig the F40, 308-328 and 430. The 488 does look wild in the metal, but I like the long nose short deck stuff. The MR cars are more Hot Wheels fantasy than “proper” GT Ferrari to my eyes. This one is a Meh.

Oh… thought this was the Cool Wall. :sly:
 
2,854
United States
Connecticut
Ridley-X4
I think it's neat, if only as a design exercise. I'm much more interested in stuff like the SF90 Stradale and the prototype they plan to enter into LMH in a couple years, at least as far as Ferraris go. Gotta say though, they've been great to me as an investor, and I think they'll only get better once the Purosangue gets revealed next year.
 
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McLaren

Premium
41,783
United States
Texas
While I can't say it doesn't look good or the numbers aren't impressive, I also struggle to care about this. Ferrari has lost a little bit of the mystique somehow. Like Mclaren, they keep pumping out new models but it just seems so routine now. I remember the anticipation and the hype around the release of the Enzo...it felt like a real event, like Ferrari had put everything they had and years of development into it, it had a back story - the effort sunk into the Enzo made it legendary since day one. This one (and some others) just feels like they shook it out of their sleeve. It's possible the effort was similar to the Enzo effort, but it certainly doesn't feel like it. I think Ferrari has started to forget that people are buying a story (the story, you could argue) when they buy that prancing horse badge, not just a very nice product. The commodification of the brand, I think, was a pretty predictable result of the IPO.

The fact that a brand new V12 mid engine Ferrari was revealed a week ago and it only drew a single response on this forum I think is pretty telling. If anything, the Roma was a far more compelling proposition because it felt somewhat important. This does not somehow.
They kind of did, I suppose. I don't remember hearing anything about this & it just plopped out out of nowhere. I thought it was another 1-off til' I saw the white one, and thought maybe the guy had 2 built. Nope, they apparently want to build 700 of these.

This car, or rather its lineup (Icona) could very well be a supporting argument to your point; maybe Ferrari is just relying on their greatest hits, re-imagined, to move even more products to satisfy the bean counters. It seems to have ruffled feathers with the Tifosi; a very well respected Ferrari historian pointed that this SP3 clearly shares lineage to the 250 P5, yet Ferrari insists on sharing the car is inspired by the P3 & P4.
 
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Keef

Premium
22,600
United States
Dayton, OH
GTP_KeefRacer
GTP Keef
Ferrari is doing such weird things with their design, honestly I don't know what to make of it. Some of the details on this car are so cool, especially the strakes and the concave grille, but when you look at the car as a whole it's just hideous. There is no traditionally beautiful flow to it at all, unlike the classic example @lancia delta hf posted. That car is extremely classy and pretty. But the SP3 looks like it's cobbled together from random parts of other cars. Everything in between the front and rear fascias is an incongruent disaster.

That's pretty strange to me given that the SP1 and SP2 are a couple of the prettiest cars Ferrari has designed in decades. If they'd have applied these strake details to one of those two it could've transformed a pretty car into a cool retro-futuristic thing but instead they decided to slap some cool lines on a disaster of a body.