Lamborghini 634 - Huracan Replacement

AudiMan2011

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With production of the Huracan winding down, its successor has stepped out for the first time. Set to adopt a similar styling language to the V12 Revuelto as well as adopting a hybrid powertrain. With the Audi R8 unlikely to be replaced, the new car will likely feature a more bespoke platform. A full reveal is due some time next year.
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Video of the new car. You can hear it's initially in EV mode before it turns on the engine sort of like LMP cars




We get to hear the engine around the 1:00 mark before the electrified machine reverses in EV mode.

The most exciting part of the video is at 1:14 when the driver fires up the internal combustion engine again. As expected, it sadly does not like the naturally aspirated V10 used in the Huracan and Audi R8. Instead, it's likely a downsized engine, possibly a twin-turbo V8, according to recent reports. Rumor has it the turbochargers are not going to kick until 7,000 rpm, so for the most part of the driving experience, it'll behave like a naturally aspirated engine. The redline is supposedly at 10,000 rpm.
 
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Lambo has revealed details of the new powertrain for the Huracan successor, now officially codenamed 634.

The combustion engine is now a 4.0 twin turbo flat plane V8 that will redline at 10,000rpm. On its own, the V8 will make close to 800hp. The hybrid system like the one from the Revuelto is expected to add another 150hp.

 
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This is a huge step backwards. Not another 4.0L TT flat plane V8...pleeeeease. I don't care if it revs to 20,000rpm, it won't have the same personality as that n/a V10. Just make the V10 a PHEV, what are they doing? The V10 is now dead industry wide, is it not?
 
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Lamborghini should not even remotely care about efficiency or emissions unless its barring them from selling cars. And turbos should not be a thing in a Lambo. I want to hear raw machinery out the back of my Lambo.
 
Problem is that some countries/states have emission laws so they have to reduce their overall emissions. This in turn makes everyone else suffer because companies aren't going to design separate engines for separate markets. I'm guessing having Volkswagen looking over their shoulder doesn't help either.
 
Problem is that some countries/states have emission laws so they have to reduce their overall emissions. This in turn makes everyone else suffer because companies aren't going to design separate engines for separate markets. I'm guessing having Volkswagen looking over their shoulder doesn't help either.
Not sure which countries specifically are not making exceptions for low-volume cars - I assume they're European, although California causes the same issues inside the US - but these governments really need to get it together. They keep trying to target exotics and race cars, extremely low volume vehicles in miniscule contributions to anything at all really. There might be a couple Lamborghinis in the entire city I live in but there are thousands of stupid diesel pickup trucks and semi trucks roaming around causing a ruckus and blowing smoke.
 
Problem is that some countries/states have emission laws so they have to reduce their overall emissions. This in turn makes everyone else suffer because companies aren't going to design separate engines for separate markets. I'm guessing having Volkswagen looking over their shoulder doesn't help either.
From what i can see figures for, most international markets have emission targets for manufacturers to aim for and the US is one of them. There are loopholes in some markets for lower volume manufacturers, but Lamborghini now sell over 10,000 cars a year, so they aren't one of them.
 
but Lamborghini now sell over 10,000 cars a year,
There's a way to fix that and it's called ridiculously high prices and ridiculously low production numbers. It's almost like these companies want to become mainstream. What do the profits get them, a total loss of brand identity over time? Lambo should making like two cars, one of which should be absolutely bat**** insane and dangerous to drive, the other should be a motorsports-focused sports car that starts at like half a million dollars. That's it. Both of them have monumental naturally aspirated noise makers in the back.
 
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There's a way to fix that and it's called ridiculously high prices and ridiculously low production numbers. It's almost like these companies want to become mainstream. What do the profits get them, a total loss of brand identity over time? Lambo should making like two cars, one of which should be absolutely bat**** insane and dangerous to drive, the other should be a motorsports-focused sports car that starts at like half a million dollars. That's it. Both of them have monumental naturally aspirated noise makers in the back.
For the business strategy you are proposing, you have to look at pure private companies like Pagani, GMA, etc which basically do exactly what you are saying...because building cars is their primary purpose for existing, not making executives obscenely rich (which isn't to say that Horacio Pagani and Gordan Murray aren't wealthy [~$50m], they just aren't Piech family wealthy [$50bn+] wealthy). Lamborghini answers to VAG, and VAG answers to shareholders, and shareholders love a quarterly report where stuff goes up, particularly market share and/or volume.
 
Not sure which countries specifically are not making exceptions for low-volume cars - I assume they're European, although California causes the same issues inside the US - but these governments really need to get it together. They keep trying to target exotics and race cars, extremely low volume vehicles in miniscule contributions to anything at all really. There might be a couple Lamborghinis in the entire city I live in but there are thousands of stupid diesel pickup trucks and semi trucks roaming around causing a ruckus and blowing smoke.
In the U.S., it's primarily California but in Europe it's the EU countries. European countries not in the EU have pretty strict emission laws too. If the US wants to cut down on emissions, firstly they need to go after coal-which they have been doing-because it's one of the biggest polluters. High-performance automobiles shouldn't be regulated as seriously because they make up a very small percentage of the total carbon-pollution in the U.S. What we really need to go after are those unnecessarily large luxury Gulfstream Private Jets that politicians fly around in. Obviously, that isn't going to happen because the people for and against fossil fuels both fly around in those jet fuel guzzling tin cans.
 
For the business strategy you are proposing, you have to look at pure private companies like Pagani, GMA, etc which basically do exactly what you are saying...because building cars is their primary purpose for existing, not making executives obscenely rich (which isn't to say that Horacio Pagani and Gordan Murray aren't wealthy [~$50m], they just aren't Piech family wealthy [$50bn+] wealthy). Lamborghini answers to VAG, and VAG answers to shareholders, and shareholders love a quarterly report where stuff goes up, particularly market share and/or volume.
Another alternative is just to go Ferrari's route: Making a small displacement sports cars that are meant to appeal to young-buyers and middle-aged buyers who got bored of their 911. Also making a huge naturally aspirated 6.5L V12 coupe that costs the same as the average house in suburban Nashville.

Problem with going with higher production numbers is that it moves the brand toward a different audience. Lamborghini's main audience is loud and showy movie stars who don't want to be seen driving around in the same car as the guy who cuts their lawn. Over time, when you reduce a brands prestige, you end up competing with other brands who have been in the market much longer than you. (Look what happened to Maserati after the oil crisis)
 
There's a way to fix that and it's called ridiculously high prices and ridiculously low production numbers. It's almost like these companies want to become mainstream. What do the profits get them, a total loss of brand identity over time? Lambo should making like two cars, one of which should be absolutely bat**** insane and dangerous to drive, the other should be a motorsports-focused sports car that starts at like half a million dollars. That's it. Both of them have monumental naturally aspirated noise makers in the back.
What loss of brand identity?

I love Lamborghini, but the brand's core identity has been an expensive, extremely flashy, loud supercar for the last 35+ years. And it barely survived being that until VAG picked them up considering they went through 3 different owners in the 90's.
 
What loss of brand identity?

I love Lamborghini, but the brand's core identity has been an expensive, extremely flashy, loud supercar for the last 35+ years. And it barely survived being that until VAG picked them up considering they went through 3 different owners in the 90's.
That type of car didn’t sell back then. Today, they’re selling faster than ever.
 
That type of car didn’t sell back then. Today, they’re selling faster than ever.
Doesn't really negate my point that the brand's core identity is still the same as it's ever been for the last 35+ years.

However, since you know that type of car didn't sell back then, you do realize that the issue you're taking up with (Lamborghini building a ton of cars each year) was a goal they had set out for multiple times. The Jalpa was brought out to be a more affordable Lamborghini as they fought through bankruptcy in the 80's & became the only time in history Lamborghini made a profit. When Chrysler took over, they wanted to replicate it with the P140, hoping to sell 1,000 units a year. However, the Diablo was revealed & they directed everything on it instead, taking in record orders. The short-lived profits there went down & Chrysler sold it to MegaTech who again wanted to revive a V10 entry model with the Cala. VAG took over, shelved that idea until the Gallardo came along that ultimately brought the company into financial safety.

Point being, the super expensive 2-model idea you're proposing to keep the "core identity alive" has never been sustainable for the brand and Mimran, Chrysler, MegaTech & VAG all recognized a much cheaper model was needed to keep the company afloat. So, it needs models like the Huracan & Urus to keep money pouring in for the "bat**** insane" examples to be built. The "Motorsports-focused" car is the Huracan given the success that car has brought them in racing organizations.

And even if the company could now live off just 1 or 2 ultra-expensive cars just to keep their brand identity alive, they will never go back to it b/c building less cars a year means less money. Which again, is ultimately pointless because the brand identity is still alive & well. Owners are buying the Huracan, Urus, & Revuelto because they are all flashy, loud supercars just as the Countach, Diablo, Murcielago, Aventador & Gallardo were. The cars really did nothing else spectacular until Lamborghini built a few track-focused models that started actually setting a couple lap records.
 
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