New Thrustmaster F1 Wheel?

  • Thread starter PzR Slim
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hampus_dh

(Banned)
1,897
if you want some very nice wheels it's Rozo wheels.

or for gt its Cubewheels,

btw, even if the f1 rim do not have steady shifters its still possible to do fairly simple on the t500.
 
New technical specs availables here:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B005L0Z2BG/ref=s9_simh_gw_p63_d0_g63_i1?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0N3TJREV9SEZF2RYX4H6&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=467128533&pf_rd_i=468294

Add-On for use with Thrustmaster RS Series
Collector’s item!

THE detachable Ferrari 150th Italia racing wheel replica for the Thrustmaster T500 RS**, the benchmark simulator controller for PlayStation3.

A precise, robust and realistic racing wheel


# Full-size replica of the Formula 1 Ferrari 2011 racing wheel, under official license by Ferrari, for your T500 RS.
# Genuine F1-style scratched-brushed metal "Push & Pull" shifters
# Reinforced scratched-brushed metal facing ensuring optimum solidity and inertia
# Rubber-textured wheel offering a realistic and comfortable grip
# Professional quality rotary knobs, switches and action buttons:
- 2 x encoder rotary knobs (to adjust car settings directly during the race)
- 8 x dual detent push-buttons
- 3 x 3-position metal switches with wheel re-centering
- 2 x high pressure, 8-directional D-pads responding to realistic pressure
- 2 x up/down speed shifters (F1 "Push & Pull"¨ style)
# Two available game modes:
- "Normal" mode, PC and PS3. compatible (offering 13 action buttons and 3 D-pads)
- "Advanced" mode, PC compatible (offering 25 action buttons and 1 D-pad)
# Detachable racing wheel featuring the "Thrustmaster Quick Release" system ¡V quickly switch from the T500 RS GT wheel to the F1 Ferrari* wheel (and conversely).

* A T500 RS firmware update (available from http:ts.thrustmaster.com) is required to operate the F1 Ferrari racing wheel
** T500 RS driving simulator sold separately


This Thrustmaster product features a 2-year warranty.
 

hampus_dh

(Banned)
1,897
Why do they refer to it as push & pull? Surely they can only be shifted towards you meaning pull only?
Or can we shift by pushing the paddles away? I doubt an F1 car has ever had a gearbox like that, that´s more WRC Rally stuff.
 
News on facebook page:

The Ferrari F1 Wheel Add-On features numerous professional quality rotary knobs, switches and action buttons:
- 2 Dials /Rotary Encoders (to adjust your car settings directly during the race)
- 8 Dual detent Push-buttons
- Three 3-position Metal Switches (with wheel re-centering)
- 2 high pressure, 8-directional D-pads
- 2 Up/Down speed shifters (F1 push-pull style)


301524_277695178924891_177715455589531_1104348_271500424_n.jpg
 
1,304
GTP_Majik / Majik893
Why do they refer to it as push & pull? Surely they can only be shifted towards you meaning pull only?
Or can we shift by pushing the paddles away? I doubt an F1 car has ever had a gearbox like that, that´s more WRC Rally stuff.

David Coulthard mentioned he used this type of system so he could shift down with his right hand if he really had to (extraordinary circumstances). They were dicussing it last year when some of the drivers were using their hand for the f-duct and driving one-handed.
 
3,195
tribolik
David Coulthard mentioned he used this type of system so he could shift down with his right hand if he really had to (extraordinary circumstances). They were dicussing it last year when some of the drivers were using their hand for the f-duct and driving one-handed.

Maybe because they had other controls outside the steering wheel... like last year with the blown difusers... at least in some old onboard videos you can see them taking the hands out of the wheel to push something inside the car...
 

hampus_dh

(Banned)
1,897
David Coulthard mentioned he used this type of system so he could shift down with his right hand if he really had to (extraordinary circumstances). They were dicussing it last year when some of the drivers were using their hand for the f-duct and driving one-handed.

Ok but you really don´t want to use the F-duct while downshifting.
It´s made to stall the wing and during braking/downshifting you want as much downforce as possible.

Must be some other cause as to why they use it.

They also use a level for brake bias (certain teams)
 
In addition, when a Formula 1 car pulls out of the pits, the driver has to turn the steering wheel to an extreme lock to avoid his pit crew, at the same time as changing up quickly through the gears as he accelerates away. Pulling a paddle with your arms at full lock is not an easy or natural action. So "Pull / Push system" is used to allow the driver to push as well as pull, to select a gear. It gives the driver total control, allowing them to change gear quickly, easily and accurately even when tackling a hairpin at high speed.

In reality rather than being mounted to the steering column, it’s part of the steering wheel. "Pull / Push system" avoids the problem of traditional paddles being out of reach if you’re at full lock, and keeps the driver connected to the gears at all times, whichever way they’re turning.
 
1,304
GTP_Majik / Majik893
Ok but you really don´t want to use the F-duct while downshifting.
It´s made to stall the wing and during braking/downshifting you want as much downforce as possible.

Must be some other cause as to why they use it.

They also use a level for brake bias (certain teams)

Absolutely, there was no F-duct when DC was driving, must have been for other adjustments (brake bias etc) and I think WildRun nailed it in the post above mine.
 

hampus_dh

(Banned)
1,897
In addition, when a Formula 1 car pulls out of the pits, the driver has to turn the steering wheel to an extreme lock to avoid his pit crew, at the same time as changing up quickly through the gears as he accelerates away. Pulling a paddle with your arms at full lock is not an easy or natural action. So "Pull / Push system" is used to allow the driver to push as well as pull, to select a gear. It gives the driver total control, allowing them to change gear quickly, easily and accurately even when tackling a hairpin at high speed.

In reality rather than being mounted to the steering column, it’s part of the steering wheel. "Pull / Push system" avoids the problem of traditional paddles being out of reach if you’re at full lock, and keeps the driver connected to the gears at all times, whichever way they’re turning.

The paddle is in the same place at all times (on the wheel) so pulling something towards you will always be more beneficial then pushing something away from you.

Pitlane is done in 1st gear aswell..

Sorry don´t buy the arguments, there must be some other cause for this.
 
The paddle is in the same place at all times (on the wheel) so pulling something towards you will always be more beneficial then pushing something away from you.

Inertia says otherwise?

Sorry don´t buy the arguments, there must be some other cause for this.

I know in some cases it was driver preference.

To get back to the wheel itself, even with the push pull system, I don't recall seeing two functions detailed for the shifters so there's then another question about wether forward or back would do the same thing or the opposite.
 
1,304
GTP_Majik / Majik893
The paddle is in the same place at all times (on the wheel) so pulling something towards you will always be more beneficial then pushing something away from you.

Unless you only have one hand on the wheel.

According to this page on yahoo answers, it seems that DC mentioned the rocker paddles again this year, must have missed it, but here's the quote on the page:

David Coulthard explained during this year's Montreal grand prix commentary that the paddles are on a "rocker" attached to the steering wheel, meaning either paddle can be used for both upshift and downshift. This is important because they often have one hand on the wheel when making adjustments to their set up.

I remember some versions of Sega's F355 Challenge Arcade units had the rocker paddles too, and was exactly what I thought of when DC mentioned it (he has done so a few times).

Edit: The MP4-12C also has a rocker paddle system, and is exactly the information WildRun posted:

http://www.mclarenautomotive.com/uk/Chapters/Pages/explore_rocker_paddle.aspx
 
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hampus_dh

(Banned)
1,897
Inertia says otherwise?

I know in some cases it was driver preference.

To get back to the wheel itself, even with the push pull system, I don't recall seeing two functions detailed for the shifters so there's then another question about wether forward or back would do the same thing or the opposite.

Inertia really only counts for the head of the driver as the body is strapped in very hard.
Yea i´m guessing they just call it push&pull paddles.

Unless you only have one hand on the wheel.

According to this page on yahoo answers, it seems that DC mentioned the rocker paddles again this year, must have missed it, but here's the quote on the page:

Still sounds very strange though as during braking you experience around 3-5G´s depending on the corner, so settings you do before the corner on the straight not during the actual braking.

"This is important because they often have one hand on the wheel when making adjustments to their set up."

It just doesn´t make any sense from a driving point of view for me atleast.
I can´t think of a single scenario where it would be beneficial to push a lever instead of pulling it.
 
Inertia really only counts for the head of the driver as the body is strapped in very hard.

Huh? Explain please

I was responding specifically to the comment that puling was always more beneficial. Under braking everything in the car, strapped in or not wants to move forwards, so some might prefer moving forwards to change down.

It was just a throw away comment really and before the flame war starts... I don't want to take the thread further off track.... I know you could say we're only talking about fingers and I could say it's still physics no matter how insignificant.

So we're definitely all correct :)
 
1,304
GTP_Majik / Majik893
It just doesn´t make any sense from a driving point of view for me atleast.
I can´t think of a single scenario where it would be beneficial to push a lever instead of pulling it.

My take is that it's a last resort, not something the drivers would actually use over pulling the downshift by choice. Imagine you're on a straight, adjusting a setting and an incident happens in front unexpectedly, at least you can keep your revs up without fumbling around. Or I think an extreme example could be at a start, where you still have the bite-point clutch paddle accuratley positioned and you suddely have to react and downshift without getting bogged-down too much. Try quickly downshifting with your index and middle finger, without moving the clutch paddle which is finely positioned with your ring and pinky. Not easy.

Also, you're mentioning inertia and braking Gs, but what about shifting up during a straight with the left hand, whist adjusting something with the right hand?

Either way, I guess it's better to have the feature and not need it, than to need it and not have it.
 

OwensRacing

I’m your Huckleberry
Premium
7,711
United States
Indiana-USA
OwensRacing
papaspurs
I was responding specifically to the comment that puling was always more beneficial. Under braking everything in the car, strapped in or not wants to move forwards, so some might prefer moving forwards to change down.

It was just a throw away comment really and before the flame war starts... I don't want to take the thread further off track.... I know you could say we're only talking about fingers and I could say it's still physics no matter how insignificant.

So we're definitely all correct :)

I appreciate you explaining and see where you are coming from.
 

hampus_dh

(Banned)
1,897
My take is that it's a last resort, not something the drivers would actually use over pulling the downshift by choice. Imagine you're on a straight, adjusting a setting and an incident happens in front unexpectedly, at least you can keep your revs up without fumbling around. Or I think an extreme example could be at a start, where you still have the bite-point clutch paddle accuratley positioned and you suddely have to react and downshift without getting bogged-down too much. Try quickly downshifting with your index and middle finger, without moving the clutch paddle which is finely positioned with your ring and pinky. Not easy.

Also, you're mentioning inertia and braking Gs, but what about shifting up during a straight with the left hand, whist adjusting something with the right hand?

Either way, I guess it's better to have the feature and not need it, than to need it and not have it.

Yea i think i get it now, it´s obviously during acceleration out of corners and such this is useful.

I just had to find the scenario where it actually was necessary or beneficial to flick the left paddle for example.
 
6,583
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Logitech have a .press event in Holland today.... Could be a new wheel :)

That would be welcome news. Maybe that is why G27 price is dropping, well in the UK it is a bit lower than before? More competition in the high end the better.
 
2,143
United Kingdom
UK
amf7F1
That would be welcome news. Maybe that is why G27 price is dropping, well in the UK it is a bit lower than before? More competition in the high end the better.

Hopefully :) I know its a gaming event so hopefully....
 
New preview:
http://www.marcaplayer.com/2011/09/13/opinion/1315898624.html#comentarios

Translation:
http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=es&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.marcaplayer.com%2F2011%2F09%2F13%2Fopinion%2F1315898624.html%23comentarios

This confirm again that with "F1 wheel" Force Feedback is even more powerful than with "GT Wheel". Probably because of new inertia, smaller size of F1 wheel but also new position of hands (more closed and fixed).
 
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