Thrustmaster T-LCM pedals

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Gr8_Lakes

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Gr8_Lakes
I don’t get why we can’t pre order from amazon.ca, also it bin a awail here in Canada we can’t get t-GT , can it be Bundle is coming soon with thrustmaster t-lcm and TGT ???
I think your detective skills could be on to something. Just before Christmas I was able to get a T-GT from B&H Photo for $420.00. Now they’re not selling them anymore. Apparently they reduced the price to clear out their inventory and make room for something new(?). So I came to the same conclusion as you - that there’s possibly a new bundle coming that includes the load cell pedals. Of course this is all just speculation - but I’d hold off on buying a T-GT for a while unless it’s a great deal.

What’s most encouraging is the thought of a load cell being included in an officially licensed GT Sport bundle. That would greatly increase the odds of PD correcting their brake calibration issue. Then I’d probably upgrade to a load cell brake for sure. Although it would most likely be the Ricmotech mod for my T3PA-Pro pedals - not the new “flexy/sloppy” T-LCM pedals
 
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That would greatly increase the odds of PD correcting their brake calibration issue

Owning a set of Fanatec load cell pedals and having used them on GTS the only difference is when you initially start the game you calibrate the brake pedal using the amount of pressure you want to apply for full 100% braking after the game is up and operational.
GTS the brakes work fine but just like the throttle calibration it does not save it in game and calibrates the pedals whenever the game is initially started. I have never seen any problem using the load cell as the game currently handles the calibrations.
 

Gr8_Lakes

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Owning a set of Fanatec load cell pedals and having used them on GTS the only difference is when you initially start the game you calibrate the brake pedal using the amount of pressure you want to apply for full 100% braking after the game is up and operational.
GTS the brakes work fine but just like the throttle calibration it does not save it in game and calibrates the pedals whenever the game is initially started. I have never seen any problem using the load cell as the game currently handles the calibrations.
What happens when you exceed the pressure you initially calibrated? Like for instance, a panic braking situation? I know for a fact the game will recalibrate the brake pedal to that extra pressure. From that point on full braking will require more force. The only way around this is to apply maximum force to the pedal when starting the game (hope you don’t plan on playing long unless it’s leg day), or to have a positive stop that prevents the pedal from traveling past the point you desire to be full braking pressure.

While you’re correct about the initial calibration procedure at game start, the fact is GTSport has a flaw that continues calibrating the brake pedal whenever it sees more force. The initial calibration isn’t “locked in.” So every time you press harder, you just recalibrated maximum braking force. After destroying my low back I realized this, and started experimenting with restarting/recalibration. Sure enough the pedal force would get better/easier, then harder, harder, until I’m having to stand on the brakes for full braking pressure. (Using Thrustmaster’s conical mod). Once I installed a positive stop it corrected the problem and changed the game completely for me. I’ve been in contact with Ricmotech and they informed me this is a programming flaw that would make their load cell inconsistent and difficult to properly calibrate.

https://www.gtplanet.net/forum/threads/t-gt-pedals-conical-brake-mod-no-calibration.377110/
 
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kikie

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what about on ps4
On the PS4 the pedals are compatible with the T-GT, T300 and T150 racing wheel using the RJ12 cable. This means that you have to plug the pedals into a TM wheelbase. On the PS4 the pedals are NOT standalone as on the PC.

12bit when plugged into a TM wheelbase
16bit when plugged directly into the PC using USB

Y
ou can find all the information on the TM website under "features"
 
2,635
United Kingdom
UK
Outspacer
what about on ps4

These will not work with a Logitech wheel using a passive adapter cable, that only works for potentiometer pedals.

In theory a fairly simple active converter could make them work with a Logitech wheel by inverting and voltage matching the signals. Only G29 works with PS4, however.

I think Drivehub should be able to make them work, but of course that's then another chunk of money.
 
1,822
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What happens when you exceed the pressure you initially calibrated? Like for instance, a panic braking situation? I know for a fact the game will recalibrate the brake pedal to that extra pressure. From that point on full braking will require more force.
I guess I do not generally have issues with exceeding the initial maximum brake pressures I set perhaps I factor in a bit of a safety factor in those initial settings. I set the pedal pressures not on the track but with the amount of pressures I know I prefer, maybe that makes a difference.
In GTS I run ABS on weak and with the maximum 100% braking pressures applied you will lock the wheels so I do not find myself on track using that full 100% amount of pressure braking even when needing to stop more in a panic situation to avoid contact with another car.
I find that the system employed by GTS works at a suitable level for me even with a load cell brake. I do like the initial set the controls and the game saves those settings until you change it on the other titles more though of course.
 
938
Switzerland
Zürich
I wonder what is best/more realistic for the brake load cell pedal. Rubber bushings or springs.

It's funny you should mention this as I was thinking about load cells, and it occurred to me that I've never felt a brake pedal in a real car stop dead - there's always a bit of give, even if very slight, but you can feel it.

Now my experience is limited to standard road cars, and road cars without ABS (yeah, I'm old), plus I haven't driven IRL in nearly 14 years - no need to where I live. So, take what I'm saying with a pinch of salt, but...

I was thinking that a load cell with some kind of stiff rubber bung between it and the pedal would possibly give the most realistic feeling, or at least the most realistic feeling that I'm used to.

That said modern, and even older race cars are probably a completely different kettle of fish.
 
680
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GTP-DEADPOOL
Oh you'll be able to tell the difference after 6 months to year if you regularly do sim racing. The truth is the potentiometers are susceptible to dust, and will eventually wear out.

My experience with potentiometer based pedals is that for 6 or so months they're fine, then one or more of the pedals starts spiking. This can be temporarily cured by spraying electronic contact cleaner into the pots, however this needs to be done more and more regularly until after another 6 months the pots need to be completely stripped, cleaned and reassembled. Then after another 6 months they're basically gone, completely worn out. Somehow I just chew through pedal sets.

I would never spend big money on potentiometer based pedals. in fact what I'm doing at the moment is picking up the odd G29 whenever they get discounted so I always have a pedal set in hand - I now have 2 unused wheels, but only one unused pedal set, and my current pedal set is beginning to need regular attention.

I've not yet decided how deep down the rabbit hole I'm going to go with sim racing equipment, and honestly I'm doing perfectly fine with the G29, so a $150 every year to 18 months is not too bad to keep me going. But, if I was to go "High End" then it'll be load cell and hall effect pedals at a minimum.

Ive run potentiometers for years and NEVER had these issues. Mine have worked flawlessly.

This is prolly a case of just cheap potentiometers. Never had these issues with Fanatec.

I wonder what is best/more realistic for the brake load cell pedal. Rubber bushings or springs.

Pretty much all the top pedal sets use a damper and elastomer bushings which is way more realistic than springs.
 
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1,287
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The Planet Dirt (Earth)
I haven't had any problems with the Fanatec CSR pedals I own since installing a Basherboards mod that eliminated the pedals spikes. Before that, the pedals were spiking a lot. I had the pedals for about 8 years or so, but it's time to replace them. These seem interesting enough.

Pretty much all the top pedal sets use a damper and elastomer bushings which is way more realistic than springs.

It's probably just a matter of time until someone makes mod bushings for these. I just wonder if the plastic can take the extra forces the brake would put on it?
 

FPV MIC

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Ive run potentiometers for years and NEVER had these issues. Mine have worked flawlessly.

This is prolly a case of just cheap potentiometers. Never had these issues with Fanatec.
I've never had any issues with pots either. I've seen more issues with Logitech pots than any other brand, but I have seen people having issues with both TM and Fanatec pots too. I wonder if it's more to do with rig placement and/or storage with the last two.
Pretty much all the top pedal sets use a damper and elastomer bushings which is way more realistic than springs.
Elastomers are springs too, just a different type doing the same job.

... and that depends on your definition of ''top pedal sets''. From my own experience with looking at ''top end pedal sets'' the majority are hydraulic like real cars with some being a combination of metal springs and elastomer springs with a damper.

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680
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GTP-DEADPOOL
I've never had any issues with pots either. I've seen more issues with Logitech pots than any other brand, but I have seen people having issues with both TM and Fanatec pots too. I wonder if it's more to do with rig placement and/or storage with the last two.

I have a feeling it’s placement/storage as well.

Elastomers are springs too, just a different type doing the same job.

... and that depends on your definition of ''top pedal sets''. From my own experience with looking at ''top end pedal sets'' the majority are hydraulic like real cars with some being a combination of metal springs and elastomer springs with a damper.

True, though they act different from a “spring”. The top top are hydraulic etc, but the lower end of the top use elastomer/damper combo. I’d love the hydraulic ones but $1k plus for those Tiltons is well past the point of diminishing returns.

I’m planning my upgrade right now, just had a nice lil settlement so I’m getting my orders ready. I’m thinking of going with the Heusinkveld sprint pedals. Slightly more money than the V3’s but not crazy. The ultimates would be great.....but at $850 I’m not sure I’ll notice the difference vs the $500 sprints. At least not enough of a difference to justify the cost.
 

FPV MIC

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I have a feeling it’s placement/storage as well.
👍
True, though they act different from a “spring”.
From what I can gather there isn't much difference, elastomers have slightly more damping but metal springs last longer.

What's the bet TM have made the shaft diameter different to Fanatecs so people can't just swap out the springs for elastomers :lol:
The top top are hydraulic etc, but the lower end of the top use elastomer/damper combo. I’d love the hydraulic ones but $1k plus for those Tiltons is well past the point of diminishing returns.

I’m planning my upgrade right now, just had a nice lil settlement so I’m getting my orders ready. I’m thinking of going with the Heusinkveld sprint pedals. Slightly more money than the V3’s but not crazy. The ultimates would be great.....but at $850 I’m not sure I’ll notice the difference vs the $500 sprints. At least not enough of a difference to justify the cost.
Why not wait to see what Fanatec has in store with their podium pedals? Fair chance they'll work with most of their wheelbases and it'll keep everything console compatible... if that's something you're still looking for going forward :)
 
680
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👍
From what I can gather there isn't much difference, elastomers have slightly more damping but metal springs last longer.

What's the bet TM have made the shaft diameter different to Fanatecs so people can't just swap out the springs for elastomers :lol:
Why not wait to see what Fanatec has in store with their podium pedals? Fair chance they'll work with most of their wheelbases and it'll keep everything console compatible... if that's something you're still looking for going forward :)

Yep the springs last longer but feel unrealistic. The elastomer mimics hydraulics a lot better.

I’m tempted to wait to see what they plan to do with a Podium version of pedals since I’m planning to grab the DD1/PS4. I have my drivehub which would allow others to work, but having everything being the same is nice. I’ll prolly upgrade my wheel and hold off on pedals.
 

kikie

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Why not wait to see what Fanatec has in store with their podium pedals? Fair chance they'll work with most of their wheelbases and it'll keep everything console compatible... if that's something you're still looking for going forward :)
I forgot all about the Podium pedals.
 
938
Switzerland
Zürich
I've never had any issues with pots either. I've seen more issues with Logitech pots than any other brand, but I have seen people having issues with both TM and Fanatec pots too. I wonder if it's more to do with rig placement and/or storage with the last two.

In my case it appears to be wear. I stripped down the pots my now defunct Logitech pedal set and with the brake pot the point on the carbon tracks where the wiper comes into contact with them was worn right through to the board underneath them. The others also showed significant wear as well.
 
I have a feeling it’s placement/storage as well.



True, though they act different from a “spring”. The top top are hydraulic etc, but the lower end of the top use elastomer/damper combo. I’d love the hydraulic ones but $1k plus for those Tiltons is well past the point of diminishing returns.

I’m planning my upgrade right now, just had a nice lil settlement so I’m getting my orders ready. I’m thinking of going with the Heusinkveld sprint pedals. Slightly more money than the V3’s but not crazy. The ultimates would be great.....but at $850 I’m not sure I’ll notice the difference vs the $500 sprints. At least not enough of a difference to justify the cost.


well to me as a bike racer a perfect brake should feel mechanical, ie no sponginess or anything like that. My tip for anybody wanting a hydraulic brake is to just try to buy cheap mtb hydraulic brakes and mod the T-LCM brake pedal so that the piston pushes against the loadcell. Dont really know much much pressure such a cheap hydraulic brake kit can manage though.

Another thing one might use is a hydraulic clutch from an old junk bike.
 
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kikie

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well to me as a bike racer a perfect brake should feel mechanical, ie no sponginess or anything like that. My tip for anybody wanting a hydraulic brake is to just try to buy cheap mtb hydraulic brakes and mod the T-LCM brake pedal so that the piston pushes against the loadcell. Dont really know much much pressure such a cheap hydraulic brake kit can manage though.

Another thing one might use is a hydraulic clutch from an old junk bike.
I had this idea years ago. The mountain bike shop told me that a hydraulic brake is too weak to be operated with your food. Your leg muscles are much stronger than your fingers.

You could buy a second-hand brake calliper at a scrapyard put elastomers between the callipers pistons and between the elastomers the load cell et voilà you have an authentic hydraulic brake system.
 
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United Kingdom
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I had this idea years ago. The mountain bike shop told me that a hydraulic brake is too weak to be operated with your food. Your leg muscles are much stronger than your fingers.

I think that would be true if you were planning to simply mount the master cylinder to your base platform, and then the bike brake lever to the back of your foot pedal, but that doesn't mean the idea is a total write off...

You'd just need to design the geometry of the pedal to master cylinder mechanism, and the caliper to loadcell mechanism such that the total mechanical advantage ratio* gives a decent feel at the pedal, and an output force in a range that is somewhat near what the loadcell would be expecting.

* including any difference in area between master cylinder piston and caliper piston(s)

I've got a spare front brake setup from my old KTM dirt bike which I'm considering doing similar with, but it hasn't made it to the top of the projects list yet. Obviously it's a bit beefier than a pedal bike setup, but mostly the same considerations apply...
 
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Woof that lateral play at 10:18 is pretty excessive IMO. Someone needs to make some bushings or something to fix that.

That will be very driver dependent. Some are very light on the brake pedal or not very sensitive and might never notice. But for those of us who are heavy on the brakes or do heel/toe that’s going to be very distracting.

Nice to see someone finally did a video showing that.
 

FPV MIC

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Woof that lateral play at 10:18 is pretty excessive IMO. Someone needs to make some bushings or something to fix that.

That will be very driver dependent. Some are very light on the brake pedal or not very sensitive and might never notice. But for those of us who are heavy on the brakes or do heel/toe that’s going to be very distracting.

Nice to see someone finally did a video showing that.
:odd: I time stamped a review last week showing that exact same movement in our previous discussion. You seem to be just repeating what I've said.
As I mentioned earlier I don't think that movement is coming from the base (that's why I addressed the base flex this time). It looks to be coming from the plastic bushings not fitting quite tightly enough and that could possibly be overcome with shims.

Check this video and it shows very clearly where the movement is coming from, and with pressure this light it would not be the base flexing:
Using my crystal ball I can see aftermarket bushings in the very near future :sly:... or a version 2.
 
680
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:odd: I time stamped a review last week showing that exact same movement in our previous discussion. You seem to be just repeating what I've said.

I missed that, but yeah we already discussed the need for it, I was simply reiterating that.