Uber Taxi: What do you actually think about it?

  • Thread starter FoRiZon
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20,678
TenEightyOne
TenEightyOne
Most taxi laws here require a taxi to be a dedicated taxi and not a personal car...

That's maybe why Brits don't see the problem, here we have two very different things; taxis and "private hire". I've used taxis very rarely and then only when I can bill my employer for the journey - they're very expensive. The good thing about a taxi is that you can flag one down on the street. Private-hire cars have to be pre-booked (although most will let you phone their office to book when you flag them down with a kebab in your hand) and are generally much cheaper.

I do wonder however how a British Uber driver's insurance works; I checked my own insurance policy earlier (exciting times, no?) and it specifically excludes cover for "journeys for hire or reward". Still, there's no need to have a clean licence to be an Uber driver and you don't (as far as I know) have to have your car inspected to a private-hire or taxi standard.
 

Dotini

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CR80_Shifty
I do wonder however how a British Uber driver's insurance works; I checked my own insurance policy earlier (exciting times, no?) and it specifically excludes cover for "journeys for hire or reward". Still, there's no need to have a clean licence to be an Uber driver and you don't (as far as I know) have to have your car inspected to a private-hire or taxi standard.

Good issues identified.

No insurance and no brakes?
 

Liquid

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Bratvegas
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What the criteria for becoming a licenced taxi in Bratislava are, I don't know, but taxis in Bratislava using the shared economy of a taxi app (not Uber in this case, it's called Hop In) are actual taxis from the genuine companies. I live on a short road and the bit outside my building's front door is where most of the taxis park when they don't have a pick up.

It's also about 50 yards from the entrance to the old town so they either wait for a drunk tourist to flag one and proceed to mug said tourist with extraordinary fees, or they wait for a pick up to come through on their phone/tablet and go off to find them. All the taxi drivers have a phone or tablet with their version of the app, waiting for something to come through.

It's a handy system, I have to admit.
 

DK

No-one's having an A1 day
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driftking18594
CiaranGTR94
We have something similar to Hop In in Ireland called Hailo. In fact, I just looked it up...it turns out they're from London.
 
9,401
Australia
Western Sydney
mustafur
Im a uber driver, and to me atleast it seems like the best thing since sliced bread, it soo much cheaper then a taxi and the service is surpiror, Taxis have held a monopoly for far too long and have clearly taken advantage of the customers in the process, and thats how uber has a market.

The biggest arguments against uber are more or less to do with regulations that shouldn't exists and are purely there to protect the taxi industry, they do nothing to supply a good service to the customer.
 

Dotini

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Where I live the transportation system is very challenged, despite costing a royal fortune.

Institutions and people are experimenting with many ways of getting around on a budget, and the Uber idea is one of them. It doesn't really seem sustainable in the long run, but so what, nothing is. I'm ok with it, but clearly its symptomatic of deeper infrastructure and economic problems.
 
830
Australia
Australia
Soulfresh-ACV
I agree that Taxis worldwide could definitely up their service level. I like the idea of Uber, however it's unfair for licensed operators it's not in a level playing field.

Personally I don't see this going to last long in it's current form. It might be able to sustain the legal fees/fines for Uber drivers thus far but that can't go on forever.
 
20,678
TenEightyOne
TenEightyOne
I agree that Taxis worldwide could definitely up their service level. I like the idea of Uber, however it's unfair for licensed operators it's not in a level playing field.

A couple of days ago I applied to be a Uber driver on their website. I was never planning to take fares, just to see how it all worked. Firstly; Uber hold the journey insurance (not vehicle insurance) so the PLI is covered there. Secondly, in the UK at least, I needed to provide details of my Private Hire licence. I don't have one though... so that was the end of that. I simply hadn't realised that one was required in the UK and now I'm wondering if the whole "they're not licensed!" argument is bunkum in other places too.

The main differences as far as I can see are that the local authority don't hold you to ransom for anything other than PH license issue and that your car doesn't need to pass anything other than the standard Ministry of Transport test (as all newer cars in the UK do).

I guess there's more advantage in running a legal banger with Uber as you can do high mileage and not worry about losing the replacement payout if you get totalled with passengers in.
 

Keef

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Dayton, OH
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My buddies and I have used Uber several times here in Columbus. Cheap, easy, works great. Much better and nicer and cleaner than a regular taxi.

We also have CoGo bike rentals, Car2Go Smart cars and besides the typical city-wide bus service there are a couple notable routes geared toward moving people in hotspots. Traffic is still miserable, however.

Where I live the transportation system is very challenged, despite costing a royal fortune.

Institutions and people are experimenting with many ways of getting around on a budget, and the Uber idea is one of them. It doesn't really seem sustainable in the long run, but so what, nothing is. I'm ok with it, but clearly its symptomatic of deeper infrastructure and economic problems.
It will certainly be sustainable come the day governments realize they simply can't afford the ridiculously massive infrastructure and public transport systems they've created.
 

FoolKiller

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I agree that Taxis worldwide could definitely up their service level. I like the idea of Uber, however it's unfair for licensed operators it's not in a level playing field.
The taxi companies wanted these rules so that some shmoe with a few cars couldn't come along and create competition. In many of the cities in the US they lobbied for rules to have certain kinds of licenses or medallions that were limited. It has been in the interest of the taxi companies to make it so that it would cost a quarter million dollars to become a driver. No one could come in and compete with them.

If the taxi companies are worried about fairness and level playing fields they shouldn't have worked to make it so unleveled that no one could compete with them in their own business.
 
830
Australia
Australia
Soulfresh-ACV
The taxi companies wanted these rules so that some shmoe with a few cars couldn't come along and create competition. In many of the cities in the US they lobbied for rules to have certain kinds of licenses or medallions that were limited. It has been in the interest of the taxi companies to make it so that it would cost a quarter million dollars to become a driver. No one could come in and compete with them.

If the taxi companies are worried about fairness and level playing fields they shouldn't have worked to make it so unleveled that no one could compete with them in their own business.
Fair point. However, just bare in mind that this is pretty much like all primitive public transport systems, from taxis to buses, trains/subways. Too often, governments tend to legislate certain laws in industries for revenue and political reasons. Unfortunately it's the reality and the sad state of democracies in most developed nations. That's why political donations are still allowed even though I do not agree such practise without a donation cap per political party and as a result, we are mostly stuck with two groups of politicians which most of us do not like and does not represent the community.

Anyway, like I'd said in another response that I think Uber won't last long as a result. Legislations will be implemented every government to protect their revenue stream from the taxi/ public transport industry.
 

Cale

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CaleDeRoo
I used Uber Black Car my entire LA Vacation. Never once had a problem and it was much better than me getting lost on public transport.
 

FoolKiller

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Anyway, like I'd said in another response that I think Uber won't last long as a result. Legislations will be implemented every government to protect their revenue stream from the taxi/ public transport industry.
Many cities have already figure out what regulations to create and they are now fully accepted. Smaller cities are running into problems where they can't appear to be trying to grow while restricting the things that larger cities are doing.

In the US I have observed that once LA and New York do something (big bonus if Chicago does too) it is only a matter of time before it spreads around. This goes for regulations, , fashion trends, and businesses. It isn't 100%. New York gun laws will never happen in Texas, for example, but if you look at Keef talking about the bike rental services and other things and these were all ideas that started in the larger coastal cities.

And if Uber can't get a good footing in Europe or Australia? It isn't like the US is a small market. They'll spread faster in the US and regulators will struggle to keep up, allowing consumers to grow to love them and politicians having to publicly choose between guys that likely fund their campaign and the voters themselves. They will also face off against groups like Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), because someone who doesn't like a taxi or can't afford one might drive home if alternatives like Uber don't exist. MADD even worked with Uber to test the theory. So, a politician would have to anger the people that actually vote for them, risk being accused of endangering lives, and face a large non-profit lobbying group all in order to appease one industry in their city.

We already have multiple companies like Uber operating in the US. It is already successful and popular enough to support more than one business in this field.


I think the one thing that the US has going for Uber is that public transportation here is not like it is in other areas of the world. You either have places where cars are everywhere and public transportation is mostly only used by people who are poor or you have so many people that no amount of public transportation eases congestion. Taking the bus locally to me means possibly sitting next to someone who is smelly, getting an evil look from that rough looking guy with his group of friends, getting something sticky on you, and many other undesirable things. And there are so few taxis that you must call in advance because waving one down as it drives past could mean a long wait before seeing one.
 
20,678
TenEightyOne
TenEightyOne
To be fair, this happens at my place.

The difference is that the Governor also involved. They just want the tax and obligations like the normal taxi, though.

Doesn't make it fair :)

Only On 2
A Los Angeles Department of Transportation spokesperson confirms the agency participates in these types of operations, along with the LAPD. He says Uber drivers, and many others — such as limo drivers for example — are subject to arrest if a ride isn’t pre-arranged.

Is there a legal precedent for separation of pre-arrangement? Private Hire cabs in the UK have no problem with you ringing the office from the back seat but they wouldn't be allowed to drive anywhere while you did so. In this case the Uber cars didn't move, from what I read? To my mind no journey took place...
 
9,401
Australia
Western Sydney
mustafur
Doesn't make it fair :)



Is there a legal precedent for separation of pre-arrangement? Private Hire cabs in the UK have no problem with you ringing the office from the back seat but they wouldn't be allowed to drive anywhere while you did so. In this case the Uber cars didn't move, from what I read? To my mind no journey took place...

If the car didn't move how can the police have anycase, are they going to fine everyone that has a random just hop into their car without approval.

I must admit though I have done that alot as well, where they get in and then request the trip after to make sure that it is me that picks them up(Mostly if it's a person that needs to stop somewhere for awhile then needs someone to take them elsewhere or a person I know)..

I have never done it with a random though, and i wouldn't move if it happened.
 

Robin

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So UBER has inexplicably changed it logo...to the stupidest nonsensical thing in history. Seriously people get paid for this? It now looks like a bank logo.

30D3992600000578-3428998-image-m-13_1454453519723.jpg

30D3992F00000578-3428998-The_iconic_U_is_now_a_circle_with_a_square_in_the_middle_set_on_-a-16_1454453653589.jpg
 
2,726
United Kingdom
England
ECGadget
Eh???
What in the world is that?? I dislike Uber, now I dislike it more. Their previous logo was sleek, simple but eyecatching. This is just... lame.
 

FoRiZon

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So UBER has inexplicably changed it logo...to the stupidest nonsensical thing in history. Seriously people get paid for this? It now looks like a bank logo.

30D3992600000578-3428998-image-m-13_1454453519723.jpg

30D3992F00000578-3428998-The_iconic_U_is_now_a_circle_with_a_square_in_the_middle_set_on_-a-16_1454453653589.jpg
More like NFC logo than Uber.
What in the world is that?? I dislike Uber, now I dislike it more. Their previous logo was sleek, simple but eyecatching. This is just... lame.
Why are you disliking Uber?
 
2,726
United Kingdom
England
ECGadget
Eh???
Why are you disliking Uber?

Coming from a Kingdom in which the traditional black cab is a part of culture, Uber represents a threat to it, using technology to compete against hard working people, such as cabbies in London who memorise thousands of streets and locations before they even hit the streets. The same way, I dislike Bendy-Buses because the replaced the classic double deckers. Glad they all but gone. Uber though is not something that can coexist with traditional cabs. In my opinion it seeks to trump them all and I do not like that
 

FoRiZon

(Banned)
8,645
Singapore
Singapore

Coming from a Kingdom in which the traditional black cab is a part of culture, Uber represents a threat to it, using technology to compete against hard working people, such as cabbies in London who memorise thousands of streets and locations before they even hit the streets. The same way, I dislike Bendy-Buses because the replaced the classic double deckers. Glad they all but gone. Uber though is not something that can coexist with traditional cabs. In my opinion it seeks to trump them all and I do not like that
Well black cabs can join the online reservation advantage if they want to. No?
 

Johnnypenso

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Johnnypenso
Coming from a Kingdom in which the traditional black cab is a part of culture, Uber represents a threat to it, using technology to compete against hard working people, such as cabbies in London who memorise thousands of streets and locations before they even hit the streets. The same way, I dislike Bendy-Buses because the replaced the classic double deckers. Glad they all but gone. Uber though is not something that can coexist with traditional cabs. In my opinion it seeks to trump them all and I do not like that
Aren't the people who drive for Uber also hard working? Doesn't GPS replace having to memorize all the street names?
 

Robin

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United Kingdom
United Kingdom
The UK has a very well regionally serviced system where you ring a local company and a licenced private car comes and picks you up (it's colloquially called a minicab service). The drivers are all local and the dispatcher will give you the price, name of the driver, car type and even the licence plate if you want. It's basically UBER and has no disadvantages compared to it so I don't see the difference/appeal.
 
20,678
TenEightyOne
TenEightyOne
The UK has a very well regionally serviced system where you ring a local company and a licenced private car comes and picks you up (it's colloquially called a minicab service). The drivers are all local and the dispatcher will give you the price, name of the driver, car type and even the licence plate if you want. It's basically UBER and has no disadvantages compared to it so I don't see the difference/appeal.

And they're just around the corner. At least they always are when I ring to find out why they're late...
 
5,783
Canada
On the run
NaveekDarkroom
Recently, Taxi unions at Paris going full riot over Ubers Pop Service. Its main concerns because of Uber decision not to pay taxes. Previously, several countries are also banned Uber. Whetever the same case or different such as the kidnapping on India or dirty business practices on several American cities.

Personally, what do you think about Uber? Do you actually uses one? Do you have an opinion about it?

Personally, its a generous service, if it just follows regulations, paid taxes, and more communication to the existing union :)
I have nothing against Uber as long as they don't do anything too shady. I'm not sure about not choosing to pay taxes. I don't think Uber exists where I have, but I would be okay with it being around. I probably wouldn't use it much, but I'm sure others would appreciate it. If a single Uber driver breaks the law or something, it should be driver held responsible, and not necessarily the organization itself.