Words I Hate

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21,555
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TexRex72
Tremendous...

trump spoiled it for me.

"...the likes which..."

Anything this fool touches or says or does... I just despise it...
You really shouldn't give the whiny little bitch that kind of power.
 

Jimlaad43

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"Pingdemic"

A word that the media are starting to use as they pander to the idiots who keep moaning about having to self-isolate after being "pinged" by a Contact Tracing app. A horrible word in itself used to describe a problem brought about by people trying to ignore that the pandemic still exists in the UK and that prevention and self-isolation is still vastly important if they ever want to get back to pre-pandemic normality.
 
327
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I don't mind this in the context of money or [often promotional] goods, but yeah, using it as a shortened form of "swagger" or some other contemporary slang iteration just might get you punched.
For me, SWAG is an acronym for Scientific/Sophisticated Wild-Ass Guess. It's used a pretty good bit in long range shooting. Can be used in conjunction with Kentucky windage.

For me, I'm really starting to hate the word "systemic". Like.....REALLY hate it.
 
21,555
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TexRex72
For me, I'm really starting to hate the word "systemic". Like.....REALLY hate it.
Why? It just refers to many parts of or the whole of something. For example, a systemic disease is one that affects multiple organs or regions of the body, or the entire body, instead of a particular organ or region. Contrast with "local."
 

CLowndes888

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"Pingdemic"

A word that the media are starting to use as they pander to the idiots who keep moaning about having to self-isolate after being "pinged" by a Contact Tracing app. A horrible word in itself used to describe a problem brought about by people trying to ignore that the pandemic still exists in the UK and that prevention and self-isolation is still vastly important if they ever want to get back to pre-pandemic normality.
The word "ping" has a different meaning for me...
 

Wolfe

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For me, SWAG is an acronym for Scientific/Sophisticated Wild-Ass Guess. It's used a pretty good bit in long range shooting.
Ah, that might explain why I picked it up from my gun-enthusiast father-in-law using it so much.
 
510
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schlafhund
It's, like, completely lost, like, its actual, like, meaning. This thing, like, happens to a few words, like, every so often but, like, it usually, like, dies down after, like, a couple of years.
Nailed it.
 

UKMikey

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It's, like, completely lost, like, its actual, like, meaning. This thing, like, happens to a few words, like, every so often but, like, it usually, like, dies down after, like, a couple of years.
Perhaps if you could point to some examples of "literally" being overused as much as "like" I think this argument would carry more weight. It's not a verbal tic like "like" or "you know", far as I'm aware.

I looked back on my own use of the word and it seems only to have been used in its (dare I say it) literal sense.

I could be wrong about other people though and it could be another of those words like invariably which is invariably used to mean variably. But this is nothing new.

 
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Liquid

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Perhaps if you could point to some examples of "literally" being overused as much as "like" I think this argument would carry more weight.
I was literally only saying it's like what, like, happened to like. 😉
 

UKMikey

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I was literally only saying it's like what, like, happened to like. 😉
Serves me right for taking you literally.

That reminds me of a rude joke I told on video once. It didn't get many likes but there are over thirty in the video.

 
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21,555
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TexRex72
I've never seen literally used as a filler word, as indicated above. When used in the "incorrect" context, to mean figuratively, it acts as an intensifier, but it's usually not difficult to determine whether it's been used in this manner or as it's traditionally been defined.

If I'm honest, I appreciate that its use has evolved in this way. It shows how dynamic language is.
 
3,239
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Indiana
DolphDrago
I see it used pretty often, sometimes correctly, many times incorrectly. It's become so ingrained in American lexicon that the show Parks and Rec had a character who would use it literally all the time. :lol:
 

UKMikey

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My bad. I didn't realise it was a thing on shows I've literally never watched. :lol:
 
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TexRex72
2B9.gif
 

Liquid

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wholesome

Had its time but it's done. Overused sugary gooey gooeyness. Stop using it.
 
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Swagger897

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It's, like, completely lost, like, its actual, like, meaning. This thing, like, happens to a few words, like, every so often but, like, it usually, like, dies down after, like, a couple of years.
I was probably early teens when my dad pointed it out to me once that i said it a few times in one sentence. Kinda took a step back and realized that yeah, I used it waaaay too much. It was like, one of those life changing moments ya know ;)
 
1,136
United Kingdom
The Pool Of Life.
It's, like, completely lost, like, its actual, like, meaning. This thing, like, happens to a few words, like, every so often but, like, it usually, like, dies down after, like, a couple of years.
Where I live, there is a certain type of young male adult who, when talking to someone, either face to face or on the phone will use the word 'Lad' in a similar way to like above.

"Hey lad, we're going into town lad. Listen lad, when we get there we're going to the pub to have a few pints lad." 😲 Every sentence seems to have at least one, often multiple 'lad's'. And this is mostly with people they know. I most often hear it when I am on the Bus, and they are talking to people face to face, or more irritatingly, very loudly over the phone. 🙄:banghead:

I'm not sure if it is a specific thing to the area I live, Liverpool, or UK wide. UK readers will have probably heard someone from Liverpool using the word, but believe me when I say you have not heard it in its natural habitat from those with limited vocabulary, and limited imagination. :mad: It makes you want to scream at them when someone is doing it, and if I were not s**t scared of getting beat up by a young male adult, of course I would. 🤣

It is weird, as I don't use the word like that, and don't know anyone that does, thankfully. 😉
 

Liquid

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"Hey lad, we're going into town lad. Listen lad, when we get there we're going to the pub to have a few pints lad." 😲 Every sentence seems to have at least one, often multiple 'lad's'.
That's overuse of the vocative (meaning: identifying the person you're talking to). Completely unnecessary in English no matter how streetwise your slang is. It's common to use non-specific vocative identifiers like lad, kid, mate, mush, lid, guv, skip, chief etc. It gets ridiculous if you do it whilst continuing to use that person's name over and over:

Hey, Dave, we're going into town, Dave. Listen, Dave, when we get there we're going to the pub to have a few pints, Dave.
Hey, Abbey, we're going into town, Abbey. Listen, Abbey, when we get there we're going to the pub to have a few pints, Abbey.
 
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Liquid

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One interesting* thing about English vocative is that that's what O, as opposed to oh, is for.

O brother, where art thou?
The brother is being addressed by the speaker.

You've made a mistake this time, o foolish one.
The foolish one is being addressed by the speaker.

Now there's a mess everywhere thanks to you, o splashed milk of mine!
The milk is being addressed by the speaker.

*terms & conditions apply
 
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polysmut

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Where I live, there is a certain type of young male adult who, when talking to someone, either face to face or on the phone will use the word 'Lad' in a similar way to like above.

"Hey lad, we're going into town lad. Listen lad, when we get there we're going to the pub to have a few pints lad." 😲 Every sentence seems to have at least one, often multiple 'lad's'. And this is mostly with people they know. I most often hear it when I am on the Bus, and they are talking to people face to face, or more irritatingly, very loudly over the phone. 🙄:banghead:

I'm not sure if it is a specific thing to the area I live, Liverpool, or UK wide. UK readers will have probably heard someone from Liverpool using the word, but believe me when I say you have not heard it in its natural habitat from those with limited vocabulary, and limited imagination. :mad: It makes you want to scream at them when someone is doing it, and if I were not s**t scared of getting beat up by a young male adult, of course I would. 🤣

It is weird, as I don't use the word like that, and don't know anyone that does, thankfully. 😉
I've heard people from Liverpool pronounce it as lah more than lad.
 
1,136
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The Pool Of Life.
I've heard people from Liverpool pronounce it as lah more than lad.
Yep, some do, and that is most times in response to a situation, or a reply to someone, and in a more light hearted off hand way thinking about it. Which I never really did before. 🤔😄 Again, it is not a word I use.
 

DK

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I've noticed a disturbing increase in the use of "hollibobs" here in Ireland over the past couple of years, particularly among 30-something women. It's just cringeworthy. I can understand saying it to a baby/toddler, but not in a conversation with anyone older...and especially not in ads, but of course advertising teams here are just filled with failspawn who've been relegated from the UK market.