WRC 10 Preview: Fast Six Over Crest

Famine

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Rally nerd incoming: although the two often correlate, the numbers in the pace notes refer to the severity of the corner, not the gear you should be in. Beyond hyped for this game.
Depends on the pace-note system - some use 1-9 (hairpin to flat), and some use 9-1, but 1-5 and 1-6 are most common as far as I know.

I also don't recall it being told to players at any point in WRC9 (I might have missed it, found the game frustratingly twitchy) and of course it isn't in the demo at all.
 
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MagpieRacer

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Rally nerd incoming: although the two often correlate, the numbers in the pace notes refer to the severity of the corner, not the gear you should be in. Beyond hyped for this game.

Typically, British drivers prefer a gear based pace note system. Colin Mcrae, Richard Burns, Malcolm Wilson, Jon Armstrong among many others use 1-6 as a gear format. The likes of Ogier, Loeb, Tanak, they use corner severity.

Games tend to use the gear based pace note system for simplicity, the WRC games, Dirt Rally, Rally Evo all used this. The last game I can think of that didn't, off the top of my head is Richard Burns Rally which used a relatively simple corner severity system.
 
246
England
Merseyside
Depends on the pace-note system - some use 1-9 (hairpin to flat), and some use 9-1, but 1-5 and 1-6 are most common as far as I know.

I also don't recall it being told to players at any point in WRC9 (I might have missed it, found the game frustratingly twitchy) and of course it isn't in the demo at all.

Typically, British drivers prefer a gear based pace note system. Colin Mcrae, Richard Burns, Malcolm Wilson, Jon Armstrong among many others use 1-6 as a gear format. The likes of Ogier, Loeb, Tanak, they use corner severity.

Games tend to use the gear based pace note system for simplicity, the WRC games, Dirt Rally, Rally Evo all used this. The last game I can think of that didn't, off the top of my head is Richard Burns Rally which used a relatively simple corner severity system.

Regardless of number scale or ascending/descending, it's still corner severity over gears. A gear system doesn't work and pretty much no one uses it. You often see crews on a recce with numbers on their steering wheel, to aid the writing of pace notes. A 3 left is still a 3 left, regardless of whether you're driving a 4-speed Mini or a 7-speed Escort Cosworth. Similarly, a hairpin may immediately be followed by a short 4 right, which you're never going to take in 4th gear no matter what you're driving or how quick you're driving it.

Often on pace-noted events that don't allow for recce runs, a set of standard pace notes will be available to buy for the event, that will be the same for crews in WRC machines as they are for the 1-litre Micras.
 

MagpieRacer

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Regardless of number scale or ascending/descending, it's still corner severity over gears. A gear system doesn't work and pretty much no one uses it. You often see crews on a recce with numbers on their steering wheel, to aid the writing of pace notes. A 3 left is still a 3 left, regardless of whether you're driving a 4-speed Mini or a 7-speed Escort Cosworth. Similarly, a hairpin may immediately be followed by a short 4 right, which you're never going to take in 4th gear no matter what you're driving or how quick you're driving it.

Often on pace-noted events that don't allow for recce runs, a set of standard pace notes will be available to buy for the event, that will be the same for crews in WRC machines as they are for the 1-litre Micras.

Not true. Its called the Mcrae-in-Gear system and was very widely used through the 90s and 2000s, particularly favored by British drivers, such as Colin Mcrae, hence the name. Whilst it isn't as widely used now, it is still used and is my preferred system. Naturally due to how gearing works it does line up with corner severity anyway for the most part.

British Club and descriptive systems are also relatively on the way out, British Club used 1-5 with 1 being flat and 5 being almost hairpin and descriptive was a preference of Burns and Solberg in the late 90s early 2000s, using terms like fast, medium, K, Flat etc to describe the turns.

Modern WRC drivers sway between the degree system and more in depth Club system with numbers as high as 9 on top of descriptive corners. Loeb uses a degree based system whilst Ogier uses a mix of degrees and description. Evans uses corner severity from 1 to 9 similar to the Club system but going a lot more detailed with the numbering (as you would expect at the top level).

The notes thay can be bought as standardised on no recce events, again is dependant on the country and event, the Jemba inertia system is widely used at national level, feel free to read about it here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jemba_Inertia_Notes_System

For other events, it is again down to the organisers, there's no one de facto system that gets used, most standard notes will be based off either the Mcrae-in-Gear system or a simple severity system similar to the Jemba notes.

The Dirt Rally games associations through the past with Colin Mcrae and his various co-drivers have led Codemasters to favour his gear based system, the WRC game system is almost identical to this.
 
246
England
Merseyside
Not true. Its called the Mcrae-in-Gear system and was very widely used through the 90s and 2000s, particularly favored by British drivers, such as Colin Mcrae, hence the name. Whilst it isn't as widely used now, it is still used and is my preferred system. Naturally due to how gearing works it does line up with corner severity anyway for the most part.

British Club and descriptive systems are also relatively on the way out, British Club used 1-5 with 1 being flat and 5 being almost hairpin and descriptive was a preference of Burns and Solberg in the late 90s early 2000s, using terms like fast, medium, K, Flat etc to describe the turns.

Modern WRC drivers sway between the degree system and more in depth Club system with numbers as high as 9 on top of descriptive corners. Loeb uses a degree based system whilst Ogier uses a mix of degrees and description. Evans uses corner severity from 1 to 9 similar to the Club system but going a lot more detailed with the numbering (as you would expect at the top level).

The notes thay can be bought as standardised on no recce events, again is dependant on the country and event, the Jemba inertia system is widely used at national level, feel free to read about it here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jemba_Inertia_Notes_System

For other events, it is again down to the organisers, there's no one de facto system that gets used, most standard notes will be based off either the Mcrae-in-Gear system or a simple severity system similar to the Jemba notes.

The Dirt Rally games associations through the past with Colin Mcrae and his various co-drivers have led Codemasters to favour his gear based system, the WRC game system is almost identical to this.
Your man here lays it down. I think the confusion here may be between pace notes and route notes, as the guy from Codies rightly points out rally games use route notes, not pace notes.

http://blog.codemasters.com/dirt/04/co-driver-calls-explained/

The key thing to remember with these calls is that they are not Pace Notes. Pace Notes are written on recces and are very personal to the crews that create them and the car they are using. The calls we have created are Route Notes and they are designed to describe the road as best as possible. This makes them much more consistent and far less subjective, as a result they are a much better fit for the broad spectrum of rally cars that you will be able to drive on our stages.


People often describe the 1-6 system by saying that the numbers are the gear you should be in to take the corner but that is not strictly true. Sometimes you will go from a tight Right One into a fast Left Six but the chances are that you won’t have dropped into first gear for the Right One and you won’t have picked up enough speed to be in sixth gear by the time you get to the Left Six.
 
276
Canada
Alberta
I really love the historical car roster, and I'm really glad to see that they've included 205 T16 Evo 1 as well as Evo 2. So many games just tend to go for Evo 2 and pretend that Evo 1 doesn't exist, but personally I've always liked Evo 1 a lot more since it looks more similar to its homologation road-going equivalent.
 
55
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
The PC demo on steam now is a right mess… Thrustmaster T300 wheel not recognised, neither are the Tlcm pedals.

A number of crashes to desktop and flashing backgrounds etc.

Tried to play it on the keyboard, with some difficulty… felt like I was back in the 80’s on my ZX Spectrum :(
 
43
Canada
Montreal
JavaTheNutt
For those who have tried the demo on PC, how does it compare to DR2 this time? I've considered the past couple WRC titles but never budged since they don't seem to offer as good gravel physics as DR2.
 
611
New Zealand
NZL
colinnola
I had a quick go of this demo and the game seems fine. The WRC cars feel good on tarmac and okay on gravel (I prefer DR2; cars feel more responsive).

The game seems to work well on my modest machine, and my G29 was recognized with no issues.
 
246
England
Merseyside
For those who have tried the demo on PC, how does it compare to DR2 this time? I've considered the past couple WRC titles but never budged since they don't seem to offer as good gravel physics as DR2.
9 is fantastic, and I really rate the physics all round especially in the WRC cars. The cars really seem to 'bite' into the surface, especially on dry gravel, and the effects of dips and bumps in the turns on weight transfer is very realistic. Even with only a couple of months til 10, I'd recommend getting 9 even if it's just for the Germany stages. The sense of speed is incredible.
 
4,108
Ireland
Warwick, UK
PJTierney
PJTierney
Games tend to use the gear based pace note system for simplicity, the WRC games, Dirt Rally, Rally Evo all used this.
DiRT's is severity.

Gear system hasn't been used for Codemasters titles since the Coin McRae games back in the day. DiRT Rally was built with the severity system in mind.
 
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43
Canada
Montreal
JavaTheNutt
9 is fantastic, and I really rate the physics all round especially in the WRC cars. The cars really seem to 'bite' into the surface, especially on dry gravel, and the effects of dips and bumps in the turns on weight transfer is very realistic. Even with only a couple of months til 10, I'd recommend getting 9 even if it's just for the Germany stages. The sense of speed is incredible.

Love the German stages in DR2, especially with the R5 class. The WRC cars must be even more thrilling around there.
 
246
England
Merseyside
Love the German stages in DR2, especially with the R5 class. The WRC cars must be even more thrilling around there.
Honestly, and I say this as a big fan of DR2 and the Baumholder stages, the Mittelmosel location in WRC 9 absolutely blows the DR2 stages away. So much variation in road surface, width, scenery, corners etc, it's amazing.
 

MagpieRacer

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Honestly, and I say this as a big fan of DR2 and the Baumholder stages, the Mittelmosel location in WRC 9 absolutely blows the DR2 stages away. So much variation in road surface, width, scenery, corners etc, it's amazing.

See I feel the opposite. Generally I prefer the stages in WRC9 just for the detail and challenge but Germaby for me is much better in DR2. Just my opinion of course, I just prefer the high speed flow of them over WRC9s.
 
587
United States
Farbanti, Erusea
I'm excited for this, I can't say I have ever played a full on rally game before. Looking forward to getting the platinum.
 
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