What does camber do?

Discussion in 'GT5 Tuning Forum' started by E-cobra, Apr 3, 2011.

  1. E-cobra

    london
    PSN:E-cobra

    I have been trying to understand what camber does exactly in the game and I am having a lot of trouble. At first I thought if you increased rear camber it caused more understeer and if you increased front camber it increased oversteer but on testing I found if you increased rear camber car was more unstable during braking and turning and I did'nt notice anything with front camber settings. I could really use the help. Thanks
  2. budious

    PSN:budious

    Camber does work the way you summarized it above but only if you have tuned other aspects of your car correctly. Camber is subjective to damper, anti-roll bar, spring rates but generally you should always see gains if you use values under 2.0 to trim handling. You only go over 2.0 if the track requires it and you have dialed-in or are willing to re-tune the car.
  3. E-cobra

    london
    PSN:E-cobra

    Thats the thing though because i just bought a 787B and the camber settings were above 2 as standard. (This is the car I tested camber settings with and got the results i stated) but i also tested with my ford gt test car and i found that increased rear camber caused understeer to a certain point and increased front camber caused oversteer to a certain point so it left me confused again. any ideas?
  4. budious

    PSN:budious

    "To a certain point" because against a flat surface, once beyond a threshold, depending on your other settings, the tire will begin to lose too much grip so it has the opposite effect. Going over 2.0 is generally more useful on courses with cambered corners than it is on flatter courses.
  5. Jesus

    Kazakhstan England

    Basically the camber effects how much tyre is in contact with the road. If you select the question mark icon on the suspension settings it explains everything you want to know.
  6. oopssorryy

    Ohio
    PSN:oops_sorryy

    Camber slightly tilts the top of your tire in while tilting the bottom your the tire out. This, to a point, increases the amount of tire you have on the road while cornering. This obviously will enhance your cars cornering abilities up to a point. But be warned, you can't gain something without loosing something somewhere else. By adding camber (It's all negative in GT5) you reduce the amount of tire you have on the road. This will effect your acceleration and your braking in a negative way. The key is finding a balance in between the two, and that can be some what difficult. I start tuning a car with a setting of -1 and increase or decrease this setting by .5 by what the car does. It's best to tune camber last, as if your car doesn't have a good set up it it won't turn, brake, or accelerate the way you want it to, not matter what kind of camber you put on it.
  7. Ronald6

    United States Portland / Or /
    PSN:Barefoot_Driver

    Picture a wheel/tyre from behind. On a flat surface the bottom of the tyre (with a "flat" inflation) will be in full contact with the ground. As a car goes around a corner the inside of the tyrel will try to lift off and the outside of the tyre try to roll onto its outside wall. At average speeds its not very noticeable. At high speeds with a tall tyre wall (comfort tyres) it will be very noticable as the wall truss to buckle under.

    Now tilt the top of the wheel inward, so that only the inside of the tyre is in contact with the ground. As the car goes throu the corner the tyre will roll outward, but instead of losing contact the tyre will gain contact with the ground. Now push the wheel outward even harder, the tyre will now roll as it did before.

    Now tilt the wheel/tyre even more. Now the inside of the tyre is in contact on the streights (same as above). As the car turns the tyre rolls out... but instead of rolling into into contact with the ground the tyre never reaches that point. Too much Camber. Gotta balance it.

    As always if I'm talkin out my a** just let me know.
  8. E-cobra

    london
    PSN:E-cobra

    the stuff you guys are telling me is useful and all but it is stuff i already know. i tested my 787b on nurburgring 24hr course and my ford gt on grad valley speedway and got those results but i am still lost as to what camber does. I would like a general rule like increasing front camber does this and increasing rear camber does this and a combination of the two does this etc
  9. oopssorryy

    Ohio
    PSN:oops_sorryy

    Increasing front Camber will improve your corner entry, mid corner control, and corner exit. If you add enough you can kill understeer, or even create oversteer. Rear Camber can help control a car who's rear end is sliding out during the corner by giving the rear tires more grip during the corner. If you have a car with four wheel steer, rear camber will also help everything that front Camber can.
  10. oppositelock

    United States NorCal
    PSN:oppositelock27

    No such rule exists. The effects of camber changes will vary depending on each possible combination of car, tire, suspension, and track. Since GT doesn't bestow upon us tire pyrometer readings, it's 100% trial and error.
  11. E-cobra

    london
    PSN:E-cobra

    does camber effect oversteer and understeer only slightly or a whole lot?
  12. oopssorryy

    Ohio
    PSN:oops_sorryy

    Depends on how much you use. It also depends on how heavy your car it, the size of your tires, wheel base, and suspension setup. A good set up will always do better with a little bit of camber than a car with a stock set up with a ton of camber.
  13. oppositelock

    United States NorCal
    PSN:oppositelock27

    Increasing front camber decreases turn-in in my experience. Also, once you push past the optimum angle, adding more will increase understeer again. The hard part is determining where that optimum angle is.
  14. oopssorryy

    Ohio
    PSN:oops_sorryy

    Really? It might just be a difference in driving styles, but I've always found positives when using camber, to a point.

    You do make a good point, everything good can become bad when over used. I never go past 2.0, anything pasted this and I feel that my entire driving experience is ruined, cornering sucks, and the car will be be no good at braking and accelerating, along with being unstable everywhere.
  15. Ronald6

    United States Portland / Or /
    PSN:Barefoot_Driver

    Up to a point. Its a bell curve. At the top of the curve is optimum grip. Any over or under will have the same effect. Adding or removing .1 will lessen the grip by the same amount.

    Finding the top of that curve is difficult. The rest of the suspension has to be correct (for that track, or more specific: corner).

    Don't forget each track might have three "correct" Camber settings. One each for: TT, comfort/endurance and drift.