Any crazy home networks w/massive data storage?

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Hey there...I've recently made the decision that I need to drastically rethink my home network and storage situation. Currently, there are 2 laptops (WiFi), 1 desktop (Ethernet) and a headless HTPC/Torrent Box/File Server (Ethernet), 1 HP Color Laser Printer (Ethernet) & 1 Sony XBR-55X850D (WiFi). There are various smartphones and tablets that connect & disconnect frequently throughout the day. My biggest concern at the moment is the quickly growing storage requirements. At the moment my server is running a total of 54 TB with a combination of 1, 3, 6 & 8 TB drives. None of this is RAID. None of it is currently backing up anything more than the user folders of me and my roommates (ALB123\Pictures, ALB123\Downloads, ALB123\Documents, etc...) two laptops and one desktop.

There is a ridiculously massive number of movies, complete tv shows, comics, volumes of magazines, tons of books and a lot of music living on that server. A) I need to start thinking about backing up - at least whatever we deem the most important stuff and B) We need to have plenty of room for continued growth. While I don't think it will continue growing as fast as it did, Movies & TV Shows will definitely increase at a decent pace.

I'm looking at building a new server with a big case for 10 3.5's which would really help in the present because I'd also like to unload the burden on my current server. It's doing too much...and I'm looking to expand the workload with a PLEX Server for friends and family to access. I suppose I could build my own NAS using FreeNAS and a big case...but I have zero experience with FreeNAS and ZFS makes me nervous especially with all of my current drives running NTFS.

I've come across 15 & 16 bay hard drive enclosures that aren't really that expensive ($400-$500), but that would mean plugging that into my current server which doesn't lighten the load on this aging Intel i5, 6GB RAM server. It's weird. I didn't think this situation I'm in would be all that uncommon nowadays. Heck, with 100Mbit internet connections and sub-$200 External 8TB HDDs available, I'm shocked there aren't my questions haven't already become commonplace.

Oh, I almost forgot. I have a Cisco (Linksys) AE3500 Wifi Router (4 port 1 Gigabit). Both desktop & server are on Gigabyte NICs, but I also want to look toward the future as far as the network components go. I've been looking at some of the Cisco Small Biz Routers. Was surprised the prices weren't that bad. I know some people who have traditional Cisco routers and they added an external device as the Wireless Access Point for WiFi connections...but I don't know if I will need to purchase an additional switch too.

As you can see, I'm pulling my hair out and I'm running in circles, not even knowing where to begin. I'd love to hear from people with very large data storage systems - hearing about how easy your 2-port NAS is really won't help. I'm open to any and all suggestions that discuss at least some of the points I've raised here in this post. Thanks for taking the time to read...There are probably a whole lot of incoherent rambling - I haven't slept in 2 days now and I'm just about to crash here at the keyboard.

Thanks again!
 

Rallywagon

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There are a few avenues to take. But I think you are getting on the right track. I reccomend the server you are looking at, fill it out with the best you can afford and run it in at least RAID 5, probably 5+1. Absolutely run it on FreeNAS. Dont be intimidated, its gotten a lot more user friendly and there are tons of great resources around the interwebs on how to set it up. After you get it set up, start migrating all your pertinent files over.
Another neat tool for mass storage, especially if you would like to provision virtual drives is CoprHD.
I work enterprise storage, so my knowledge base is a bit different than what you would be using, but my buddy is a serious data horder, the only person i know who legit has a petabyte worth of data. Ill query him as to his recommendations.
 

Rallywagon

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Ok, here is his recommendations to your post:

Super micro 16core atom with 11 10tb drives 64-128gb ddr4. Add a couple of SSD for read cache then a mirrored set SSD for write cache. Then throw a large m.2 drive in and install esxi. Then make a VM assign the lsi controller running it mode to the vm
Then spin up a windows 10 or nix and run Plex on that or do it on freenas.
Run a zfs 3 pool. Turn on snapshooting
That gives you 78tb usagable
 
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Very nice! Thanks for taking the time to enquire. A lot of that is going to be new to me -- I've just begun walking down the deep, dark tunnel of massive data collecting. I'm so mad at myself because I kind of always thought I would find myself in this situation some day. I should have started grabbing pieces here and there -- even just rack equipment, that stuff is expensive! Again...I really appreciate your posts. You've given me some more things to think about here. If you don't see me respond to this thread, its because I was arrested trying to climb through a window at the Mass Mutual Tower intent on robbing their IT department. "Just gimme those two servers and no one gets hurt! Oh, and throw in some breakaway cables too...Umm, how about a 1Gig switch?" :lol:
 

Dave A

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I have an ASUSTOR NAS with 12TB data atour home, that stores all of our movies, music, tv shows etc. I have a smaller seperate NAS for work stuff, only 2TB that one. 54TB is insane, how much of that have you used
 
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Nothing to flashy here. I have a 6TB home-built NAS running Ubuntu Server edition. It stores all of my old ripped DVDs and CDs and is the default storage location (via SAMBE shares) for My Documents etc for my Windows machines - I don't keep any data on my Windows desktop/laptop. I used to use it to store and stream my music collection but these days I really only use Spotify, so in that regard it's just a backup of my old CD collection.

The server also runs a VPN so I can securely connect to my home network whenever I need to. I also run Goodsync on the Ubuntu Server which allows me to use OneDrive as a backup location for the critical data on the NAS. Goodsync is great because it allows you to use Onedrive as a true backup location rather than just something you syncronise with. The less critical data goes onto an external USB drive from time to time that I then take to work and store in my locker.

It's also running a 24/7 Minecraft server that my son and his friends online play on.

The server is about 9 years old now and has still yet to crash even once. The only thing that ever brings it down is a power outage. Have to love Ubuntu Server!
 
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Rallywagon

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When your main horde is video such as movies and tv shows, it goes exepctionally fast.
NAS boxes are a great slow storage solution. But not so good for high demand, high traffic. If ALB and his buddies/family are going to be hitting his server a lot to watch bideos, listen to music, back up files, an OTS NAS box is going to saturated quick. Its buily with the idea of storing data, not streaming content.
For example. My mentioned friend above has a very similar setup to what i posted in my second reply. He can stream content through plex for about 30 people, and then i think his ISP becomes the bottle neck, not the hardware.
Buddy number 2 has a similar library, but its stored on NAS, 3 or more peiple watching at once over saturates the read cache and/or the RAM and we all start to experience constant clipping.
Further, a NAS is just that, storage. With a proper host server running ESXI, ALB would also be able to spin up VM's as well if he or a friend want to build a windows or linux OS or any number of other server/os options (IE freeNAS, OpenVPN PFsense, etc.).
 
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Thank you so much @Dave A! I had never heard of Asustor - just bookmarked their main product page. 👍 Right now I have two empty 8GB drives - I purged a lot of stuff that I've been meaning to clean out for a long time. So 40GB is active. And the way this storage situation literally exploded to this size in less than a year, I've got a ridiculous number of drive letters. :lol:

Sounds like you got a good, solid setup @Daz555! My current server is only running Win10, which actually works surprisingly well since all the other machines are Windows 10 too. I had a server previously that I ran Windows Server 2003 and that was a great, stable system. Overkill for what I was doing then, so I put Win 10 on the replacement, never thinking I would start to become a hoarder. (My roommate is just as bad as me, if not worse...and he couldn't burn a CD, so guess who gets to do everything all of the time?

Now, a proper Server OS would probably be a good idea. I am sick to my stomach that I never bothered getting into Linux over the years. I'm sure I could install Ubuntu Server and figure it out...when you have a GUI, it makes things 1000 times easier to figure out. But command-line stuff. Forget about it. I have a lifetime shell on a server in Poland that I use for IRC, so I ssh into my shell, run Screen & Irssi. SFTP. Yup. I'm hardcore. :banghead:

@Rallywagon, you hit on one of the most difficult choices to make right now. Streaming is going to require a different set of requirements than just plain storage. Part of me says, "Screw worrying about the streaming solution right now. Get a proper storage & backup solution in place then worry about the other stuff." With my current server I've been in hotel rooms where I fired up JRiver on my laptop, stuck an HDMI into the hotel room TV and streamed movies from my home. I've never tried to stress test it though...

You are so right about hoarding movies/tv shows. With 4K UHD movies...I weep as I watch a HDD file up in realtime due to those file sizes.

Thank you, everyone for your help -- if anyone thinks of anything else, please, keep posting. I need all the help / suggestions / advice that I can get.
 

Rallywagon

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No worries @ALB123, you come up with anymore questions, just come back here and ask. There are enough tech guru's here to help you out.
 

Dave A

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Thank you so much @Dave A! I had never heard of Asustor - just bookmarked their main product page. 👍
No problem, I highly recommend them. I've had a couple and never had any problems, they also very user friendly and easy to set up just how you want them to work.
 
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https://www.gtplanet.net/forum/threads/danoffs-dvr-build.309781/#post-11697613

I'm running 12TB, which is nothing compared to 54. But I did buy a 12-drive enclosure for it and that helps a lot. There's enough room in the case to velcro in SSDs to the side of the case too to get more than 12 drives.
Thanks for sharing your link....I went back and read the whole thread. When I got to the part "this is quickly getting out of hand..." I absolutely lost it and laughed for a good 60 seconds.

Which 12-drive enclosure do you have?
 
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I_IGrayfoxI_I
I have a Proraid 4 bay storage device with 4x4TB drives in RAID 5.
12TB of storage.

Will upgrade soon to a 4 bay NAS unit.
 

Danoff

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Thanks for sharing your link....I went back and read the whole thread. When I got to the part "this is quickly getting out of hand..." I absolutely lost it and laughed for a good 60 seconds.

Which 12-drive enclosure do you have?

It's the Rosewill 4U 12 hot-swap. I suspect... still working on this theory, that my old case before the Rosewill 4U was contributing to some premature drive death due to temperature. The 12-drive enclosure has much better cooling for the drives. Time will tell if I lose fewer drives but it does seem to be the case so far.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00N9CXGSO/?tag=gtplanet-20


Edit:

Ok, a word on data striping. FreeNAS ZFS can be configured to stripe data across multiple drives, and provide redundancy. For example, if you have 3 drives, you could stripe data across all three drives (a portion of the file is on each) with enough overlap that you could rebuild the data if you lost any one of the drives. This would cost you the space of one of the drives. So you get 2/3 of the total space and single-drive redundancy. To boot, when you read the file, you read it simultaneously from all 3 drives, cutting the read time to 1/3 of the total read time.

Sounds awesome right?

Here's the catch. If you lost one of those drives, your performance is terrible. You have to rebuild the file through some processor-intensive calculations on the remaining drives. If you replace the lost drive, the rebuild time is extensive, maybe 24 hours for a decent amount of data. Why do you care? Well, if you lose another drive you lose everything. So you're hammering those drives hard for 24 hours while trying to rebuild your raid and you're risking the entire data pool by doing so. Meanwhile, your data is essentially "down" (sloooow) the moment you lose a drive.

It gets worse... none of the individual drives are readable in a striped configuration. Yank any of those drives out of your raid pool and it's garbage to any other machine. That's kinda nice when you lose a drive, you don't have to worry about your data getting into the wrong hands, but if you lose your media server OS, you're gonna have problems reading any of your drives from any other machine. Think of it as though your striped drives are encrypted.

With mirroring instead of striping, in order to get the same space you'd need an extra drive. 2/4 of the drive space with 2 redundant. The read speed is slightly slower, but a read request only spools one of the 4 drives in the system instead of spooling and reading from all drives in the system. If one drive goes down, no performance is lost. Write speed is faster because you don't have to calculate how to break up the file across multiple drives. It's just a straight copy. Replacement is fast, and the remaining drives are all stand-alone coherent. Losing 2 drives in this configuration could result in lost data (1/3 chance that the second drive is the one that was backing up the first drive), but you won't lose everything.

This is why I switched to mirroring.
 
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Thank you for the information @Danoff -- I'm probably knowledgeable enough about standalone PCs, but I am terribly inept with networking and large storage systems as anyone could tell from reading my posts...so if you ever think of something that is good to know for a n00b, please feel free to post. This previous post of yours about striping vs mirroring was great. I kind of knew that both options existed, but I haven't been thinking about redundancy and I probably should be, before I find myself in an even deeper hole.

It's funny that you posted the link to that Rosewill 4U 12-Bay storage/server case. I was just looking at it on Amazon a few days ago. That price is very attractive! Do you run that case as a complete system/server with motherboard, CPU & RAM or is it just for housing up to 12 3.5" HDDs that are connected to a separate server?

I really wish I had started this 2-3 years back when my health & finances were in much better shape...but, if I have to go slow in the beginning, so be it. It's so scary - the size of an individual HDD nowadays can store so...much...stuff. I'm playing with 8's, but 12 & 10TB are becoming more and more common. Imagine losing 12TB of anything...A quick glance at a 6TB drive on the server reveals about 550 movies. I'm sweating just thinking about it.

Do you have most of your gear rack-mounted? I'm so pissed...I was offered a 12U rack for free about 5 years ago and I turned it down because I was too lazy to drive 2.5 hours and pick it up. It was completely fine...my friend was working an IT job and they were replacing a lot of equipment. There is no way that I could justify the costs of buying new, so I keep checking Craigslist & EBay hoping to find a killer deal.
 

Danoff

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Thank you for the information @Danoff -- I'm probably knowledgeable enough about standalone PCs, but I am terribly inept with networking and large storage systems as anyone could tell from reading my posts...so if you ever think of something that is good to know for a n00b, please feel free to post. This previous post of yours about striping vs mirroring was great. I kind of knew that both options existed, but I haven't been thinking about redundancy and I probably should be, before I find myself in an even deeper hole.

It's funny that you posted the link to that Rosewill 4U 12-Bay storage/server case. I was just looking at it on Amazon a few days ago. That price is very attractive! Do you run that case as a complete system/server with motherboard, CPU & RAM or is it just for housing up to 12 3.5" HDDs that are connected to a separate server?

I really wish I had started this 2-3 years back when my health & finances were in much better shape...but, if I have to go slow in the beginning, so be it. It's so scary - the size of an individual HDD nowadays can store so...much...stuff. I'm playing with 8's, but 12 & 10TB are becoming more and more common. Imagine losing 12TB of anything...A quick glance at a 6TB drive on the server reveals about 550 movies. I'm sweating just thinking about it.

Do you have most of your gear rack-mounted? I'm so pissed...I was offered a 12U rack for free about 5 years ago and I turned it down because I was too lazy to drive 2.5 hours and pick it up. It was completely fine...my friend was working an IT job and they were replacing a lot of equipment. There is no way that I could justify the costs of buying new, so I keep checking Craigslist & EBay hoping to find a killer deal.

I do not have my case rack-mounted. I just leave it on a desk in my basement. The case is housing the server as well as the drives. I don't have it full yet. I will say that it's not common for motherboards to support 12 HDDs, so you'll probably need an expansion card for however far up you're looking to scale. I mentioned it in the other thread but just in case you missed it, I like having different pools on my raid server. A pool (on some hard drives) for some data, a different pool for other data on other hard drives. It segments out the usage. You could velcro in a 500gb SSD inside the case, taking up no space, and mirror it with another and have a super fast read section for documents (or whatever) while having a different larger slower pool for movies. Lots of options. Another great reason to segment pools is to restrict access to certain data. Maybe you want more people to have access to movies than you do your tax filings for example. FreeNAS plays best with drives that are the same size within the same pool. So if you have some 1TB drives lying around that won't play nice with 8TB drives in your larger pools, you can use them to create a smaller one.
 
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I do not have my case rack-mounted. I just leave it on a desk in my basement. The case is housing the server as well as the drives. I don't have it full yet. I will say that it's not common for motherboards to support 12 HDDs, so you'll probably need an expansion card for however far up you're looking to scale. I mentioned it in the other thread but just in case you missed it, I like having different pools on my raid server. A pool (on some hard drives) for some data, a different pool for other data on other hard drives. It segments out the usage. You could velcro in a 500gb SSD inside the case, taking up no space, and mirror it with another and have a super fast read section for documents (or whatever) while having a different larger slower pool for movies. Lots of options. Another great reason to segment pools is to restrict access to certain data. Maybe you want more people to have access to movies than you do your tax filings for example. FreeNAS plays best with drives that are the same size within the same pool. So if you have some 1TB drives lying around that won't play nice with 8TB drives in your larger pools, you can use them to create a smaller one.
Very cool. I'm going to have to figure out my RAID situation before I pull the trigger on new hardware, I suppose. I should plan out what I want to do with the backbone of my network. I'm still going to keep my current server (Pinky) running. She's a Dell Desktop Ivy Bridge i5 CPU, 6GB RAM, Gigabyte NIC. Right now she's handling everything okay right now, but I don't want things to be just "okay". I haven't decided if I'll keep Windows 10 on her and use her primarily as the Torrent handler. That would mean a new server is required for the HTPC, File Server & Storage control.

While I'm currently leaning toward that Rosewill 4U 12-bay server chassis, I sometimes think about going crazy and getting one of those refurbished Dell PowerEdge servers via Amazon.com...A nice powerhouse...something like CLICK ME so I could start messing with virtualization and all sorts of madness. Unfortunately, those PE Servers don't have HDMI out so I'd have to keep the HTPC on my current server Pinky and move the torrent duties and file server stuff onto the Dell PE. But then, I figure I could probably build exactly what I want with that Rosewill 4U case AND have HDMI out. Do you run single core or dual CPU?
 

Danoff

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Very cool. I'm going to have to figure out my RAID situation before I pull the trigger on new hardware, I suppose. I should plan out what I want to do with the backbone of my network. I'm still going to keep my current server (Pinky) running. She's a Dell Desktop Ivy Bridge i5 CPU, 6GB RAM, Gigabyte NIC. Right now she's handling everything okay right now, but I don't want things to be just "okay". I haven't decided if I'll keep Windows 10 on her and use her primarily as the Torrent handler. That would mean a new server is required for the HTPC, File Server & Storage control.

While I'm currently leaning toward that Rosewill 4U 12-bay server chassis, I sometimes think about going crazy and getting one of those refurbished Dell PowerEdge servers via Amazon.com...A nice powerhouse...something like CLICK ME so I could start messing with virtualization and all sorts of madness. Unfortunately, those PE Servers don't have HDMI out so I'd have to keep the HTPC on my current server Pinky and move the torrent duties and file server stuff onto the Dell PE. But then, I figure I could probably build exactly what I want with that Rosewill 4U case AND have HDMI out. Do you run single core or dual CPU?

My network storage server is an i3-4170 (dual core). I ran a single core, and it worked reasonably well, but if you were farming out to 2 plex clients simultaneously that would bring a single-core CPU system to its knees. FreeNAS has a plex plugin that (these days) works pretty consistently, but you do need a decent CPU (I consider mine decent, I know a lot of people wouldn't) to do the on-the-fly encoding needed to feed a plex client. One of my TVs has the roku OS, for example, so it's plugged in to nothing but the wall. It uses wifi to get plex from my media server directly to the in-TV plex app. Other apps provide other uses. There's even a DLNA connection to my PVR for that TV so I can watch programming that I've recorded over the air but haven't moved to the server yet. I don't know if FreeNAS has plug-in torrent handling (edit: I looked it up, it does). It wouldn't surprise me too much, but your dell seems like overkill for the job of just downloading and uploading stuff. You could probably take the dell hardware and put it in the rosewill case and make a good media server if you wanted.

The PVR is nice btw, identifies and removes commercials automatically.

Also btw, when you set up freenas, make sure you configure it to send you emails (I figured out how to do this somehow, and I totally can't remember how I did that. I do not run a local mail server). That way it can send you an email when it detects that a HDD went down.

I think if I were you I'd move torrent and plex to freenas. Build a decent raid system with a large enclosure, and make that your central data hub. Keep the HTPC. I personally like having an over the air PVR system as well.
 
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My network storage server is an i3-4170 (dual core). I ran a single core, and it worked reasonably well, but if you were farming out to 2 plex clients simultaneously that would bring a single-core CPU system to its knees. FreeNAS has a plex plugin that (these days) works pretty consistently, but you do need a decent CPU (I consider mine decent, I know a lot of people wouldn't) to do the on-the-fly encoding needed to feed a plex client. One of my TVs has the roku OS, for example, so it's plugged in to nothing but the wall. It uses wifi to get plex from my media server directly to the in-TV plex app. Other apps provide other uses. There's even a DLNA connection to my PVR for that TV so I can watch programming that I've recorded over the air but haven't moved to the server yet. I don't know if FreeNAS has plug-in torrent handling (edit: I looked it up, it does). It wouldn't surprise me too much, but your dell seems like overkill for the job of just downloading and uploading stuff. You could probably take the dell hardware and put it in the rosewill case and make a good media server if you wanted.

The PVR is nice btw, identifies and removes commercials automatically.

Also btw, when you set up freenas, make sure you configure it to send you emails (I figured out how to do this somehow, and I totally can't remember how I did that. I do not run a local mail server). That way it can send you an email when it detects that a HDD went down.

I think if I were you I'd move torrent and plex to freenas. Build a decent raid system with a large enclosure, and make that your central data hub. Keep the HTPC. I personally like having an over the air PVR system as well.
I was looking at some i3 processors this past weekend. What motherboard are you running with it? I'm currently using JRiver for HTPC software and while Music piece is supposed to be one of the best parts about JRiver, I use MediaMonkey for my audio collection. I probably should just switch it over to JRiver...Maybe I will, just to limit the number of cooks in the kitchen.

I know JRiver is equipped to deal with TV, but to be honest, I have zero knowledge of using a tuner card and PVR. I couldn't see any benefit to recording local TV channels that are OTA HD signals.
 

Danoff

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@ALB123

I think it's an Asus Z87. There are a few flavors of that board, I went for lots of SATA ports. I'm using Kodi for HTPC software but it boots to Win7.

The main thing I record local TV channels for are sporting events, so locally broadcasted NFL games and things like the Olympics. OTA HD signals are much better than the compressed stuff from satellite and cable.
 
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I thought I would revisit this thread. I ran into a bit of luck and took over a custom built PC from a friend of mine at no cost. Specs are decent: i5, 24GB RAM, 1000/100/10 NIC. Case big enough for 8 3.5" drives. I shucked seven WD External 8TB HDDs and all survived. I had to do a ton of file moving as those drives had to go in clean once torn from the WD enclosure. It's currently running as another file server, but I think I'm going to with FreeNAS at some point. The problem with continuing to grow is how to backup all this nonsense. Still considering building a big RAID array.

I purchased an older full-size server rack (42U) for $25 off an IT Manager via Craigslist. Next purchase is probably going to be a refurbished Dell Poweredge R610 or R710. They're surprisingly affordable and with dual Xeon processors and gobs of RAM (probably 96GB minimum) along with Windows Server 2016 that will allow me to venture into Virtualization - then I could allow one of those servers to act solely as a HTPC.

My router committed suicide a couple of weeks ago. I've been thinking of getting away from consumer level networking gear, so I made my move and purchased:

Ubiquiti UniFi Security Gateway Pro 4
UniFi 16-Port Switch w/POE (150w)
UniFi AC-Lite Access Point
Unifi Cloud Key (So I could keep the Controller software off my server)

I can't believe how fast my network is running with good hardware. It costs a bit more than your typical consumer grade Linksys or Netgear equipment, but it's been fantastic and well worth every penny thus far. The amount of control I have over my network is amazing - comparing it to my previous Linksys router.
 

Danoff

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Next purchase is probably going to be a refurbished Dell Poweredge R610 or R710. They're surprisingly affordable and with dual Xeon processors and gobs of RAM (probably 96GB minimum) along with Windows Server 2016 that will allow me to venture into Virtualization - then I could allow one of those servers to act solely as a HTPC.

What's the usage scenario here? You have a virtual HTPC with an HDMI cable running from (somewhere) to the TV? What does that buy you? It keeps you from having to have a stand alone PC at your TV (or on the other end of an HDMI cable). Maybe it saves you some power, a little floor space. What does it cost you? A ton of complexity, probably reliability, probably quite a bit of cash.

I think you're still better off with a raid server with the content and a small sleek HTPC running nothing but SSD (for example) and regular windows. It'll be easier to build, cheaper, and easier to maintain, troubleshoot, provision with software, etc.
 
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What's the usage scenario here? You have a virtual HTPC with an HDMI cable running from (somewhere) to the TV? What does that buy you? It keeps you from having to have a stand alone PC at your TV (or on the other end of an HDMI cable). Maybe it saves you some power, a little floor space. What does it cost you? A ton of complexity, probably reliability, probably quite a bit of cash.

I think you're still better off with a raid server with the content and a small sleek HTPC running nothing but SSD (for example) and regular windows. It'll be easier to build, cheaper, and easier to maintain, troubleshoot, provision with software, etc.
Oh gosh....The HTPC is going to be a real PC - the server I have now will be able to take on that role solely. I see how you interpreted it as you did. I wrote that very poorly. "One of those servers" wasn't supposed to mean a virtual server. That's my bad.

EDIT: Oh, and the RAID box is a definite addition.