Car of the Week 228: COTY GTS Finale

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I’ll be looking forward to GT7 but for the first weeks maybe pick some cheaper cars. Are the times gonna be kept the same?
I already have Week 1's car planned since... (checks DMs) early March of last year. It's a freebie in the game, but it might take some skill to get it. I'll let whoever is selected to choose Week 2's car know to pick a cheap car as well if you're joining us.

As for the meet times... you're making me pop the surprise cherry early :P I plan on keeping Wednesdays' meets at the exact same time since all our regulars already have that time slot set aside in our busy lives.

But, I'm also considering hosting a second lobby on the weekends that's more catered to Europeans, Asians, and Oceana players, seeing as Brits like Vic are having to get up at 4 in the morning of a weekday to host, and regulars like Alex understandably can't join us for racing. I'm a Singaporean who works odd hours, so I'm joining at 12 noon on Wednesdays. It isn't a very inclusive time slot, but it was established long before I joined, and I'd like to keep that as–is for our regulars.

I'm currently thinking of having a second meet on Saturday, 5 P.M. Singapore time (8 P.M. Melbourne time, convert to other time zones here). This session will be the exact same as the existing one on Wednesdays—We will still run the cars with BoP enabled on their default tyres, for about 5 or 6 races totaling about 1.5 to 2 hours (which means bone stock settings for road cars). Only difference is that I'll be hosting the lobby.

The exact time for this new Saturday slot hasn't been decided on yet, so if anyone has any suggestions or objections, please do let me know.
 
I already have Week 1's car planned since... (checks DMs) early March of last year. It's a freebie in the game, but it might take some skill to get it. I'll let whoever is selected to choose Week 2's car know to pick a cheap car as well if you're joining us.

As for the meet times... you're making me pop the surprise cherry early :P I plan on keeping Wednesdays' meets at the exact same time since all our regulars already have that time slot set aside in our busy lives.

But, I'm also considering hosting a second lobby on the weekends that's more catered to Europeans, Asians, and Oceana players, seeing as Brits like Vic are having to get up at 4 in the morning of a weekday to host, and regulars like Alex understandably can't join us for racing. I'm a Singaporean who works odd hours, so I'm joining at 12 noon on Wednesdays. It isn't a very inclusive time slot, but it was established long before I joined, and I'd like to keep that as–is for our regulars.

I'm currently thinking of having a second meet on Saturday, 5 P.M. Singapore time (8 P.M. Melbourne time, convert to other time zones here). This session will be the exact same as the existing one on Wednesdays—We will still run the cars with BoP enabled on their default tyres, for about 5 or 6 races totaling about 1.5 to 2 hours (which means bone stock settings for road cars). Only difference is that I'll be hosting the lobby.

The exact time for this new Saturday slot hasn't been decided on yet, so if anyone has any suggestions or objections, please do let me know.

I would love to join on saturdays from time to time. :)
 
A current list of all not yet used cars for COTW:

ALFA ROMEO (1)
Giulia TZ2 Carrozzata da Zagato CN.AR750106 1965 (Gr.X)

Alpine (3)
Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vision Gran Turismo Race Mode (Gr.X)

ASTON MARTIN (3)
DB3S CN.1 1953 (Gr.X)
DP-100 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vantage Gr.4 (Gr.4)

AUDI (5)
R8 LMS Audi Team Sport WRT 2015 (Gr.3)
R18 e-tron 2016 (Gr.1)
Sport quattro S1 Pikes Peak 1987 (Gr.B)
TTS Coupe 2014 (N300)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)

BMW (4)
M4 Coupe 2014 (N400)
M4 Safety Car (Gr.X)
M6 GT3 Walkenhorst Motorsport 2016 (Gr.3)
M6 GT3 M Power Livery 2016 (Gr.3)

BUGATTI (1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

CHEVROLET (1)
Corvette Stingray Race Concept (C2) 1959 (Gr.X)

DODGE (5)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Racing (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Street (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Technology (Gr.X)
Viper Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Viper SRT GT3-R 2015 (Gr.3)

FERRARI (4)
250 GT Berlinetta passo corto CN.2521 1961 (N300)
250 GTO CN.3729GT 1962 (Gr.X)
458 Italia 2009 (N600)
Dino 246GT 1971 (N200)

FORD (2)
GT LM Spec II Test Car (Gr.3)
Mustang Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)

GRAN TURISMO (2)
Red Bull X2014 Standard 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2014 Junior 2014 (Gr.X)

HONDA (3)
NSX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
NSX Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Sports Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

HYUNDAI (4)
Genesis Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Genesis Gr.4 (Gr.4)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

JAGUAR (5)
D-Type 1954 (Gr.X)
F-Type Gr.4 (Gr.4)
XJ13 1966 (Gr.X)
XJR-9 1988 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo Coupe (Gr.X)

LAMBORGHINI (2)
Aventador LP700-4 2011 (N700)
Miura P400 Bertone Prototype CN.0706 1967 (N400)

LEXUS (1)
LF-LC GT Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MAZDA (2)
Atenza Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
LM55 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MCLAREN (3)
650S GT3 2015 (Gr.3)
MP4-12c 2010 (N600)
Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MERCEDES-BENZ (5)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ (Gr.X)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ Color Variation (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo LH Edition (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo Racing Series (Gr.X)

MINI (1)
Clubman Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MITSUBISHI (4)
Lancer Evolution IV GSR 1996 (N300)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Road Car (N500)

NISSAN (6)
Concept 2020 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GT-R Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
GT-R Motul Autech 2016 (Gr.2)
GT-R Premium Edition 2017 (N600)
GT-R Safety Car (Gr.X)
GT-R Xanavi Nismo (Gr.2)

PEUGEOT (4)
208 GTI by Peugeot Sport 2014 (N200)
RCZ Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
L750R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

PORSCHE (1)
911 GT3 (997) 2008 (N400)

RENAULT SPORT (1)
R.S.01 GT3 2016 (Gr.3)

SHELBY (1)
Cobra Daytona Coupe 1964 (Gr.X)

SUBARU (4)
BRZ Falken Tire/Turn 14 Distribution 2017 (Gr.X)
WRX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
WRX Gr.B (Gr.B)
WRX STI Type S 2014 (N300)

TOYOTA (9)
86 Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
86 GRMN 2016 (N200)
86 GT Limited 2016 (N200)
FT-1 (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
GR Supra Racing Concept (Gr.3)
GR Supra RZ 2020 (N400)
TS030 Hybrid 2012 (Gr.1)

VOLKSWAGEN (4)
Scirocco Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Golf VII GTI 2014 (N200)
GTI Roadster Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GTI Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
 
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In the past, you have had a lot of great rivalries in sports car racing and rallying such as Ford v. Ferrari, Subaru v. Mitsubishi, Porsche v. Toyota but what if two companies came together and create almost identical car called The Twins. The only difference between The Twins are motor and trim. This week we are taking a look at the Toyota 86 GT '15 and Subaru BRZ '15. This weeks cars are chosen by @Alex p.

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With the Toyota I did an 08.28.855. With the Subaru I did an 08.26.817 (MUCH more practise at track, different physics update). They are essentially equally quick. Both really nicely handling cars, but definately lacking in speed. Videos of the laps following later this week.




 
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For the final week of your regular GTS COTW before we do a farewell tour next week, we will go out on a bang with a drift car. Anyone that grew up in the mid to late 2000s would know that drifting became very popular and one of the well known names in the professional drifting scene is Daijiro Yoshihara. His Subaru Falken Tire/Turn 14 Distribution BRZ makes the appearance in GTS. Let's get sideways this week with the BRZ. This weeks car is chosen by @Obelisk

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Ah yes, rocking out with the tail out, the natural habitat for a drift car. :P

It’s practically COTW lore at this point, of my tendencies to slide the car about when applicable, it’s something i’ve done since the days of GT6. :)

While competition has greatly stepped up to the point I don’t do it as much, sometimes a car comes along that not only reawakens that part of my driving style, but actively encourages me to do so and provides all the tools I need to do it.

All that’s missing is a note taped to the steering wheel saying, “Just do what comes naturally to you.” :D

The Falken T14 sponsored Subaru BRZ is packing a 7.8 litre turbo V8 and is kicking out over a 1000hp, more than enough to smoke a set of rear tyres in a hurry. :drool:

Power is sent to the rear via a 4 speed competition manual gearbox, with gearing topping out at 140+mph, which you’ll get to pretty rapidly.

Now when you think of drift cars, you’d assume it’s a combo of decent power and low grip tyres, but the reality is different for high end FD machines, they need the massive power to overcome the FD cars setup for grip, because overpowering a grip setup allows them to drift at higher speeds which is crucial in the eyes of the Formula Drift judges.

Some FD’s use 2JZ’s, some use turbo 4 bangers with nitrous assist, a few use Rotary’s, most use V8’s of different sizes and aspirations, Heck V10’s and V12’s have seen duty at FD events. :eek:

As was mentioned at the weekly meet, most of the regulars weren’t exactly… excelling at the drift events over on GT7 so they did struggle a little when trying to stay on top of the BRZ’s 1000+hp’s.

And as most noticed, I was thriving in the world of opposite lock, tyre smoke and chaining together drifts. :sly:

Slight salt rubbing aside, you can with the right setup, turn it into a decent grip build, but don’t expect it to play nice even then.

I’ve usually mentioned in past reviews that your mileage may vary when it comes to tricky to drive cars like this, but this is the de facto example of your mileage varying in comparison to mine. :lol:

I’m very likely in the minority on this one, but this is a Sleeper. 😉👍
 
So, this would be where you might be expecting a 1971 Mustang Mach 1 review, but I've a small confession to make: I was a slight bit distracted the past two weeks, and not just because I was bedridden by a nasty flu virus, either.


Dale Earnhardt 1978 Nascar W.C.S by Hurricane-O63 livery link (GTS | GT7)​

You see, we here at Car of the Week are finally moving on from Gran Turismo Sport to Gran Turismo 7 at the end of this month, and quite frankly, I'm lamenting the switch. The open lobbies that we host races with may finally be of acceptable quality in GT7, but it's still a downgrade from those of GTS'. Not to mention, as many threads may have already told you, the force feedback of GT7 is still sorely lacking, even in comparison to the dull and simplistic model in GTS. Many elite and even casual players don't seem to have issue with it, but I guess I'm in that unfortunate pocket wherein I'm good enough to notice, but not good enough to compensate for/ bypass and ignore it entirely. Whatever the case may be, the might as well be nonexistent FFB is something I'm personally struggling immensely to get to grips with, even with daily practice. After all, how do you practice for having less information? Slides in particular are impossible to feel coming, much less correct from, because I don't know if the front tyres have hooked up or not. As such, I don't even know if I'll be good enough a driver in GT7 to feel comfortable giving out opinions about cars, and I'm feeling extremely insecure about it. And I'm supposed to be the ringmaster of the whole circus? Oof.


While not as egregious as the almost complete lack of FFB, the braking in GT7 feels odd to me as well. Stock cars with their OE brakes won't even lock their wheels on a dry, level road anymore, even if you slammed the brake pedal to the floor. To be fair, it's not as if the cars in GT7 stopped any better; they just seemingly have more longitudinal grip and weaker brakes. It makes the friction circle feel more like a friction oval, and it's so unintuitive to figure out where the limits of grip are if I slam the brakes and don't bring the front tyres to their limits, meaning I don't get a feel for where their limits are on braking zones into corners. Plus, it means that cars that have "personality stock" in how raw they are without aids like ABS, such as Vipers and AE86s, lose a lot of the challenge that defines their character, and that's just a bummer.


All told, I much prefer the driving feel of GTS. It's not perfect, but it's intuitive. Maybe the issues I've listed above will be adjusted in future patches of GT7, but I highly doubt they'll be addressed as they feel like intentional choices. It's been a few months since I've read of any physics or FFB adjustments in this year old game. Makes me think PD are happy with where the game is.

So, what in god's name does any of my old man waving a cane at the clouds have anything to do with the 1971 Mustang Mach 1 back here in GTS? Well, it's the third to last car (or fourth?) we're driving here in GTS COTW, and I'm very, very glad that I got to experience it before we leave GTS, because I don't think it'd be half as good to drive in GT7.


It's a classic muscle car, and so large, defining parts of its recipe have already been set in stone: It's cheap, packs a HUGE NA V8 up front with pathetic specific output figures, rear drive, a 4 speed gearbox that tops out at the quarter mile, and an equal thirst for fuel and blood. To expect anything even semi–decent from a recipe like this would be almost like expecting discount store rice balls to act as antidepressants, but lo and behold, Don Don Donki's rice balls give me some much needed justification for life's ceaseless suffering, and I might have fallen equally in love with the Mustang Mach 1 two weeks ago.


I'm not sure how common this feeling is among better adjusted people, but do you ever get the feeling of instant confidence when you take your first corner in a very good car at sane, pedestrian speeds, so much so that the car almost seems to be mocking you, chiding you for having the audacity to doubt it, all while making you feel like you're immediately missing out by not dancing with it at the bleeding edges of its traction? Over the course of the three years I've played pretend reviewer, I've felt this sensation maybe four times: in the 981 GT4 CS, E46 M3, the AE86 twins, and the R53 Cooper S. Then, out of nowhere, this 1,615kg (3,560lbs) clunker of a pony car suddenly ups and joins that list of elite cars just from me steering out of Big Willow's pit lane during race day, and thankfully, this promise of greatness is not one that can be faked; the car made good on that promise throughout the rest of race day.


It's a rather soft and heavy road car, and an antiquated one at that, so of course it moves about when subject to even mild gs. But, while I was expecting a Leaning Tower of Pisa stapled onto a floating island in the middle of a Tsunami levels of instability, what I got instead was a very well mannered and obedient race horse, one that is old fashioned, but measured in its movements and refined in its demeanour. It never once felt sloppy, or lashed out in a way I did not expect; everything it did, was because I told it to, from the brakes locking up to the car spinning out.


Braking for a corner in a '71 Mustang is, dare I say it, akin to braking for a corner in a modern Formula 1 car, wherein you have to initially fully stomp on the brake pedal at speed, and as the downforce bleeds off the car, you slowly ease off the brake pedal to account for that loss of grip on the tyres, lest you lock up the wheels. I'm not saying that a '71 Mustang has that kind of speed or any kind of downforce, but it does have disc brakes at all four corners, shocking for a muscle car from the '70s, and the braking technique in the pony car is not at all dissimilar to what I just described: full brake, and as the discs quickly find their bite on the bias ply shod steelies, ease off the pressure to prevent a lockup. The tyres are wonderfully communicative under braking, and I often find myself drawing very consistent skid marks with the inside tyre of a very slightly off neutral braking zone lap after lap, just to assure me that I'm right there at the bleeding edge of traction where the Mustang wants me


And hey, it's a classic muscle car, and so part of its charm is in the fear it instills in the driver, isn't it? Just because it's communicative and cooperative doesn't mean it's not scary; you still need to have your wits about you to survive a drive in the thing, but that's exactly what makes a drivers' car a drivers' car, isn't it? It's scary not in a "chased by a serial killer" kind of way, wherein there's no control over the situation, but rather, it's a "horror video game" kind of scary, wherein you intentionally scare yourself just for a controlled high; I'd even go as far as to argue that one hasn't truly lived if they hadn't experienced the self inflicted horror of going over the horrendously inconsistent braking zone into Laguna Seca's Corkscrew without ABS, going over blind crests and disruptive rumble strips, all while having to make minute steering adjustments while under hard braking. And if one hasn't truly lived without that experience, then I daresay that there's no other car I want to experience it with than the Mustang Mach 1, because it has just the right amount of speed to scare you, but at the same time, it also has impeccable communication and poise to never make the task feel unfair or unapproachable.


While you have to modulate the brake pedal just to prevent a lockup under braking, you'll have to be much, much more gentle with it when turning the car into a corner, because over stressing the front tyres doesn't cause them to simply give up in a puff of smoke; on the contrary, they will overwork themselves into flinging the nose of the car into the corner with enough furor to instantly swing out the similarly stressed rear tyres, and if you happen to be in the peaky powerband of the Cleveland 351 V8 engine when that happens, then you've got yourself a surprisingly potent drift car, all without the crutch of the handbrake! In a slide, the job of communicating to its driver transfers from the tyres to the steering wheel, with the steering wheel notably lightening up when grip is lost, the 7.0L NA V8 is more than willing and able in its powerband, and the car never being truly beyond the driver's control or intuition. While I've never found drifting intuitive in Gran Turismo games no matter the control scheme, the Mustang Mach 1 in GT Sport is a car that I seemingly subconsciously break sideways just so I can have the joy of proving to myself that I can not only hold a slide, but recover it as and when I want. It's just a car that makes me want to play endlessly against my better judgement!


As a whole then, the Mustang can be a scary car to drive quickly, but that's just due desserts for what I'd like to think is willfully playful driving. If you respect it and pay deep attention to how you handle it, the Mustang will very much reciprocate by being one of the most well behaved, communicative, and capable sports car—not just of its era, not just of its class, but of all the carefully curated list of enthusiast picks present in this game, including the likes of RX-7s, Integras, 911s, and Corvettes. It's a car that can be well–behaved when you want it to, and let down its mane when you ask it to at the drop of a riding helmet, and it's an extremely darling communicator no matter what you put it through. In other words, it ticks all the boxes of a great sports car.


Does it have its flaws? Oh, for sure. Its four speed gearbox tops out at a mere 182km/h (113mph) on a level road in clean air. Because of its low top speed, I often find myself trying to grab a fifth gear that isn't there, and when I got too used to camping at its limiter, I bounce off the 6,000rpm redline in third because I'm dumb. Its complete lack of top end does make even one–make races frustrating, as you can often smell the blood in the air from a competitor who messed up a corner ahead of you, but you'll only gain on them for a second or two before the both of you are topped out at the magical 182km/h, as though the Mustang was a 90s Japanese car, and if you're leading, you don't really get to extend the gap much with your sick skillz. Needless to say, against anything else with more top end and even comparable power, the Mustang is a dead horse in the water. It also has the thirstiest 302HP (225kW) I have ever seen in my life! It's not surprising, given that the peak power of its humongous 7.0L V8 lies just 500rpm away from redline, and the seemingly sawn–off gearbox of the car keeps the engine obsessively badgering its limiter. But hey, that just means that the car gets lighter that much faster over the course of a race, no? I call that a tactical disadvantage.


I'm aware that, in real life, the 1971 Mustang Mach 1 probably isn't anywhere near as sublime to drive as it is in the game. Its suspension is probably a lot more soggy, its steering rack might resemble a wet noodle more than a steering rack, its brakes most likely only work part time, and the car will most likely explode when the steering wheel is tilted more than 0.5 degrees to the right. Hell, I'm willing to bet it doesn't even have 200HP at the crank, given how Americans are so obsessed with gross horsepower at the time. But you know what? I went into this week with lower than zero expectations, and I walked away not only pleasantly surprised, but retroactively wanting more. Not that I could've known it two weeks ago, but the 1971 Mustang Mach 1 is all the sendoff I need for Gran Turismo Sport: it let me lock its brakes, it let me slide it around, and it'd even have let me have close knit battles with my friends if I found the balls to trust it during race day. None of that is currently possible with GT7, and I'm glad that I had to have this very, very special experience with the Mustang before we moved on from this game.


I mean, it's not like we're literally going to test another 7L V8 4 speed gearbox drift car in the next two weeks, are we? That's just ridiculous, don't make me laugh!
 
This is the final week of GTS COTW. It's been a great couple of years of friendly rivalries, cars, passes and liveries. We all have drove the worst of the worst and best of the best in COTW. It is time to move on and leave the past behind. This is my final post for COTW GTS as I will be stepping down from creating COTW and passing the torch to @XSquareStickIt. He will be in charge for COTW GT7.

Thank you all for this group. Hope to see you all tonight as we go racing with all of COTY cars.
 
I know I left high school and got busy with work and life and all that (being on the wrong side of the world didn't help), but COTW on GTS was just as fun and engaging as on 6, as on 5... cheers for the races and the good times!! Joining you guys the other week was awesome, and maybe if I'm around I'll be able to join you guys for the finale. We'll see!
 
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I, uh... might have gone a little overboard with the photo shoot, eheh.

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Thanks to everyone that has been here through our 228–week journey, no matter how long you've been here! It feels stupidly clichéd to say, but there's no other way to put it: Car of the Week wouldn't be possible without everyone chipping in, be it via writing, racing, banter, debate, or just showing up week in and week out. Special thanks goes of course to Racer, for starting us off here on GT Sport. Real life had been catching up to him for years now, and I'm glad he stuck around for three more years to see us into GT7! And of course, special thanks also go to our resident Stig, Vic, for being the tireless trooper that he is, hosting almost all of our lobbies at 4 A.M. on his side!

If you'll indulge me in some personal cheesy storytime for a bit, joining Car of the Week was a pretty big and uncharacteristic move for me, as I'm usually very anti–social and withdrawn. I was going through a particularly rough time in my life, and it being 2020 certainly didn't help matters. One of the things my therapist left me with was that I should continually challenge myself to a reasonable extent, to go out of my comfort zone a bit and find a group to share a hobby or interest with. A sort of "safe space", I think she meant, where I can learn to express myself more.

Happily, the RE Amemiya FD3S RX-7 was chosen as the Car of the Week near the start of 2020, and, seeing as I already had a "review" for it written on my photo album, decided to copy–paste it here. I was met with very warm reception, which prompted me to give this club a chance and keep on keeping on and see what happens. I had a lot of insecurities and bad life experiences up to that point, and I had a lot of voices in my head telling me that I wasn't welcome, that I write too much, that I was drowning out everyone else who had smarter things to say written in a better manner. It's not entirely unfounded, because I still want to claw out my skull when I go back to read those early rambles I passed off as "reviews" back then. I think many people don't get past those insecurities and stop at that point. Hell, I could've sworn I was one such person.

But, no one said a bad thing to me aside from myself. And that was the only thing that allowed me to keep writing, and in doing so, slowly finding my own style of writing, finding out what works and what doesn't, which involved a lot of... experimentation. Right now, I still don't think I write the Shakespeare of car reviews, and I do miss a lot of the other talented writers that used to write regularly here, but I at least have come to a point where I'm not ashamed to show some of my more recent writing to friends and family.

I owe this gigantic 3 year journey to the kind and accepting folk here at COTW, and I can only hope to pass on this kindness and maintain the safe space when we transition to GT7. As I said, I'm a shy, quiet, withdrawn, and anti–social person at heart, and so I genuinely have no idea what the hell I'm doing organising a club of crazies, but if you guys think I'm the best guy you've got, then I'll do my best come April.

Again, I can't thank everyone here enough for your continued participation, banter, close and clean racing, and antics. Thank you thank you thank you!

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I, uh... might have gone a little overboard with the photo shoot, eheh.


Thanks to everyone that has been here through our 228–week journey, no matter how long you've been here! It feels stupidly clichéd to say, but there's no other way to put it: Car of the Week wouldn't be possible without everyone chipping in, be it via writing, racing, banter, debate, or just showing up week in and week out. Special thanks goes of course to Racer, for starting us off here on GT Sport. Real life had been catching up to him for years now, and I'm glad he stuck around for three more years to see us into GT7! And of course, special thanks also go to our resident Stig, Vic, for being the tireless trooper that he is, hosting almost all of our lobbies at 4 A.M. on his side!

If you'll indulge me in some personal cheesy storytime for a bit, joining Car of the Week was a pretty big and uncharacteristic move for me, as I'm usually very anti–social and withdrawn. I was going through a particularly rough time in my life, and it being 2020 certainly didn't help matters. One of the things my therapist left me with was that I should continually challenge myself to a reasonable extent, to go out of my comfort zone a bit and find a group to share a hobby or interest with. A sort of "safe space", I think she meant, where I can learn to express myself more.

Happily, the RE Amemiya FD3S RX-7 was chosen as the Car of the Week near the start of 2020, and, seeing as I already had a "review" for it written on my photo album, decided to copy–paste it here. I was met with very warm reception, which prompted me to give this club a chance and keep on keeping on and see what happens. I had a lot of insecurities and bad life experiences up to that point, and I had a lot of voices in my head telling me that I wasn't welcome, that I write too much, that I was drowning out everyone else who had smarter things to say written in a better manner. It's not entirely unfounded, because I still want to claw out my skull when I go back to read those early rambles I passed off as "reviews" back then. I think many people don't get past those insecurities and stop at that point. Hell, I could've sworn I was one such person.

But, no one said a bad thing to me aside from myself. And that was the only thing that allowed me to keep writing, and in doing so, slowly finding my own style of writing, finding out what works and what doesn't, which involved a lot of... experimentation. Right now, I still don't think I write the Shakespeare of car reviews, and I do miss a lot of the other talented writers that used to write regularly here, but I at least have come to a point where I'm not ashamed to show some of my more recent writing to friends and family.

I owe this gigantic 3 year journey to the kind and accepting folk here at COTW, and I can only hope to pass on this kindness and maintain the safe space when we transition to GT7. As I said, I'm a shy, quiet, withdrawn, and anti–social person at heart, and so I genuinely have no idea what the hell I'm doing organising a club of crazies, but if you guys think I'm the best guy you've got, then I'll do my best come April.

Again, I can't thank everyone here enough for your continued participation, banter, close and clean racing, and antics. Thank you thank you thank you!

View attachment 1243683

View attachment 1243695
Your reviews are the highlight of this thread my dude, next to my Nordschleife and Tsukuba runs of course... ;)
In all seriousness, I'm really glad you joined. I do think your writing, spirit, wit and knowledge are quite exceptional and I still think you should write professionally for a car magazine. I know I would hire you. Cheers mate.
 
View attachment 1243682

I, uh... might have gone a little overboard with the photo shoot, eheh.


Thanks to everyone that has been here through our 228–week journey, no matter how long you've been here! It feels stupidly clichéd to say, but there's no other way to put it: Car of the Week wouldn't be possible without everyone chipping in, be it via writing, racing, banter, debate, or just showing up week in and week out. Special thanks goes of course to Racer, for starting us off here on GT Sport. Real life had been catching up to him for years now, and I'm glad he stuck around for three more years to see us into GT7! And of course, special thanks also go to our resident Stig, Vic, for being the tireless trooper that he is, hosting almost all of our lobbies at 4 A.M. on his side!

If you'll indulge me in some personal cheesy storytime for a bit, joining Car of the Week was a pretty big and uncharacteristic move for me, as I'm usually very anti–social and withdrawn. I was going through a particularly rough time in my life, and it being 2020 certainly didn't help matters. One of the things my therapist left me with was that I should continually challenge myself to a reasonable extent, to go out of my comfort zone a bit and find a group to share a hobby or interest with. A sort of "safe space", I think she meant, where I can learn to express myself more.

Happily, the RE Amemiya FD3S RX-7 was chosen as the Car of the Week near the start of 2020, and, seeing as I already had a "review" for it written on my photo album, decided to copy–paste it here. I was met with very warm reception, which prompted me to give this club a chance and keep on keeping on and see what happens. I had a lot of insecurities and bad life experiences up to that point, and I had a lot of voices in my head telling me that I wasn't welcome, that I write too much, that I was drowning out everyone else who had smarter things to say written in a better manner. It's not entirely unfounded, because I still want to claw out my skull when I go back to read those early rambles I passed off as "reviews" back then. I think many people don't get past those insecurities and stop at that point. Hell, I could've sworn I was one such person.

But, no one said a bad thing to me aside from myself. And that was the only thing that allowed me to keep writing, and in doing so, slowly finding my own style of writing, finding out what works and what doesn't, which involved a lot of... experimentation. Right now, I still don't think I write the Shakespeare of car reviews, and I do miss a lot of the other talented writers that used to write regularly here, but I at least have come to a point where I'm not ashamed to show some of my more recent writing to friends and family.

I owe this gigantic 3 year journey to the kind and accepting folk here at COTW, and I can only hope to pass on this kindness and maintain the safe space when we transition to GT7. As I said, I'm a shy, quiet, withdrawn, and anti–social person at heart, and so I genuinely have no idea what the hell I'm doing organising a club of crazies, but if you guys think I'm the best guy you've got, then I'll do my best come April.

Again, I can't thank everyone here enough for your continued participation, banter, close and clean racing, and antics. Thank you thank you thank you!

View attachment 1243683

View attachment 1243695
Square, I think we’re all glad you joined thank you truly
 
Acceleration of the 86s for anyone, who still cares...


Final list of all NOT yet used cars of GTS:
A current list of all not yet used cars for COTW:

ALFA ROMEO (1)
Giulia TZ2 Carrozzata da Zagato CN.AR750106 1965 (Gr.X)

Alpine (3)
Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vision Gran Turismo Race Mode (Gr.X)

ASTON MARTIN (3)
DB3S CN.1 1953 (Gr.X)
DP-100 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vantage Gr.4 (Gr.4)

AUDI (5)
R8 LMS Audi Team Sport WRT 2015 (Gr.3)
R18 e-tron 2016 (Gr.1)
Sport quattro S1 Pikes Peak 1987 (Gr.B)
TTS Coupe 2014 (N300)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)

BMW (4)
M4 Coupe 2014 (N400)
M4 Safety Car (Gr.X)
M6 GT3 Walkenhorst Motorsport 2016 (Gr.3)
M6 GT3 M Power Livery 2016 (Gr.3)

BUGATTI (1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

CHEVROLET (1)
Corvette Stingray Race Concept (C2) 1959 (Gr.X)

DODGE (5)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Racing (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Street (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Technology (Gr.X)
Viper Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Viper SRT GT3-R 2015 (Gr.3)

FERRARI (4)
250 GT Berlinetta passo corto CN.2521 1961 (N300)
250 GTO CN.3729GT 1962 (Gr.X)
458 Italia 2009 (N600)
Dino 246GT 1971 (N200)

FORD (2)
GT LM Spec II Test Car (Gr.3)
Mustang Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)

GRAN TURISMO (2)
Red Bull X2014 Standard 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2014 Junior 2014 (Gr.X)

HONDA (3)
NSX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
NSX Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Sports Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

HYUNDAI (4)
Genesis Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Genesis Gr.4 (Gr.4)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

JAGUAR (5)
D-Type 1954 (Gr.X)
F-Type Gr.4 (Gr.4)
XJ13 1966 (Gr.X)
XJR-9 1988 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo Coupe (Gr.X)

LAMBORGHINI (2)
Aventador LP700-4 2011 (N700)
Miura P400 Bertone Prototype CN.0706 1967 (N400)

LEXUS (1)
LF-LC GT Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MAZDA (2)
Atenza Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
LM55 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MCLAREN (3)
650S GT3 2015 (Gr.3)
MP4-12c 2010 (N600)
Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MERCEDES-BENZ (5)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ (Gr.X)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ Color Variation (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo LH Edition (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo Racing Series (Gr.X)

MITSUBISHI (4)
Lancer Evolution IV GSR 1996 (N300)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Road Car (N500)

NISSAN (6)
Concept 2020 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GT-R Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
GT-R Motul Autech 2016 (Gr.2)
GT-R Premium Edition 2017 (N600)
GT-R Safety Car (Gr.X)
GT-R Xanavi Nismo (Gr.2)

PEUGEOT (4)
208 GTI by Peugeot Sport 2014 (N200)
RCZ Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
L750R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

PORSCHE (1)
911 GT3 (997) 2008 (N400)

RENAULT SPORT (1)
R.S.01 GT3 2016 (Gr.3)

SHELBY (1)
Cobra Daytona Coupe 1964 (Gr.X)

SUBARU (3)
WRX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
WRX Gr.B (Gr.B)
WRX STI Type S 2014 (N300)

TOYOTA (9)
86 Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
86 GRMN 2016 (N200)
86 GT Limited 2016 (N200)
FT-1 (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
GR Supra Racing Concept (Gr.3)
GR Supra RZ 2020 (N400)
TS030 Hybrid 2012 (Gr.1)

VOLKSWAGEN (4)
Scirocco Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Golf VII GTI 2014 (N200)
GTI Roadster Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GTI Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)

Final list of all NOT yet used cars of GTS AND GT7 (a list for me only basically, to track certain stuff)

ALFA ROMEO (1)
Giulia TZ2 Carrozzata da Zagato CN.AR750106 1965 (Gr.X)

Alpine (3)
Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vision Gran Turismo Race Mode (Gr.X)

ASTON MARTIN (3)
DB3S CN.1 1953 (Gr.X)
DP-100 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vantage Gr.4 (Gr.4)

AUDI (5)
R8 LMS Audi Team Sport WRT 2015 (Gr.3)
R18 e-tron 2016 (Gr.1)
Sport quattro S1 Pikes Peak 1987 (Gr.B)
TTS Coupe 2014 (N300)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)

BMW (4)
M4 Coupe 2014 (N400)
M4 Safety Car (Gr.X)
M6 GT3 Walkenhorst Motorsport 2016 (Gr.3)
M6 GT3 M Power Livery 2016 (Gr.3)

BUGATTI (1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

CHEVROLET (1)
Corvette Stingray Race Concept (C2) 1959 (Gr.X)

DODGE (5)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Racing (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Street (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Technology (Gr.X)
Viper Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Viper SRT GT3-R 2015 (Gr.3)

FERRARI (4)
250 GT Berlinetta passo corto CN.2521 1961 (N300)
250 GTO CN.3729GT 1962 (Gr.X)
458 Italia 2009 (N600)
Dino 246GT 1971 (N200)

FORD (2)
GT LM Spec II Test Car (Gr.3)
Mustang Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)

GRAN TURISMO (2)
Red Bull X2014 Standard 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2014 Junior 2014 (Gr.X)

HONDA (3)
NSX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
NSX Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Sports Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

HYUNDAI (4)
Genesis Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Genesis Gr.4 (Gr.4)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

JAGUAR (5)
D-Type 1954 (Gr.X)
F-Type Gr.4 (Gr.4)
XJ13 1966 (Gr.X)
XJR-9 1988 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo Coupe (Gr.X)

LAMBORGHINI (2)
Aventador LP700-4 2011 (N700)
Miura P400 Bertone Prototype CN.0706 1967 (N400)

LEXUS (1)
LF-LC GT Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MAZDA (2)
Atenza Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
LM55 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MCLAREN (3)
650S GT3 2015 (Gr.3)
MP4-12c 2010 (N600)
Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MERCEDES-BENZ (5)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ (Gr.X)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ Color Variation (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo LH Edition (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo Racing Series (Gr.X)

MITSUBISHI (4)
Lancer Evolution IV GSR 1996 (N300)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Road Car (N500)

NISSAN (6)
Concept 2020 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GT-R Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
GT-R Motul Autech 2016 (Gr.2)
GT-R Premium Edition 2017 (N600)
GT-R Safety Car (Gr.X)
GT-R Xanavi Nismo (Gr.2)

PEUGEOT (4)
208 GTI by Peugeot Sport 2014 (N200)
RCZ Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
L750R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

PORSCHE (1)
911 GT3 (997) 2008 (N400)

RENAULT SPORT (1)
R.S.01 GT3 2016 (Gr.3)

SHELBY (1)
Cobra Daytona Coupe 1964 (Gr.X)

SUBARU (3)
WRX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
WRX Gr.B (Gr.B)
WRX STI Type S 2014 (N300)

TOYOTA (8)
86 Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
86 GRMN 2016 (N200)
86 GT Limited 2016 (N200)
FT-1 (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GR Supra Racing Concept (Gr.3)
GR Supra RZ 2020 (N400)
TS030 Hybrid 2012 (Gr.1)

VOLKSWAGEN (4)
Scirocco Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Golf VII GTI 2014 (N200)
GTI Roadster Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GTI Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
 
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