Car of the Week 228: COTY GTS Finale

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A current list of all not yet used cars for COTW:

ABARTH (1)

1500 Biposto Bertone B.A.T 1 1952 (N100)

ALFA ROMEO (3)
4C Launch Edition 2014 (N200)
Giulia TZ2 Carrozzata da Zagato CN.AR750106 1965 (Gr.X)
MiTo 1.4 T Sport 2009 (N200)

Alpine (3)
Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vision Gran Turismo Race Mode (Gr.X)

ASTON MARTIN (5)
DB3S CN.1 1953 (Gr.X)
DB11 2016 (N600)
DP-100 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vantage Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Vulcan 2016 (N800)

AUDI (8)
R8 LMS Audi Team Sport WRT 2015 (Gr.3)
R18 TDI Audi Team Sport Joest 2011 (Gr.1)
R18 TDI Le Mans 2011 (Gr.1)
R18 e-tron 2016 (Gr.1)
Sport quattro S1 Pikes Peak 1987 (Gr.B)
TT Cup 2016 (Gr.4)
TTS Coupe 2014 (N300)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)

BMW (4)
M4 Coupe 2014 (N400)
M4 Safety Car (Gr.X)
M6 GT3 Walkenhorst Motorsport 2016 (Gr.3)
M6 GT3 M Power Livery 2016 (Gr.3)

BUGATTI (3)
Veyron Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Vision Gran Turismo Gr.1 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

CHEVROLET (1)
Corvette Stingray Race Concept (C2) 1959 (Gr.X)

CITROËN (1)
GT by Citroen Gr.4 (Gr.4)

DODGE (9)
Charger SRT Hellcat Safety Car (N700)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Gr.1 (Gr.1)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Racing (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Street (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Technology (Gr.X)
Superbee 1970 (N300)
Viper Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Viper SRT10 Coupe 2006 (N500)
Viper SRT GT3-R 2015 (Gr.3)

FERRARI (5)
250 GT Berlinetta passo corto CN.2521 1961 (N300)
250 GTO CN.3729GT 1962 (Gr.X)
458 Italia 2009 (N600)
458 Italia GT3 2013 (Gr.3)
Dino 246GT 1971 (N200)

FIAT (1)
500 F 1968 (N100)

FORD (7)
Focus Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
GT 2006 (N600)
GT LM Spec II Test Car (Gr.3)
Mustang Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
Mustang Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Mustang GT Premium Fastback 2015 (N400)
Mustang Mach 1 1971 (N300)

GRAN TURISMO (5)
Amuse S2000 GT1 Turbo (N600)
Chris Holstrom Concepts 1967 Chevy Nova 2013 (N700)
Red Bull X2014 Standard 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2014 Junior 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2019 Competition (Gr.X)

HONDA (4)
NSX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
NSX Gr.4 (Gr.4)
S800 1966 (N100)
Sports Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

HYUNDAI (4)
Genesis Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Genesis Gr.4 (Gr.4)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

INFINITI (1)
Concept Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

JAGUAR (6)
D-Type 1954 (Gr.X)
E-Type Coupe 1961 (N300)
F-Type Gr.4 (Gr.4)
XJ13 1966 (Gr.X)
XJR-9 1988 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo Coupe (Gr.X)

KTM (1)
X-BOW R 2012 (N300)

LAMBORGHINI (6)
Aventador LP700-4 2011 (N700)
Aventador LP750-4 Superveloce 2015 (N800)
Countach LP400 1974 (N400)
Huracan Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Huracan LP610-4 2015 (N600)
Miura P400 Bertone Prototype CN.0706 1967 (N400)

LEXUS (4)
LC500 2017 (N500)
LF-LC GT Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
RC F au Tom's 2016 (Gr.2)
RC F Gr.4 (Gr.4)

MAZDA (8)
Atenza Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
Atenza Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Atenza Sedan XD L Package 2015 (N200)
Demio XD Touring 2015 (N100)
LM55 Vision Gran Turismo Gr.1 (Gr.1)
LM55 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Roadster S 2015 (N100)
RX-Vision GT3 Concept 2020 (Gr.3)

MCLAREN (5)
650S GT3 2015 (Gr.3)
MP4-12c 2010 (N600)
P1 GTR 2016 (Gr.X)
Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo Gr.1 (Gr.1)
Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MERCEDES-BENZ (7)
A45 AMG 4MATIC 2013 (N400)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ (Gr.X)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ Color Variation (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo LH Edition (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo Racing Series (Gr.X)
Sauber C9 1989 (Gr.1)

MINI (2)
Cooper S 2005 (N200)
Clubman Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MITSUBISHI (4)
Lancer Evolution IV GSR 1996 (N300)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Road Car (N500)

NISSAN (10)
Concept 2020 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Fairlady Z Version S 2007 (N300)
GT-R Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
GT-R Motul Autech 2016 (Gr.2)
GT-R Premium Edition 2017 (N600)
GT-R Safety Car (Gr.X)
GT-R Xanavi Nismo (Gr.2)
R92CP 1992 (Gr.1)
Skyline GT-R V-spec (R33) 1997 (N300)
Skyline GT-R V-spec II Nür (R34) 2002 (N300)

PEUGEOT (9)
208 GTI by Peugeot Sport 2014 (N200)
908 HDI FAP Team Peugeot Total 2010 (Gr.1)
RCZ Gr.3 (Gr.3)
RCZ Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
RCZ Gr.4 (Gr.4)
RCZ Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
L500R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.X)
L750R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

PORSCHE (2)
911 GT3 (997) 2008 (N400)
962C 1988 (Gr.1)

RENAULT SPORT (4)
Clio RS 220 EDC Trophy 2015 (N200)
Clio RS 220 EDC Trophy 2016 (N200)
Megane RS Trophy 2011 Safety Car (N300)
R.S.01 GT3 2016 (Gr.3)

SHELBY (1)
Cobra Daytona Coupe 1964 (Gr.X)

SUBARU (6)
BRZ S 2015 (N200)
BRZ Falken Tire/Turn 14 Distribution 2017 (Gr.X)
Impreza Coupe WRX Type R STi Version VI 1999 (N300)
WRX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
WRX Gr.B (Gr.B)
WRX STI Type S 2014 (N300)

TESLA (1)
Model S Signature Performance 2012 (Gr.X)

TOYOTA (16)
86 Gr.4 (Gr.4)
86 Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
86 GRMN 2016 (N200)
86 GT 2015 (N200)
86 GT Limited 2016 (N200)
Corolla Levin 3door 1600GT APEX (AE86) 1983 (N100)
Crown Athlete G Safety Car (N300)
FT-1 (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
GR Supra Racing Concept (Gr.3)
GR Supra RZ 2020 (N400)
S-FR 2015 (N100)
Sprinter Trueno 3door 1600GT APEX (AE86) 1983 (N100)
TS030 Hybrid 2012 (Gr.1)
Tundra TRD Pro 2019 (N400)

VOLKSWAGEN (6)
1200 1966 (N100)
Scirocco Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Golf VII GTI 2014 (N200)
GTI Roadster Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GTI Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Samba Bus Type 2 (T1) 1962 (N100)
 
My reaction to this week’s COTW:


OH HELL NAW.

I tried driving this car during the week we ran the Zagato VGT and my god, the understeer on the GTI VGT was atrocious. It understeered so much that like the Veneno, I had to lift off through corners that are normally flat out, which is mind-boggling considering that the GTI makes about 200 fewer horses compared to the Veneno and actually has front end downforce unlike the Veneno. It’s like VW took a donor car from the scummiest used car dealership in the world(NSFW for language) and simply slapped the bodyshell on top.

I’m going to call it now: it’s going to end up like the Zagato VGT where almost everyone dumps the GTI after one race and starts hunting for alternatives that can actually take a corner without veering off to another dimension. I won’t be there to watch it happen though, since I got real life commitments tomorrow.

Here’s the replay of my one (and only) outing with this mobile junkyard.
 
The 2016 Chevrolet Camaro SS, huh?


It might be an insane notion to behold, but with the addition of the ZL1 1LE Camaro into the game and with it having won our PRESTEGIOUS Car of the Year 2019 award, the Corvette engined, MagneRide equipped Camaro SS is surprisingly tame in the context of this game. So, does the Camaro SS offer something its younger and badder brother doesn't? Or is this week's Car of the Week simply a car for the weak?


I'd say it depends entirely on what you're looking for in a car. The SS is a very softly sprung car, which isn't a very enticing thought when said springs prop up a car weighing 1,672kg (3,686lbs), 54% of which uncomfortably up front where a "small" block 6.2L V8 sits. That said, the SS does hide its mass rather well, stopping short and showing little unwillingness into corners. While the ZL1 shows almost GT4 racecar levels of stiffness and immediacy, the SS is more of an involving, engaging road car that emphasises cognizant weight transfers and equally careful inputs simply because it's a much more "mortal" car.


Because it is much more "mortal" of a car that resembles a road car more than a racecar, I personally think that a driver will learn much more about car control and perceiving nuances from a car, along with training the muscle memory to react and correct accordingly if they were stuck into the leather–appointed bucket seat of the SS. If given enough time to learn about it, the SS can duly reward and be an engaging and exhilarating drive all the same. It feels delectably balanced when behind the wheel; I'm not talking about the weight distribution of the car, but rather, how every component of the car comes together when taking a corner, without any one component being an obvious limiting factor to bottleneck the whole experience. Take a corner, and the car as a whole comes alive—the front tyres struggle for grip, the rear tyres threaten to break grip as they reach for the sky, the suspension wallows and lets weight slosh over any tyre you so choose, the steering is brilliantly communicative despite the humongous stress put over the front tyres, all while the car begs for engine braking. I know it sounds awful on paper, but in practice, it means that nothing can be taken for granted in the car, with every communicative component cohesively approaching their limits together, making for an intensively engaging and technical drive. Drivers will have to learn to be gentle and smooth with the steering wheel, the pedals, the weight transfer, and learn to listen for the tyres and knowing when each has grip and which don't.


Because of how collectively every aspect of car control and component blends together and approaches their limits as a whole when tackling a corner in the SS, the car can and will kick up a fuss in any number of ways you ask it to if you were to deliberately disrupt the fine knife edge balance that is the SS' handling limits by playing with any of the ingredients, any of the tools you as a driver have at your disposal, be it via being slightly too rough with the steering wheels, any of the three pedals, playing with the car's orientation and weight balance, or even the handbrake if you're feeling feisty, and the car will respond with the same linearity, precision, and willingness as if you were to ask it to trace a graceful, surgical racing line even in that self–inflicted chaos. As a result, the SS I find is a car that's not only capable of putting down impressive lap times and skidpad numbers, but also as a plaything. Understeer? Oversteer? Kansei dorifuto? Doughnuts? Transitioning from any one of the aforementioned into another? It can and it will, if you have the skills and knowledge to make it dance. So willing and encouraging is the SS in fact, that even someone like me attempted to drift in it!


Because of how much freedom and control it affords its drivers however, it's absolutely not a car that will save you if you make a mistake on the track. I find that, as a result, the SS is not a car that is very receptive to being pushed by its driver—it demands respect and will not hesitate to bite if mistreated. It requires not just steady hands and feet, but also a cognizant finger on the pulse of the car at all times. I must admit that I tend to fold quite easily under the pressure of racing, and I think I tend to push harder than I should when chasing or being chased by that guy, which I've come to find out firsthand is behaviour that the SS harshly punishes. The car is like a punching bag not only in what it'd let you do to it, but also in how it will rebound and smack you in the face with equal force if you aren't careful and give it the opening to retaliate. I've come to deeply respect those who can race this thing as–is in a high pressure situation, because that says to me that the driver is calm, collected, and cognizant even under threat. It's precisely that honesty and freedom in how the SS handles itself and its relationship with the driver that makes it something of a rarity in today's cars that are rapidly getting faster, safer, but more and more disconnected as they try to straddle the line between speed and safety. Despite being big, heavy, and packing enough torque to jump start a planet, the SS oddly reminded me of my beloved FD RX-7 in not just how cohesive the driving experience feels, but also in how it demands a certain level of respect and understanding from its driver. Both cars share a striking similarity in how they let me behave and be pretty when I want to, and kick up a spectacular fuss when I feel like letting my hair down. I can very easily see the Camaro SS being the FD RX-7 or 993 911 for somebody else who grew up in a different time or place, and that coming from me is high praise, whatever that amounts to.


A car for the weak? On the contrary, I think the Camaro SS can be the preferred tool for someone of sound technique and unbreakable mind. A person who knows when "enough is enough", and can appreciate what they have without breaking their bank(s). As for what the SS offers that the ZL1 doesn't, I think it is a better teacher of car control and driving techniques, and a much more engaging drive. I think that the ZL1 has lost a fair bit of the SS' playfulness and flexibility in having to rein in its monstrous 650HP—not that anyone can blame it for that. Besides, offering the brute force of a Chevy "small" block and the wizardry of a MagneRide suspension at a mere 36K credits is simply mind boggling, and is definitely something anyone can be proud of buying and having. I am definitely curious to see how close I can get to the ZL1's performance with the SS within the former's budget when GT7 comes. But for now, the Camaro SS is a Sublime Sleeper all the same.

 
Kinda summed up the Camaro SS in a nutshell there @XSquareStickIt if i’m honest. :P

It’s relatively low priced, has a solid amount of performance and can be a good introduction to driving high powered rear wheel drive machines.

A car which IRL can also be spec’d with the 1LE track package like it’s Supercharged counterpart (albeit not as extreme.) so it can handle even better.

For less than 40K and only a minor power detune, you can have a capable N400 machine right out the box. ;)

Like it’s Supercharged brother, It’s a Sleeper. :)👍

The other car to review is not as cheap, but it’s also capable.

I’m of course referring to the Volkswagen Golf GTI Supersport VGT.

The second of VW’s VGT’s after the Golf GTI Roadster VGT, it shares the same 3 litre twin turbo VR6 engine, the same 4wd system and the same 7 speed Dual Clutch gearbox.

Despite one being an open top and the other a hard top, they both weigh 1200kgs too.

So if they are so alike under the skin, how do you decide between them?

Well if you want a cockpit view, then the Roadster wins that one. :lol:

So you’re probably wondering, Is the Supersport version of the VGT obsolete?

With Gr3 covered by the Beetle and Golf VGT Roadster, it might appear to be a good car with no place to go aside from VGT events in Career mode.

But thanks to The Cutting Room Floor, The VGT Supersport DID have a group to race in.

FFD2B3DE-4806-4049-BBAC-A0F05694D735.png

GrB to be precise. :sly:

But in all honesty, it’s just as quick as it’s Gr3 counterparts in GrX, but VW could’ve benefited with a GrB rally car in its ranks.

When all’s said and done however, driving the Supersport Golf was a blast to drive and no interior notwithstanding, is a car to get if you love the Dub.

The V Dub to be exact. :D

Verdict: Sleeper 🙂👍
 
551HP. 1,200kg. 3 doors, 7 speeds, and All Wheel Drive. Volkswagen's second entry into the realm of Vision Gran Turismo cars might have been the very first to attempt to have some semblance of relevance for the people, both for outsiders looking for casual eye candy, and for those actually playing the game; the Volkswagen GTI Supersport Vision Gran Turismo is essentially a Golf that got way too hot about the game, and therefore sports a serious boy racer body kit, while having specs that would seemingly make it an easy fit into both Gr. 3 and Gr. B competition with minimal modification, chief among which has to be the addition of a fuel inlet. I mean, come on, seriously?


Yet, somehow, unlike its stable mates, the Beetle, Scirocco, and even the GTI Roadster VGT, the Supersport is the only one that doesn't represent the brand in any sanctioned category of racing. Of course, as Vic has helpfully pointed out already, the SS was supposed to have a modified Gr. B variant, but was cut for unknown reasons. My last minute, low effort livery on race day is supposed to take after said Gr. B version of the SS. It literally is just three more Volkswagen scripts, a VW logo on the roof, two tow arrows, and some drill holes on the bonnet where the fog lights would install. Hey, at least give me points for initiative with the holes, okay?


See, Square, this is what happens when you procrastinate and rewrite things too much with your stupid perfectionism now someone else dropped that bombshell and now you look like a limp dick ripoff chump what is finishing after him most races not bad enough for you and now you gotta finish behind him in writing too?

As a VGT car, there are several annoyances I struggle to look past that are common among VGTs, such as its million credit asking price, how utterly useless it is in this game, and a par for course black hole of an interior. If you can afford to sustain the niche hobby of launching your credits into black holes however, there's actually quite a lot to like about the SS; it stops well, slices into corners well, and certainly goes like stink, especially off the line. Its AWD, light weight, and racing slick tyres are all indispensable ingredients in facilitating a strong launch, and yet the SS still manages to wheelspin off the line in first in spite of all that! In our lobbies, we always use grid starts, and that's when the SS felt like a cardiac arrest simulator, as there's always the threat of the persistent grid start bug. It really is a car that can bring you from 0–60–dead in just under two seconds if you aren't paying attention.


More than any of that however, the thing I love most about the SS is Lapiz Blue. I think it's the second most beautiful paintjob in the world, but I'm only saying that because I'm faithful to a fault. It has such a mesmerising, deep contrast, complemented by tiny sparkles under its confidently gleaming clear coat, I just want to melt into it and become one with it. About half the field during race day had Lapiz Blue SSes as their base car, though the only one I have, a prize from the daily wheel, is in Reflex Silver, which made up about the other half of the field. If Gran Turismo 7 lets us obtain paint chips just from buying the car it comes with like in GT5, I would pump millions upon millions of credits into a probably very puzzled Volkswagen dealership just for Lapiz Blue paint chips alone.


As things currently stand however, there's a less than zero chance that I'll spend my own hard–earned credits for the SS, and that's because I can't seem to wrap my head around how the thing drives.

The specs of the car and its default Racing Hard tyres allow it to reach GT3 levels of straight line speed, but it certainly doesn't have GT3 levels of cornering speeds due to it understandably having some power understeer on exits. As such, despite the car being able to go, stop, and slice into apexes like a GT3 car, it requires drivers to set it up for a corner in a fashion much more akin to an FF cup car instead of a RWD GT3; slow down amply for a corner, and then get the car rotated just that bit more before nailing the apex to set the car up for its predictable power understeer on exits, which will take some uncomfortable undoing of learned habits if you've been frequenting GT3 and Gr. 3 machinery that is this game's focus for four years. It's such a shame because this could be a completely negligible issue had the car just come with an adjustable centre differential like the Gr. B race cars. While the car cannot fit dirt tyres, the few excursions off the beaten path I've had with the car suggests to me that the torque split is set up for dirt driving, and I'm not entirely sure if the prior knowledge that a Gr. B version of this car is supposed to exist has predisposed me towards that conclusion.


Thankfully, the car does stop a little better than a typical Gr. 3 car, being lighter than most with BoP applied and with the extra drag of its hatchback body style helping bring it to a halt quickly. However, this is also where a big part of the confusion lies for me: the slightly lower cornering speeds and the slightly quicker deceleration in comparison to a Gr. 3 car creates a weird mental dichotomy for me as I have to adjust my braking points for each and every corner of tracks that I think I know well, such as Bathurst: I have to brake earlier for most corners to set the car up for its understeer on corner exits, but I can be a little braver and later on the brakes on hard braking zones, such as going from Conrod Straight into The Chase? It's a bit of a "findmuck" for me personally, if you catch my drift.


Add to all that the fact that the car just seemingly has no consistency in how it behaves from corner to corner, any sort of linearity in how it approaches its limits, nor makes any attempt to communicate to me at any time, and the SS is more than just a confusing drive; it's vague and downright dangerous—ask Rick if you don't believe me, whom I collected after wiping out at Bathurst's McPhillamy Park, and then promptly went off at the same corner again in a four lap race... at a track I'm most confident on.


It's hard to describe what exactly is so weird about the driving dynamics of the SS, given that I still feel no more knowledgeable about how it drives after all this time than when I first joined the week's lobby with a fresh odometer, but I'll try, anyway: the car's turning radius is just... too disproportionate with its speed. It stops and turns well when coasting and braking, but on fast sweepers where you don't have to completely lift off the throttle, such as the aforementioned McPhillamy Park, it felt as if the differential never lets go of the axles of the car, resulting in horrific, unexpected understeer at speeds I'd like to think no mere mortal can adequately react to. The car itself seemingly makes no attempt to communicate to me via tyre squeals, steering feel, or any other avenue of communication until it exceeds its limits, which makes trying to understand the car and feeling one's way up to its limits a complete crapshoot. As a result of this, I always felt like I was underutilising the car's full capabilities, and I have a whole afternoon's worth of dead last (or near enough thereabouts) results to prove that gut feeling true. When I try to turn it harder or give it gas sooner however, the entire car just gets paralysed with understeer. It seemed to me in the replays that my peers were chucking the car into a corner in a violent, sudden fashion, almost as though driving on dirt, while I'm trying to soothe and ease the car into corners with gradual, smooth trail braking. Maybe this front heavy, AWD hatch demands to be abused and manhandled that way, but I'm just not conditioned to think that treating a car that way is okay.


A lot of the car's performance I feel is thanks to the immense grip of the front tyres; I theorise that it really, really hates downgraded or worn rubber, hence why RX8 loathed the car so much when he drove it on Sport Soft tyres when we tested the Zagato. Thing is, with a front heavy hatch putting down more of the 411kW through the front tyres than it should, the car destroys front tyres faster than dieselgate destroyed the stock prices of VAG. I really don't fancy the thought of driving this in the wet, or with any meaningful tyre wear multiplier, nor do I think a RWD conversion to fit into Gr. 3 would be feasible for this car with its lopsided weight distribution.


I didn't much like the Beetle Gr. 3 in the short distance I've driven mine, but even that thing feels more predictable than the SS despite having a tiny, peaky turbocharged engine outputting 591HP, not to mention having way better tyre life as well. It's so weird how being AWD seems to be a curse more than anything in this game; you'd think giving a Nissan GT-R back its ATTESA AWD, the car that can be cited for the widespread ban of AWD on tarmac races, would cause total anarchy and annihilation, but noooope, the GT-R Gr. 4 is almost the worst car you could pick for its category (this is my mini review of the GT-R Gr. 4 I'm sorry Nismo). Similarly, one would think that having a powerful AWD car weighing only 2,646lbs with aero would make for an absolute weapon, but... the SS sucks so much that its Roadster and Beetle siblings made it to Gr. 3 when it couldn't.


Is it a bad car? If I force myself to be a bit more factual than usual, I really can't say. It could be fast, it could be fun. It certainly doesn't belong in the same conversation as other garbage cars we've tested here like the Vijizz and Veneno, but it's oddly kryptonitic for Singaporean weebs. I just personally can't get a read on the car, much less mesh with it. For my own million credits, I'd even take a BMW VGT, a car that I said I'm "ambivalent" towards, over the SS. Or, you know, I could just get a Gr. 3 AND a Gr. B cars and still have 100k change left over. The only thing I cherish from my time with the SS is Lapiz Blue, and my car isn't even blue. Boo.
 
The Peugeot RCZ Gr3 is quite the anomaly for the Gr3 class, why you may ask?

Compared to the rest of Gr3 which have road car counterparts, the RCZ has the biggest level of modifications done to it.

All of them are wider, all the 4wd cars have there front driveshafts removed, the Atenza has its Diesel road engine swapped, but the RCZ has its engine moved to behind the driver and power is rerouted to the rear tyres.

Now of course the Gr3 Road Car homologates it for that, but if that’s the case, why does the GrB version of the RCZ benefit from it as GrB’s only mid engined car? 🧐

But I digress. :P

The RCZ Gr3 is actually a stable machine and if you time your corner exits right, you can jump on the power earlier than you think.

As seen in the replays I shared, it’s capable of putting on a good show with the right hands involved. :D

Overall, it’s very likely the better overall machine of the two Gr3 Lions on offer.

Verdict: Sleeper :)👍
 
How does that work? I'm off work in a couple weeks and will have some spare time, not normally the sort of thing I'm good at, but if nobody else will do it, I'll give it my best
Every Year we have the awards for Car of the Year and Beater of the Year and plus extra awards for other cars that people vote on. You write up something to explain why this car deserved that title. Also we give an award to the most improved player of the group and a few others. The group sends in their nomination to the person in charge of doing the awards. You can look back on 2020, 2019, and 2018 to see how it all went.
 
Every Year we have the awards for Car of the Year and Beater of the Year and plus extra awards for other cars that people vote on. You write up something to explain why this car deserved that title. Also we give an award to the most improved player of the group and a few others. The group sends in their nomination to the person in charge of doing the awards. You can look back on 2020, 2019, and 2018 to see how it all went.

Every Year we have the awards for Car of the Year and Beater of the Year and plus extra awards for other cars that people vote on. You write up something to explain why this car deserved that title. Also we give an award to the most improved player of the group and a few others. The group sends in their nomination to the person in charge of doing the awards. You can look back on 2020, 2019, and 2018 to see how it all went.
Okay man, I remember last years, I will do up a few categories, but if anybody wants to suggest any that would be super helpful.
I will try my best to do a creative and fun write up. Not really my wheel house, (mechanic and driver) but I think I can have some fun with it with a bit of help from you guys.
 
What a year it has been, but we are comming to the end of it, time to say good riddance to 2021.
On with the good stuff, we have driven some pretty great and some not so awesome cars this year, so the first two categories pretty much go without saying, Car of the Year and Beater of the Year. After that, as stated above, Most improved driver, Driver of the year, and maybe Best sportsman.(cleanest driver). As last year, Best livery designer. Any other suggestions would be really helpful. Thanks ahead of time guys and gals.
 
What a year it has been, but we are comming to the end of it, time to say good riddance to 2021.
On with the good stuff, we have driven some pretty great and some not so awesome cars this year, so the first two categories pretty much go without saying, Car of the Year and Beater of the Year. After that, as stated above, Most improved driver, Driver of the year, and maybe Best sportsman.(cleanest driver). As last year, Best livery designer. Any other suggestions would be really helpful. Thanks ahead of time guys and gals.
Prettiest und ugliest car.
 
Here's a link to the 2014 COTW Beater or Sleeper awards, post #1281. I'd forgotten McCLarenDesign's sense of humor with the categories!

 
Here's a link to the 2014 COTW Beater or Sleeper awards, post #1281. I'd forgotten McCLarenDesign's sense of humor with the categories!

Definitely MCD had a good sense of humor with COTW awards and when he would announce them.
 

GTS Nordschleife hot lap STOCK Fiat 500 F '68: 14.22.063​

That's the slowest car for ya, have fun! ;) In all seriousness, it was surprisingly fun to wrestle this thing around a track. It really ALL comes down to momentum with this car. It's kinda ironic, because with such a slow car, you need to be MUCH more delicate with the steering, braking, as you really need all that momentum for the next straight after a corner. If you loose some of it in a turn, you'll automatically loose an insane amount of time on the next straight.

Driven stock on hard sport tyres without any driving aids, except ABS. First lap in third person view, second one in cockpit view and third one in cinematic replay view. All driven laps are the same lap.

Comparison with Tsukuba rival:



Verdict: Man idk, kinda neutral. I mean sure, it's incredibly slow, but is has like what? 17 HP?
 
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It's right there in the car's description: the RCZ's timeless and striking body is supposed to lend itself to a rear–mid engined sports car. We all know by now that the RCZ that eventually made it to customers' hands is an FF typical of the French, but imagine if you will, what the RCZ could've been competing against both on and off the racetrack had it been RMR as the 308 RCZ Concept was: Lotus Elises, Alpine A110s, Alfa 4Cs, Porsche Caymans, and dare I say, maybe even the Audi R8?


Well, this week, we're exploring the track side of that fantasy, as we're taking a look at the Peugeot RCZ Gr. 3 race car: an RCZ that has its engine behind the cockpit, fed by a bevy of handsome RAM air intakes on both the sides and top of the car that makes the road car a little lacking to look at, to produce well over three times the power of the road car while weighing slightly less, at 516HP (385kW) and 1,200kg (2,646lbs), slightly more of each if the current BoP is applied, and also if you're a fat Asian kid who spent about an hour wrapping his RCZ in carbon only to be denied entry into the lobby. Come on, 5 kilos of wraps should be morally obligated to provide 5 more WHP, aren't they?


As a result of this pubescent transformation, the previously meek French coupé now shares a stage with industry juggernauts, such as Porsche 911s, Ferrari 458s, Lamborghini Huracáns, and of course, the aforementioned Audi R8s. Oh, and, uh... the 4C too I guess. It's... back there somewhere, I think, I guess, maybe? That must've bogged off the line and then launched itself into orbit when it ran over a dry leaf T1. So, the question this week is, should Peugeot have stuck to their mid–mounted guns with the RCZ? Or can the RCZ not control its newfound edginess in a field of adults (and grandpas)?

@Pickle_Rick74 is that... blood, on your car?

The road–going RCZ's driving dynamics never did offer much to write home about, and the maddened mid–engined Gr. 3 monster somehow manages to retain that nondescript handling characteristic that keeps the road car safe. In context of the Gr. 3 car however, I mean that in a good way, as the RCZ offers a no drama, no surprises drive. The turbocharged unit in the RCZ Gr. 3 has enough torque to lug the car out of a corner in a higher gear if the ratios don't match the corner or if fuel is an issue, making for great flexibility in how it can be driven. As for handling, it's a car that's difficult to upset despite being RMR, all without showing any hint of unwillingness into corners. It's just delightfully neutral, and therefore easy to drive. Being a Gr. 3 car built from the ground up for this game, it doesn't have horrifying alignment issues that plague other RMR cars of its category, such as the infamous 458 GT3 and Huracán GT3, and in comparison to the other fictitious MR Gr. 3 cars, the 4C Gr. 3 gets bopped as hard by kerbs as it does BoP, and the NSX Gr. 3 can be quite feisty according to Max Verstappen himself; and who am I to disagree?


I really wanted to run another one of Rob's picks, the 911 RSR, against the RCZ Gr. 3 during race day, not just to see how the RCZ stacks up against a fellow car that has its engine sensibly shifted into the correct position for racing, but also because I think the RSR is the only RMR car with the ease of use to match the RCZ in Gr. 3 currently. The game's network might have had other plans, but the RCZ is a very solid all–rounder all the same regardless.


And it makes me yearn for a road legal, RMR RCZ.
 
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It's right there in the car's description: the RCZ's timeless and striking body is supposed to lend itself to a rear–mid engined sports car. We all know by now that the RCZ that eventually made it to customers' hands is an FF typical of the French, but imagine if you will, what the RCZ could've been competing against both on and off the racetrack had it been RMR as the 308 RCZ Concept was: Lotus Elises, Alpine A110s, Alfa 4Cs, Porsche Caymans, and dare I say, maybe even the Audi R8?


Well, this week, we're exploring the track side of that fantasy, as we're taking a look at the Peugeot RCZ Gr. 3 race car: an RCZ that has its engine behind the cockpit, fed by a bevy of handsome RAM air intakes on both the sides and top of the car that makes the road car a little lacking to look at, to produce well over three times the power of the road car while weighing slightly less, at 516HP (385kW) and 1,200kg (2,646lbs), slightly more of each if the current BoP is applied, and also if you're a fat Asian kid who spent about an hour wrapping his RCZ in carbon only to be denied entry into the lobby. Come on, 5 kilos of wraps should be morally obligated to provide 5 more WHP, aren't they?


As a result of this pubescent transformation, the previously meek French coupé now shares a stage with industry juggernauts, such as Porsche 911s, Ferrari 458s, Lamborghini Huracáns, and of course, the aforementioned Audi R8s. Oh, and, uh... the 4C too I guess. It's... back there somewhere, I think, I guess, maybe? That must've bogged off the line and then launched itself into orbit when it ran over a dry leaf T1. So, the question this week is, should Peugeot have stuck to their mid–mounted guns with the RCZ? Or can the RCZ not control its newfound edginess in a field of adults (and grandpas)?

@Pickle_Rick74 is that... blood, on your car?

The road–going RCZ's driving dynamics never did offer much to write home about, and the maddened mid–engined Gr. 3 monster somehow manages to retain that nondescript handling characteristic that keeps the road car safe. In context of the Gr. 3 car however, I mean that in a good way, as the RCZ offers a no drama, no surprises drive. The turbocharged unit in the RCZ Gr. 3 has enough torque to lug the car out of a corner in a higher gear if the ratios don't match the corner or if fuel is an issue, making for great flexibility in how it can be driven. As for handling, it's a car that's difficult to upset despite being RMR, all without showing any hint of unwillingness into corners. It's just delightfully neutral, and therefore easy to drive. Being a Gr. 3 car built from the ground up for this game, it doesn't have horrifying alignment issues that plague other RMR cars of its category, such as the infamous 458 GT3 and Huracán GT3, and in comparison to the other fictitious MR Gr. 3 cars, the 4C Gr. 3 gets bopped as hard by kerbs as it does BoP, and the NSX Gr. 3 can be quite feisty according to Max Verstappen himself; and who am I to disagree?


I really wanted to run another one of Rob's picks, the 911 RSR, against the RCZ Gr. 3 during race day, not just to see how the RCZ stacks up against a fellow car that has its engine sensibly shifted into the correct position for racing, but also because I think the RSR is the only RMR car with the ease of use to match the RCZ in Gr. 3 currently. The game's network might have had other plans, but the RCZ is a very solid all–rounder all the same regardless.


And it makes me yearn for a road legal, RMR RCZ.
I love the gif! So cool!
 
It's right there in the car's description: the RCZ's timeless and striking body is supposed to lend itself to a rear–mid engined sports car. We all know by now that the RCZ that eventually made it to customers' hands is an FF typical of the French, but imagine if you will, what the RCZ could've been competing against both on and off the racetrack had it been RMR as the 308 RCZ Concept was: Lotus Elises, Alpine A110s, Alfa 4Cs, Porsche Caymans, and dare I say, maybe even the Audi R8?


Well, this week, we're exploring the track side of that fantasy, as we're taking a look at the Peugeot RCZ Gr. 3 race car: an RCZ that has its engine behind the cockpit, fed by a bevy of handsome RAM air intakes on both the sides and top of the car that makes the road car a little lacking to look at, to produce well over three times the power of the road car while weighing slightly less, at 516HP (385kW) and 1,200kg (2,646lbs), slightly more of each if the current BoP is applied, and also if you're a fat Asian kid who spent about an hour wrapping his RCZ in carbon only to be denied entry into the lobby. Come on, 5 kilos of wraps should be morally obligated to provide 5 more WHP, aren't they?


As a result of this pubescent transformation, the previously meek French coupé now shares a stage with industry juggernauts, such as Porsche 911s, Ferrari 458s, Lamborghini Huracáns, and of course, the aforementioned Audi R8s. Oh, and, uh... the 4C too I guess. It's... back there somewhere, I think, I guess, maybe? That must've bogged off the line and then launched itself into orbit when it ran over a dry leaf T1. So, the question this week is, should Peugeot have stuck to their mid–mounted guns with the RCZ? Or can the RCZ not control its newfound edginess in a field of adults (and grandpas)?

@Pickle_Rick74 is that... blood, on your car?

The road–going RCZ's driving dynamics never did offer much to write home about, and the maddened mid–engined Gr. 3 monster somehow manages to retain that nondescript handling characteristic that keeps the road car safe. In context of the Gr. 3 car however, I mean that in a good way, as the RCZ offers a no drama, no surprises drive. The turbocharged unit in the RCZ Gr. 3 has enough torque to lug the car out of a corner in a higher gear if the ratios don't match the corner or if fuel is an issue, making for great flexibility in how it can be driven. As for handling, it's a car that's difficult to upset despite being RMR, all without showing any hint of unwillingness into corners. It's just delightfully neutral, and therefore easy to drive. Being a Gr. 3 car built from the ground up for this game, it doesn't have horrifying alignment issues that plague other RMR cars of its category, such as the infamous 458 GT3 and Huracán GT3, and in comparison to the other fictitious MR Gr. 3 cars, the 4C Gr. 3 gets bopped as hard by kerbs as it does BoP, and the NSX Gr. 3 can be quite feisty according to Max Verstappen himself; and who am I to disagree?


I really wanted to run another one of Rob's picks, the 911 RSR, against the RCZ Gr. 3 during race day, not just to see how the RCZ stacks up against a fellow car that has its engine sensibly shifted into the correct position for racing, but also because I think the RSR is the only RMR car with the ease of use to match the RCZ in Gr. 3 currently. The game's network might have had other plans, but the RCZ is a very solid all–rounder all the same regardless.


And it makes me yearn for a road legal, RMR RCZ.
Yes, blood, had an incident on the way to the track....
 
Well,
1) I haven't been here in forever, and
2) I never bothered to take part in the race as tempting as it was.

However - this car was enough to stir something in me and bring me back to say something about it. Beater all the way through! It's just a novelty and can't even be competitive in N100, in comparison to the kei cars that actually have some merit.
 

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