Car of the Week 228: COTY GTS Finale

  • Thread starter Racer283
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I won't be able to make it tomorrow unfortunately due to having a doctor's appointment :( WHY do I always manage to miss the best cars?!

I drove the Trueno AE86 against the Toyota 2000GT a few months back. It didn't have the pace to keep up with its bigger brother even around Tsukuba (and that's even with Eurobeat on 11), but it handled so deliciously and drifts like a dream! This is one of those cars where you can really believe all the hype and hyperbole that comes packaged with it. It's THAT good.
 
A current list of all not yet used cars for COTW:

ABARTH (1)
1500 Biposto Bertone B.A.T 1 1952 (N100)

ALFA ROMEO (3)
4C Launch Edition 2014 (N200)
Giulia TZ2 Carrozzata da Zagato CN.AR750106 1965 (Gr.X)
MiTo 1.4 T Sport 2009 (N200)

Alpine (3)
Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vision Gran Turismo Race Mode (Gr.X)

ASTON MARTIN (5)
DB3S CN.1 1953 (Gr.X)
DB11 2016 (N600)
DP-100 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vantage Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Vulcan 2016 (N800)

AUDI (8)
R8 LMS Audi Team Sport WRT 2015 (Gr.3)
R18 TDI Audi Team Sport Joest 2011 (Gr.1)
R18 TDI Le Mans 2011 (Gr.1)
R18 e-tron 2016 (Gr.1)
Sport quattro S1 Pikes Peak 1987 (Gr.B)
TT Cup 2016 (Gr.4)
TTS Coupe 2014 (N300)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)

BMW (4)
M4 Coupe 2014 (N400)
M4 Safety Car (Gr.X)
M6 GT3 Walkenhorst Motorsport 2016 (Gr.3)
M6 GT3 M Power Livery 2016 (Gr.3)

BUGATTI (3)
Veyron Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Vision Gran Turismo Gr.1 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

CHEVROLET (1)
Corvette Stingray Race Concept (C2) 1959 (Gr.X)

CITROËN (1)
GT by Citroen Gr.4 (Gr.4)

DODGE (9)
Charger SRT Hellcat Safety Car (N700)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Gr.1 (Gr.1)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Racing (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Street (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Technology (Gr.X)
Superbee 1970 (N300)
Viper Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Viper SRT10 Coupe 2006 (N500)
Viper SRT GT3-R 2015 (Gr.3)

FERRARI (5)
250 GT Berlinetta passo corto CN.2521 1961 (N300)
250 GTO CN.3729GT 1962 (Gr.X)
458 Italia 2009 (N600)
458 Italia GT3 2013 (Gr.3)
Dino 246GT 1971 (N200)

FORD (7)
Focus Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
GT 2006 (N600)
GT LM Spec II Test Car (Gr.3)
Mustang Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
Mustang Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Mustang GT Premium Fastback 2015 (N400)
Mustang Mach 1 1971 (N300)

GRAN TURISMO (5)
Amuse S2000 GT1 Turbo (N600)
Chris Holstrom Concepts 1967 Chevy Nova 2013 (N700)
Red Bull X2014 Standard 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2014 Junior 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2019 Competition (Gr.X)

HONDA (4)
NSX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
NSX Gr.4 (Gr.4)
S800 1966 (N100)
Sports Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

HYUNDAI (4)
Genesis Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Genesis Gr.4 (Gr.4)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

INFINITI (1)
Concept Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

JAGUAR (6)
D-Type 1954 (Gr.X)
E-Type Coupe 1961 (N300)
F-Type Gr.4 (Gr.4)
XJ13 1966 (Gr.X)
XJR-9 1988 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo Coupe (Gr.X)

KTM (1)
X-BOW R 2012 (N300)

LAMBORGHINI (6)
Aventador LP700-4 2011 (N700)
Aventador LP750-4 Superveloce 2015 (N800)
Countach LP400 1974 (N400)
Huracan Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Huracan LP610-4 2015 (N600)
Miura P400 Bertone Prototype CN.0706 1967 (N400)

LEXUS (4)
LC500 2017 (N500)
LF-LC GT Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
RC F au Tom's 2016 (Gr.2)
RC F Gr.4 (Gr.4)

MAZDA (8)
Atenza Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
Atenza Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Atenza Sedan XD L Package 2015 (N200)
Demio XD Touring 2015 (N100)
LM55 Vision Gran Turismo Gr.1 (Gr.1)
LM55 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Roadster S 2015 (N100)
RX-Vision GT3 Concept 2020 (Gr.3)

MCLAREN (5)
650S GT3 2015 (Gr.3)
MP4-12c 2010 (N600)
P1 GTR 2016 (Gr.X)
Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo Gr.1 (Gr.1)
Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MERCEDES-BENZ (7)
A45 AMG 4MATIC 2013 (N400)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ (Gr.X)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ Color Variation (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo LH Edition (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo Racing Series (Gr.X)
Sauber C9 1989 (Gr.1)

MINI (2)
Cooper S 2005 (N200)
Clubman Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MITSUBISHI (4)
Lancer Evolution IV GSR 1996 (N300)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Road Car (N500)

NISSAN (10)
Concept 2020 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Fairlady Z Version S 2007 (N300)
GT-R Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
GT-R Motul Autech 2016 (Gr.2)
GT-R Premium Edition 2017 (N600)
GT-R Safety Car (Gr.X)
GT-R Xanavi Nismo (Gr.2)
R92CP 1992 (Gr.1)
Skyline GT-R V-spec (R33) 1997 (N300)
Skyline GT-R V-spec II Nür (R34) 2002 (N300)

PEUGEOT (8)
208 GTI by Peugeot Sport 2014 (N200)
908 HDI FAP Team Peugeot Total 2010 (Gr.1)
RCZ Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
RCZ Gr.4 (Gr.4)
RCZ Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
L500R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.X)
L750R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

PORSCHE (2)
911 GT3 (997) 2008 (N400)
962C 1988 (Gr.1)

RENAULT SPORT (4)
Clio RS 220 EDC Trophy 2015 (N200)
Clio RS 220 EDC Trophy 2016 (N200)
Megane RS Trophy 2011 Safety Car (N300)
R.S.01 GT3 2016 (Gr.3)

SHELBY (1)
Cobra Daytona Coupe 1964 (Gr.X)

SUBARU (6)
BRZ S 2015 (N200)
BRZ Falken Tire/Turn 14 Distribution 2017 (Gr.X)
Impreza Coupe WRX Type R STi Version VI 1999 (N300)
WRX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
WRX Gr.B (Gr.B)
WRX STI Type S 2014 (N300)

TESLA (1)
Model S Signature Performance 2012 (Gr.X)

TOYOTA (14)
86 Gr.4 (Gr.4)
86 Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
86 GRMN 2016 (N200)
86 GT 2015 (N200)
86 GT Limited 2016 (N200)
Crown Athlete G Safety Car (N300)
FT-1 (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
GR Supra Racing Concept (Gr.3)
GR Supra RZ 2020 (N400)
S-FR 2015 (N100)
TS030 Hybrid 2012 (Gr.1)
Tundra TRD Pro 2019 (N400)

VOLKSWAGEN (6)
1200 1966 (N100)
Scirocco Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Golf VII GTI 2014 (N200)
GTI Roadster Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GTI Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Samba Bus Type 2 (T1) 1962 (N100)

@Racer283 Hey mate, I took out the Sprinter Trueno 3door 1600GT APEX (AE86) 1983 (N100) as well, as the majority here seemed to be ok with it? Is that ok? If so, I would like to propose, that you mention it as the COTW as well, as to make it more "official". :)


GTS Nordschleife hot lap STOCK Toyota Sprinter Trueno 3door 1600GT APEX AE86 '83: 08.57.940​



Little, quirky and somewhat drifty Japanese classic. Yep, it's certainly not the fastest, but still fun to throw around.

Driven stock on hard sport tyres without any driving aids, except ABS. First lap in third person view, second one in cockpit view and third one in cinematic replay view. All driven laps are the same lap.

Comparison with Tsukuba rivals:



Verdict: The sleper, of all sleepers?!
 
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My thoughts on the Toyota Corolla Levin:
It's more or less like the Sprinter Trueno, and generally fun to drift with despite not having much power.
*The car in question was given an N200 tune and it certainly does well. I did notice the 4C managed to catch up with it.
On another note: I just love how well modeled this car is, especially with the headlights!
Teku in Tokyo.jpg
 
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The 1968 Fiat 500 is too slow to review. You might as well ask me to review the cornering prowess of a continent, which moves faster than the damn thing. Its top speed rather depends on how much you've had for breakfast, and if you've the headlights on. You could stick your left foot out the door and pedal this thing along the road faster than its engine would carry it, and it'd certainly help with the cramps and circulation problems your right foot will no doubt experience when driving this thing flat out around most circuits. Cyclists could and would go faster in the face of a slight opposing breeze or a gentle incline than this thing could even have dreams about. Hell, I'm even willing to bet I achieve a higher average speed in real life with my Honda Fit than I do with this thing in a virtual racetrack. You'd need to set your camera down for a timelapse shot to get any sort of motion blur when shooting the 500... provided nature doesn't claim your camera before that happens.

Also, yes, THIS happened.

And yet, despite all that, it somehow manages to get itself into trouble in corners despite its nonexistent speed; the front end of this RR car is certainly capable of writing cheques its rear end can't cash, resulting in what has to be documented in the Guinness World Records as the slowest slide in a 4 wheeled automobile. If you've had the far fetched fantasy of increasing the power output of this thing by, say, swapping a Lambo V12 into it, the leaf springs and 4 speed gearbox both have objections that are sure to be sustained. Even when given seven times its original power in our lobby and even the accompanying gearbox tunes, the 500 could barely hold its own against a severely crippled Honda Fit Hybrid. And you thought that was slow.



Is there any saving grace to the Nuova 500 then? Well, it does have to be said that it possesses a remarkably strong body: one that lets a 10 ton tank roll over and jump on it!


In fact, because it has rear seats, it lends itself well to having a pair of 14mm Vulcan Cannons stuck through its rear windows, and because it's RR, there's lots of room up front for ten heat seeking missiles. AND it jumps!

 

The 1968 Fiat 500 is too slow to review. You might as well ask me to review the cornering prowess of a continent, which moves faster than the damn thing. Its top speed rather depends on how much you've had for breakfast, and if you've the headlights on. You could stick your left foot out the door and pedal this thing along the road faster than its engine would carry it, and it'd certainly help with the cramps and circulation problems your right foot will no doubt experience when driving this thing flat out around most circuits. Cyclists could and would go faster in the face of a slight opposing breeze or a gentle incline than this thing could even have dreams about. Hell, I'm even willing to bet I achieve a higher average speed in real life with my Honda Fit than I do with this thing in a virtual racetrack. You'd need to set your camera down for a timelapse shot to get any sort of motion blur when shooting the 500... provided nature doesn't claim your camera before that happens.

Also, yes, THIS happened.

And yet, despite all that, it somehow manages to get itself into trouble in corners despite its nonexistent speed; the front end of this RR car is certainly capable of writing cheques its rear end can't cash, resulting in what has to be documented in the Guinness World Records as the slowest slide in a 4 wheeled automobile. If you've had the far fetched fantasy of increasing the power output of this thing by, say, swapping a Lambo V12 into it, the leaf springs and 4 speed gearbox both have objections that are sure to be sustained. Even when given seven times its original power in our lobby and even the accompanying gearbox tunes, the 500 could barely hold its own against a severely crippled Honda Fit Hybrid. And you thought that was slow.



Is there any saving grace to the Nuova 500 then? Well, it does have to be said that it possesses a remarkably strong body: one that lets a 10 ton tank roll over and jump on it!


In fact, because it has rear seats, it lends itself well to having a pair of 14mm Vulcan Cannons stuck through its rear windows, and because it's RR, there's lots of room up front for ten heat seeking missiles. AND it jumps!


Haha awesome write up!
 

Everywhere else, it's just a nondescript box with a not–too–impressive 127HP pushing along 940 kilos of period–typical parts. Bring it onto a narrow, tightly winding mountain pass however, and this thing seemingly gains a whole new personality, a whole new identity, a whole new life, as though it were possessed by something beyond our world. The whole package comes alive and made me believe all the hype and every hyperbole that has ever been propagated about the car, which is almost entirely unheard of for a car starring in a cult classic show. Move aside, DMC-12s, Firebirds, Countachs, and Supras, because this week, we've got an AE86 to catch if it doesn't suddenly decide to sprout wings mid race.


But what is it exactly that makes an AE86 so legendary? After all, it's not like it's the only car that has a 50:50 weight distribution, FR chassis, lightweight body, and a rev happy engine mated to a stick shift, right? Me personally, I think the car has a lot of character, and that's something you can't really print on a spec sheet or an ad. The car is so willingly, naturally playful, and I'm often sideways before I realise anything's gone awry. The combination of said weight distribution, a lightweight body, communicative steering, and lack of grip means that it doesn't become snappy even with its playfulness, and slides can be held and recovered on whim alone. As Rob's car alludes to, this AE86 is a car that you can steer with the rear and gas pedal as much as you can turn the car with the front tyres, and it acts as if it's the most natural thing in the world whether you choose to steer it from the front, rear, or both.


I'm going to be grossly overusing the "N" word, but whether by design or the most absurd of coincidences, Toyota engineers have put together a package that is so cohesive and natural, I wouldn't want to change a thing about it despite its strong aftermarket support; the car turns—not too much, but enough to put it exactly where you mean to put it, as though it could read your mind. The car goes—but not at a scary pace, just enough to get you to the next corner. The car rolls; but not too much—just enough for you to break grip on the unladen side and let you initiate a slide without touching the handbrake. The brakes stop the car; but not so much where you're at any risk of locking the old, thin tyres in the dry, just enough to get them to smoke and squeal when subject to the aforementioned weight transfer. Everything about the car just feels so intuitive and just... "right", as though you were moving your own hands and feet instead of trying to control an external mechanical being. The ease this car sets my mind as I drive it, letting me not think of a thing and just enjoying the experience, is almost like that of taking a walk in a forest—again, natural, alive, and just so "right".

But of course, this car has been renowned to train its driver, and so it can be as technical and demanding a drive as you want. Usually, cars are either easy or challenging to drive, but the AE86 somehow manages to not only straddle that line between the two, but it excels at both! Try to extract every hundredth of a second from this car, and it will definitely start to judge you silently if you overcook a corner and lose precious, palpable momentum to excessive body roll, excessive yaw, or letting the engine revs dip out of its powerband. The soft suspension asks of the driver to be gradual and gentle, yet decisive in what they ask of the car, as sharp, sudden inputs will upset the softly sprung car, which can also be exploited to a surgical precision if you so choose. It deeply romanticises the process of load transfers and friction circles, dictating a deliberate pace it wants with its driver, and I definitely found myself wishing for a nearly filled cup of water in my centre console during race day just so I would be physically punished for mistreating the car and conditioned to not do so again, given how effortlessly playful it is. It's almost impossible to take a race seriously in this car without stiffening the suspension of the car, like Fujiwara Bunta did when his son was about to race an R32.

The world's biggest gutter, where my driving skills lie.

The more time I spend with the car, the more "happy accidents" I have with it, wherein I overspeed into a corner, panic and have to initiate the rear end to slide out to avoid going face first into a wall, and sometimes, somehow, I find myself taking the corner faster than the lap before when I thought I got the corner right. It dares drivers to go just that little bit faster into a corner, be that little bit more hesitant with the brakes, and more eager on the throttle, because it can and will handle a slight amount of abuse with its tools that allow you the freedom to adjust it several times mid corner to take it in a number of different ways. Most importantly, it richly rewards experimentation and risk taking, which makes for a dangerously addictive combination. The trust that this very, very charismatic car earns in its driver, and how it eggs them on, is something entirely unmatched in all my time driving cars in this game. It somehow manages to make you feel like a movie star with just 95kW when you pull some heroics with the car, intentionally or otherwise. This car is so compelling and charismatic, it feels more than the sum of its mechanical parts, almost as though an emotive, living being. I find myself irreversibly and irresistibly entranced by the charisma and communication of the car. I want to spend more time with it. I feel like I could spend a lifetime with this car and keep finding extra hundredths of a second with it. I feel so compelled to find out more about myself, via finding out more about it, by driving it endlessly. I want to race all sorts of cars and people in it on all sorts of courses and under some of the most uncomfortable conditions, because I feel like this car isn't nearly done teaching me more about both itself and myself. It's... quite simply magical.


While other movie star cars tend to fall apart and unravel the mystique of the shows they starred in the moment they're driven in any sort of realistic scenario, my time in the AE86s has instead made me realise how much of real life experience has been transcribed into Initial D, despite appearing as nothing more than a self–indulgent fantasy at first glance. More than that, it made me believe all the ridiculous tales of how an AE86 could train its driver, how it could be driven in a number of ways according to the situation, and how it could even best some more modern giants like an R32 and an Evo IV. Well, the part where it beats an RX-7 is still a load of horse sh-



-it might actually be possible with the right driver, huh?

So what exactly are the differences between the Levin and Trueno? Well, their names mean "lightning" and "thunderclap", respectively, so you might think that the Levin would be the faster of the two. Both on paper and in practice, however, the two cars are identical as far as I can tell aside from the Levin being 25.4mm (an inch) shorter in length, so the choice between the two comes down to whether you prefer the simplicity, reliability, and gentleness on pedestrians that the fixed headlights of the Levin offer, or being correct, valid, and worthy of love. Both cars are decked out with their optional electronic gauges, which is both cool and a bit of a shame at the same time, as I had hoped that at least one of them would have their traditional gauges to more closely resemble the ones depicted in Initial D. And speaking of, Watanabe Wheels aren't even in the game, so there goes any hope of accurately replicating Fujiwara Takumi's Tofu car. You'd think that that's the first (and for most, only) thing people would want to do to an AE86 both in real life and virtually, but apparently Kaz and PD are too cool for that.


土屋圭市さん 豆号 by yomogimochi-001 livery link
土屋圭市 2021 Helmet and Suit liveries by ABE-SI_660 links.​

So what separates the AE86 from other cars of its period like the S13, Roadster, and MR2? Part of the AE86's charm, I think the clichés of "character", "soul", and how it "speaks" to a driver might regrettably be the most apt at describing; no other car feels as addictively compelling as the AE86 and pushes their drivers like it does, from any time period or any country. As though being the star of a cult classic anime isn't enough on its own, "Drift King" Tsuchiya Keiichi swears by one and still dailies his very unique cross ratio gearbox Trueno, and that I think is the highest praise a car can receive, no exceptions. He is a man whom I idolise, attempt to emulate, and whose opinion I trust as truth as though gospel. Star power like that, there's simply no arguing against. Could another car have taken the AE86's place both in fiction and reality? Perhaps. But I think the totally nondescript look of the 86 really sells a strong narrative. As much as the 86 made the careers of Shigeno Shuichi and Tsuchiya Keiichi, I think in equal parts, those men have made the 86 into the legend that it is today. I don't think it's an exaggeration to say that without those two, we wouldn't have a modern 86 to enjoy today.


In conclusion, anyone who even thinks that they love cars owes it to themselves to try driving a bone stock AE86, either in real life or virtually. Hell, I even want my prospective wife to drive one, because if she doesn't enjoy it, I don't think we'll work out. The AE86 is an ode to going slowly enough to appreciate the small details in life and to remember to enjoy the journey when their off times when they're not trying their best. It is critically endangered proof that we needn't much in life to be happy, as long as everything is done right and balanced beautifully. It is a car that deeply romanticises the naturally mechanical sensations of a car and a drive, and serves as a constant reminder of how hard every component of the car, and indeed our lives, are working for us, and reminds me to be mindful, kind, and thankful for them with that awareness. It is a metaphor materialised for the beauty in a honest, communicative relationship, and the timelessness of love. Every time I drive one, I'm amazed anew at how much fun it is to wring around a tight, uneven track. And most importantly, it makes me smile and laugh every time I drive it.


I am going to be so very, very torn when it comes time to cast my vote for Car of the Year 2021.
 

GTS Nordschleife hot lap STOCK Dodge Super Bee '70: 08.21.829​



The typical American 70's muscle car. Slightly higher top speed compared to the others from that era, which gives it its slight edge lap times wise. A little too snappy and drifty for my taste, but fun nonetheless.

Driven stock on hard sport tyres without any driving aids, except ABS. First lap in third person view, second one in cockpit view and third one in cinematic replay view. All driven laps are the same lap.

Comparison with Nordschleife rivals:



Comparison with Tsukuba rivals:



Verdict: Neutral. It's a 70's American muscle car.
 
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I wish I would have clicked on this thread 3 years earlier.

Bored, 3 days ago at work…with no updates to any of the other threads… I decided to sashay into this one. After starting from the latest posts and working my way back 30 pages. I soon realized I had spent the better part of 3 hours learning the super intricate details that I didn’t think I cared about…. on cars I’ve never given a fraction of a glance at while scrolling through my garage in search of my next Gr.3 or Gr.4 car to race.

The history, the race photos, the videos. All made better by perfect cadence of @XSquareStickIt linguistic wizardry….. only rivaled (and eerily reminiscent) of the first time I read through Stephen King’s magnum opus, The Dark Tower.
 
I wish I would have clicked on this thread 3 years earlier.

Bored, 3 days ago at work…with no updates to any of the other threads… I decided to sashay into this one. After starting from the latest posts and working my way back 30 pages. I soon realized I had spent the better part of 3 hours learning the super intricate details that I didn’t think I cared about…. on cars I’ve never given a fraction of a glance at while scrolling through my garage in search of my next Gr.3 or Gr.4 car to race.

The history, the race photos, the videos. All made better by perfect cadence of @XSquareStickIt linguistic wizardry….. only rivaled (and eerily reminiscent) of the first time I read through Stephen King’s magnum opus, The Dark Tower.
Now that is well deserved high praise. By far the best writer in the group. (No offense to anybody else)
 
I wish I would have clicked on this thread 3 years earlier.

Bored, 3 days ago at work…with no updates to any of the other threads… I decided to sashay into this one. After starting from the latest posts and working my way back 30 pages. I soon realized I had spent the better part of 3 hours learning the super intricate details that I didn’t think I cared about…. on cars I’ve never given a fraction of a glance at while scrolling through my garage in search of my next Gr.3 or Gr.4 car to race.

The history, the race photos, the videos. All made better by perfect cadence of @XSquareStickIt linguistic wizardry….. only rivaled (and eerily reminiscent) of the first time I read through Stephen King’s magnum opus, The Dark Tower.
And that’s the essence of what we do here at COTW, we tell a story about what car is tested every week, giving the unsung hero's the spotlight and testing the established GT Status Quo in a casual and fun environment.

And as you’ll have seen from your 3 hour thread binge, we all have our own ways of doing it. :P

Alex P breaking down the cars performance and comparing it to its nearest rivals, My deep dives down the rabbit hole on a car’s history and any myths surrounding it (Like the RX500’s engine for example.) and everyone’s takes on what makes a car a Beater Or Sleeper.

Square certainly puts more into his writing than most, a perfectionist almost to a fault maybe. 👍

Of Course, If you want to binge read COTW before GT Sport, here’s GT6 COTW for you. ;)

 

As an American muscle car in the early 70s, the Dodge Super Bee isn't a very difficult car to wrap one's head around: soft metallic mounts that can barely be considered "suspension", heavy, bias ply tyres, ABS–less brakes, open diff, big NA V8 up front with abysmal specific power figures and even more horrifying fuel economy numbers, rear wheel drive, and four short forward gears that would pull for exactly 402.3 metres before running out of breath on a straight, level road. So far, so very typical of the beehive that is vintage American muscle then. Been there, done that. Twice.


Far bee it for me to be part of the hive mind who appreciate the sweetness muscle cars, but if the in–game description is to be believed, the Super Bee is supposed to be a performance focused muscle car, which sounds to me as practical as gluing a 10x zoom scope onto a sawn–off shotgun. To this pointy end, the Super Bee that is chosen to represent in this game actually has the smallest engine that was offered for it: a MICROSCOPIC 6.3L Magnum Bee 8 (please don't sue me, Dodge), to create a car that's not just a whopping 191kg (421lbs) lighter than its Challenger R/T sibling, but one that also feels stiffer as a result, all while possessing better balance. So then, could it bee that we have a vintage muscle car that handles well this week?


Well... you'd probably do well to steer well clear of the honey trap of beelieving that the Super Bee will handle well, because it's still a front heavy car on what is ultimately still soft suspension, which means it will exhibit typical muscle car beehaviour if you decide to push it. But while this car is still floaty like a butterfly, it for sure has the proper sting of a bee. In comparison to the aforementioned Challenger, the Super Bee feels markedly more taut and consistent when faced with a slight bend on the road, which makes the typical showboaty, explosive power of American muscle really rather fun to toss around a track, given that it offers you some semblance of control over the chaos. Better being a busy bee trying to correct the car than dying a gruesome death trying to pull your stinger out a sand trap, spilling your innards out in the process.

Yep, look at how much fun I'm having, totally not overcooking T1 on cold tyres and a full tank of fuel after a long practice stint with a horrifically depleting tank!

It'd probably be a lot cooler to see one of these cars in real life, especially in export markets, because of the glimpses in history and culture it brings, the stories that they carry in their aged chassis, and how it might actually help you earn a chance to pollinate someone. In digital form however, it's just a crap car that tops out at an EV–esque 195km/h drag limited, that would just about hold its own against an utter pig of a stock first gen Mitsubishi GTO when given proper gearing, locking diffs, and ABS. As such, I really cannot fathom why in the heck a rational, sane human being would ever find themselves wondering which vintage muscle car to get, and if the Super Bee is any good. But, if, say, you find yourself in a very exacting scenario wherein Arn Anderson has his Glock to your head and is demanding you to choose a vintage muscle car to drive, effectively forcing you to contemplate the age old existential question of, "To Bee or not to Bee", I'd say that the Super Bee can catch many cars of its class and era out by surprise with its (comparatively...) taut handling slightly higher gearing that gives it an undisputed advantage along any track not named "Horse Thief Mile". Me personally though, "not to Bee" is the obvious choice, as I'd take a Camaro Z/28 any day, simply because it's much, much lighter than even the bee, and actually handles well. Well worth the 20k credit price hike over the bee, I feel. Or you know, you could just get a C2 Corvette, which will give you a lot more performance for not that much more money.


Unfortunately, the Super Bee isn't quite the queen bee among its class, let alone my garage. It's therefore a Super Beeter.
 

As an American muscle car in the early 70s, the Dodge Super Bee isn't a very difficult car to wrap one's head around: soft metallic mounts that can barely be considered "suspension", heavy, bias ply tyres, ABS–less brakes, open diff, big NA V8 up front with abysmal specific power figures and even more horrifying fuel economy numbers, rear wheel drive, and four short forward gears that would pull for exactly 402.3 metres before running out of breath on a straight, level road. So far, so very typical of the beehive that is vintage American muscle then. Been there, done that. Twice.


Far bee it for me to be part of the hive mind who appreciate the sweetness muscle cars, but if the in–game description is to be believed, the Super Bee is supposed to be a performance focused muscle car, which sounds to me as practical as gluing a 10x zoom scope onto a sawn–off shotgun. To this pointy end, the Super Bee that is chosen to represent in this game actually has the smallest engine that was offered for it: a MICROSCOPIC 6.3L Magnum Bee 8 (please don't sue me, Dodge), to create a car that's not just a whopping 191kg (421lbs) lighter than its Challenger R/T sibling, but one that also feels stiffer as a result, all while possessing better balance. So then, could it bee that we have a vintage muscle car that handles well this week?


Well... you'd probably do well to steer well clear of the honey trap of beelieving that the Super Bee will handle well, because it's still a front heavy car on what is ultimately still soft suspension, which means it will exhibit typical muscle car beehaviour if you decide to push it. But while this car is still floaty like a butterfly, it for sure has the proper sting of a bee. In comparison to the aforementioned Challenger, the Super Bee feels markedly more taut and consistent when faced with a slight bend on the road, which makes the typical showboaty, explosive power of American muscle really rather fun to toss around a track, given that it offers you some semblance of control over the chaos. Better being a busy bee trying to correct the car than dying a gruesome death trying to pull your stinger out a sand trap, spilling your innards out in the process.

Yep, look at how much fun I'm having, totally not overcooking T1 on cold tyres and a full tank of fuel after a long practice stint with a horrifically depleting tank!

It'd probably be a lot cooler to see one of these cars in real life, especially in export markets, because of the glimpses in history and culture it brings, the stories that they carry in their aged chassis, and how it might actually help you earn a chance to pollinate someone. In digital form however, it's just a crap car that tops out at an EV–esque 195km/h drag limited, that would just about hold its own against an utter pig of a stock first gen Mitsubishi GTO when given proper gearing, locking diffs, and ABS. As such, I really cannot fathom why in the heck a rational, sane human being would ever find themselves wondering which vintage muscle car to get, and if the Super Bee is any good. But, if, say, you find yourself in a very exacting scenario wherein Arn Anderson has his Glock to your head and is demanding you to choose a vintage muscle car to drive, effectively forcing you to contemplate the age old existential question of, "To Bee or not to Bee", I'd say that the Super Bee can catch many cars of its class and era out by surprise with its (comparatively...) taut handling slightly higher gearing that gives it an undisputed advantage along any track not named "Horse Thief Mile". Me personally though, "not to Bee" is the obvious choice, as I'd take a Camaro Z/28 any day, simply because it's much, much lighter than even the bee, and actually handles well. Well worth the 20k credit price hike over the bee, I feel. Or you know, you could just get a C2 Corvette, which will give you a lot more performance for not that much more money.


Unfortunately, the Super Bee isn't quite the queen bee among its class, let alone my garage. It's therefore a Super Beeter.
I love you for beeing so pedantic with the word plays :P

tenor (25).gif
 
Miiiiiiight be in now. What time you guys start?

Looking forward to the rally cars!
It’s been pushed back to tomorrow this week due to GTS having server maintenance at our usual starting time.

Starting time is in the first post. 👍
 
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