Car of the Week 228: COTY GTS Finale

  • Thread starter Racer283
  • 3,110 comments
  • 660,341 views
It’s a similar story with the Gr4 Veryon as it can be lightened to under a ton too. :odd:

To get an idea of the lengths you’d have to go to in order to get a very fast 4wd car under a ton, look at the Lamborghini Sesto Elemento, which has a much smaller 5.2 NA V10 and so much carbon fibre parts.

But even that car weighs at just under 1 ton, 999kgs to be exact.
 
Last edited:
It’s a similar story with the Gr4 Veryon as it can be lightened to under a ton too. :odd:

To get an idea of the lengths you’d have to go to in order to get a very fast 4wd car under a ton, look at the Lamborghini Sesto Elemento, which has a much smaller 5.2 NA V10 and so much carbon fibre parts.

But even that car weighs at just under 1 ton, 999kgs to be exact.
The Sesto Elemento didn’t even have proper seats - you got foam padding attached directly to the carbon fibre chassis.

So yeah, getting a modern Bugatti to under 1 ton probably involves a blood pact with Satan.
 
Alright, show of hands: who didn't even remember that this car is in the game?


I, for one, forgot. The 2013 Mercedes-Benz A 45 AMG 4Matic has a knack for eluding attention, even if taken out of the context of an e–sports focused game that largely ignores German sleepers. It doesn't have flared fenders, bonnet bulges, or fat exhaust pipes that are the rare but typical giveaways of souped up German performance, and even IF they're there, they're so subtle that I can't tell at all. I mean, for gosh's sake, even the "4Matic" in its name just makes it sound like it has a 4 speed automatic gearbox geared towards grandpas driving from the retirement home to their graves during morning peak hour jams, too scared to pass a cooperative cyclist. It simply isn't a shouty car that wants to be noticed. In fact, the only thing that even hints at the enthusiasts' intent underneath would be the utterly ridiculous 19 inch wheels optional on the AMG, an inch up from the standard items. I'm sure there are more giveaways to the trained eye, but by and large, the A45 is so good at making me forget that there's a 355HP (264kW) AWD hatchback lurking in this game that, even if I do remember its existence, it just ends up as background prop to populate a photo featuring another car.

At this point, I might become the GTS' version of SomePlayaDude, and my JCW Countryman is the Cayman GT4.
...if you didn't get that reference, you really ought to check out FH5's COTW thread, which has been pretty great so far.

So, the A45 AMG has got insane performance and a talent for flying under the radar. Sounds exactly like the sort of car we here at Car of the Week are all about, then?


To drive, the A45 AMG shows similar grace to its beautiful interior. Despite packing 50 more HP than the next most powerful hatch, the FK2 Civic Type R, the A45 never sweats putting all its power down to the road at any moment it's asked to in the dry. Of course, it's got AWD which helps to do just that—that's what the "4Matic" in its name stands for and I definitely knew that before writing this review okay?! But, even by AWD standards, the A45 AMG puts down power gracefully and effortlessly like a Mercedes ought to. I never got any inkling of the car struggling, any tyre chirps under power from any corner or anything of the sort, that would signify the car struggling to put down its power. Rather, the car simply understeers vehemently when the throttle pedal is pressed too much, putting all the cards back in your hands by forcing you to lift off that way, making the driver feel like the inept tool in the whole situation while it barely breaks its graceful demeanour. And don't think it puts power down neatly by hiding its 355HP behind a peaky powerband either, as a turbocharged 1,991cc engine having to make 178HP per litre is well entitled to do, because this M133 Inline 4 makes its peak torque of 450Nm (331.9lbf⋅ft) from 2,500rpm, and holds it all the way in a plateau till the power curve overtakes the torque table at 5,252rpm.


As you can probably already piece together by this point, the price to pay for that graceful power and effortless destruction of its hot hatch rivals is in... well, the price tag, yes, but much more so in the corners, I'd argue. The A45 may have 50 more HP to the next hatch in the game, but it's also 175kg (386lbs) heavier as well while costing around 50% more than an FK2 CTR. It is, after all, an understated luxury cruiser instead of a shouty track toy, and nowhere is that more clearly shown than in how soft the suspension setup is, which in my opinion is much more damning on track than its 1,555kg (3,428lbs) mass. It is definitely not a car set up with any sporting intent in mind, with just enough composure to make sure the car doesn't roll or spin out, nothing more. What that translates to in layman terms is "horrible, never ending understeer", which, when further translated into legal speak, means that "if you try to sue Mercedes for an accident in the A45 AMG, know that you don't have a case at all: the car was stable and composed; you clearly went in too fast". This I find is such an oddity, because the only telltale sign of this car's performance I can pick out is the ridiculously large wheels and accompanying low profile tyres barely hugging them, which you would think was intentionally fitted for more precise control and feel for the suspension so that they can work some real magic. On the contrary, the suspension is just... limp. Look, if I'm going to end up with a limp car anyway, can I just have softer, normal sized tyres and wheels and a stiffer suspension instead of the other way around? If you're going to make a car look understated and stealthy, why give it ridiculous looking wheels and puncture prone tyres?


To be fair, the A45 AMG isn't hopelessly terrible in the corners. To borrow a recurring quote from Pickle, the A45 is "still better than the MiTo" in the suspension department. The A45 as a whole doesn't excessively squirm, roll, or seemingly contort and decompose when pushed hard in a corner; it very much keeps its composure. It's just that there's annoyingly enough give in the suspension to take away any and all sense of control and feedback when this big red metal slug is thrown hard into a turn, and there's only a tiny friction circle to work with from the 235mm tyres up front. All that results in is the most frustrating kind of understeer that would kill any hope of a car becoming an enthusiast's pick: the kind you can't do a damn thing about other than to sit on your ARTICO man-made leather seat and wait in excruciating pain while the car slows down enough and regains grip to pull itself out of the sand trap. It has an okay initial turn–in, but at longer, wider corners that make up most paved racetracks, the A45 will struggle, with its unwillingness becoming uncomfortably clear at high speed sweepers such as the Schumacher S of Nürb GP.


Despite the 40:60 torque split and light rear end of the A45 might lead one to believe, the A45 has zero tail happiness to help with that understeer. In fact, it feels like it actively hates that side of itself and fights to hide it from the rest of the world, and it's very successful in that regard. Even in the few off road whoopsies I've had which has broken out the rear end, the car corrects itself almost instantly even when encouraged otherwise with throttle input and steering in the direction of the slide. I'd say the car is idiot proof if idiots can be trusted with a 64,000 Credit, 355HP, 250km/h capable, flame spitting monster.


That said, once you get used to braking early and taking corners slowly, there aren't many hot hatches in the game that can even dream of keeping up with the unbridled power of the Merc. In fact, I think only the GR Yaris can beat the A45 in lap times around Tsukuba, going by Alex's hot lap videos. Combined with its idiot proof handling, understated styling, and that pleasant interior, the A45 AMG is a tool for a comically casual destruction of the hot hatch competition. It is for someone who's had enough of trying, and just wants to win. As much as it's an unsportsmanlike thing to say, I think I'm at the age where I can understand that mentality. Even more frightening than that however, is that I truly think that there's a lot of optimisation that can be done handling wise with just its suspension setup that can unlock even more speed from the Red Slug. I mean, a much older R34 GT-R that is similarly AWD, comparable weight distribution, but with less power, more mass, and even softer suspension does just effortlessly leave the A45 in the dust around Tsukuba. Even though the A45 is a gentlemen's nuke, I think it is more than capable of becoming a genuine sports car if tuned right. Someone just has to take the initiative after being reminded that it exists in the game and told of its untapped potential.

 
A current list of all not yet used cars for COTW:

ALFA ROMEO (1)
Giulia TZ2 Carrozzata da Zagato CN.AR750106 1965 (Gr.X)

Alpine (3)
Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vision Gran Turismo Race Mode (Gr.X)

ASTON MARTIN (4)
DB3S CN.1 1953 (Gr.X)
DB11 2016 (N600)
DP-100 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vantage Gr.4 (Gr.4)

AUDI (7)
R8 LMS Audi Team Sport WRT 2015 (Gr.3)
R18 TDI Audi Team Sport Joest 2011 (Gr.1)
R18 TDI Le Mans 2011 (Gr.1)
R18 e-tron 2016 (Gr.1)
Sport quattro S1 Pikes Peak 1987 (Gr.B)
TTS Coupe 2014 (N300)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)

BMW (4)
M4 Coupe 2014 (N400)
M4 Safety Car (Gr.X)
M6 GT3 Walkenhorst Motorsport 2016 (Gr.3)
M6 GT3 M Power Livery 2016 (Gr.3)

BUGATTI (1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

CHEVROLET (1)
Corvette Stingray Race Concept (C2) 1959 (Gr.X)

DODGE (6)
Charger SRT Hellcat Safety Car (N700)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Racing (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Street (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Technology (Gr.X)
Viper Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Viper SRT GT3-R 2015 (Gr.3)

FERRARI (4)
250 GT Berlinetta passo corto CN.2521 1961 (N300)
250 GTO CN.3729GT 1962 (Gr.X)
458 Italia 2009 (N600)
Dino 246GT 1971 (N200)

FORD (4)
GT LM Spec II Test Car (Gr.3)
Mustang Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Mustang GT Premium Fastback 2015 (N400)
Mustang Mach 1 1971 (N300)

GRAN TURISMO (4)
Amuse S2000 GT1 Turbo (N600)
Red Bull X2014 Standard 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2014 Junior 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2019 Competition (Gr.X)

HONDA (3)
NSX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
NSX Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Sports Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

HYUNDAI (4)
Genesis Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Genesis Gr.4 (Gr.4)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

JAGUAR (6)
D-Type 1954 (Gr.X)
E-Type Coupe 1961 (N300)
F-Type Gr.4 (Gr.4)
XJ13 1966 (Gr.X)
XJR-9 1988 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo Coupe (Gr.X)

LAMBORGHINI (4)
Aventador LP700-4 2011 (N700)
Huracan Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Huracan LP610-4 2015 (N600)
Miura P400 Bertone Prototype CN.0706 1967 (N400)

LEXUS (3)
LC500 2017 (N500)
LF-LC GT Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
RC F Gr.4 (Gr.4)

MAZDA (3)
Atenza Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
Atenza Gr.4 (Gr.4)
LM55 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MCLAREN (3)
650S GT3 2015 (Gr.3)
MP4-12c 2010 (N600)
Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MERCEDES-BENZ (5)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ (Gr.X)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ Color Variation (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo LH Edition (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo Racing Series (Gr.X)

MINI (2)
Cooper S 2005 (N200)
Clubman Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MITSUBISHI (4)
Lancer Evolution IV GSR 1996 (N300)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Road Car (N500)

NISSAN (6)
Concept 2020 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GT-R Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
GT-R Motul Autech 2016 (Gr.2)
GT-R Premium Edition 2017 (N600)
GT-R Safety Car (Gr.X)
GT-R Xanavi Nismo (Gr.2)

PEUGEOT (6)
208 GTI by Peugeot Sport 2014 (N200)
RCZ Gr.4 (Gr.4)
RCZ Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
L500R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.X)
L750R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

PORSCHE (1)
911 GT3 (997) 2008 (N400)

RENAULT SPORT (2)
Megane RS Trophy 2011 Safety Car (N300)
R.S.01 GT3 2016 (Gr.3)

SHELBY (1)
Cobra Daytona Coupe 1964 (Gr.X)

SUBARU (5)
BRZ S 2015 (N200)
BRZ Falken Tire/Turn 14 Distribution 2017 (Gr.X)
WRX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
WRX Gr.B (Gr.B)
WRX STI Type S 2014 (N300)

TESLA (1)
Model S Signature Performance 2012 (Gr.X)

TOYOTA (11)
86 Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
86 GRMN 2016 (N200)
86 GT 2015 (N200)
86 GT Limited 2016 (N200)
Crown Athlete G Safety Car (N300)
FT-1 (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
GR Supra Racing Concept (Gr.3)
GR Supra RZ 2020 (N400)
TS030 Hybrid 2012 (Gr.1)

VOLKSWAGEN (4)
Scirocco Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Golf VII GTI 2014 (N200)
GTI Roadster Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GTI Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
 
This week we are taking a look at a your typical city car. You pry see it in most cities across the US with its sleek sedan look. This week we are taking a look at the Mazda Atenza Sedan XD L Package '15. This weeks car is chosen by @Alex p.

latest
 
Managed an 08.50.357 on the Nords with it, which means it's basically just as fast as a current-gen MX5! :embarrassed: Pro tip: this car is MUCH faster with short shifting. Does not like using the entirety of its gears, like AT ALL. Saved me several seconds on the Nords.

Driven stock on hard sport tyres without any driving aids, except ABS.

Verdict: sleeper?

tenor (15).gif
 
Last edited:
So, who here misses story time with XSquare? No one? Too bad. I've a short IRL story to share regarding this week's car.

20221102_000003.jpg


20221102_000013.jpg


I've owned this TOMICA toy car for a few years now, long enough to forget for how long exactly. The TOMICA Wiki says it was released 2017 November, so there's your benchmark to how long I might've had the car, and how short my memory is.

I've always wanted to recreate this livery in GTS, but I just couldn't be bothered (and because I'm a bit of a perfectionist and it makes me dread actually making a livery). The Atenza being chosen for COTW was the kick in the nuts I needed to finally get the livery done. Can't be too hard, right? I mean, I have the physical car literally in the palm of my hand for me to inspect from any angle, and the design isn't too complicated. I mean, the model itself is barely accurate to the real car, surely I'm allowed some artistic liberties? And so I made this in half a day.

Gran Turismo® 7_20221101235620.png


Gran Turismo® 7_20221101235632.png


Pretty cool, huh?

The name of the car itself according to the TOMICA box is the "Toys "R" Us Original Mazda6 Celebrity Challenge Specification". "Huh, that's a weird name", I thought. "Wonder why it's called that, and if any celebrity actually got into it".

Hoo boy, did they ever. Mazda Australia basically rounded them up like a bunch of kangaroos and plopped them all into race prepped Atenzas and let them loose on each other.



More importantly though, I've come to realise how GROSSLY inaccurate my livery is. I now hate myself and want to die from all the shame. Way more than usual.

Moral of the story: Google whatever the heck it is you're making BEFORE you make it!
 
So, who here misses story time with XSquare? No one? Too bad. I've a short IRL story to share regarding this week's car.

View attachment 1205078

View attachment 1205079

I've owned this TOMICA toy car for a few years now, long enough to forget for how long exactly. The TOMICA Wiki says it was released 2017 November, so there's your benchmark to how long I might've had the car, and how short my memory is.

I've always wanted to recreate this livery in GTS, but I just couldn't be bothered (and because I'm a bit of a perfectionist and it makes me dread actually making a livery). The Atenza being chosen for COTW was the kick in the nuts I needed to finally get the livery done. Can't be too hard, right? I mean, I have the physical car literally in the palm of my hand for me to inspect from any angle, and the design isn't too complicated. I mean, the model itself is barely accurate to the real car, surely I'm allowed some artistic liberties? And so I made this in half a day.

View attachment 1205080

View attachment 1205081

Pretty cool, huh?

The name of the car itself according to the TOMICA box is the "Toys "R" Us Original Mazda6 Celebrity Challenge Specification". "Huh, that's a weird name", I thought. "Wonder why it's called that, and if any celebrity actually got into it".

Hoo boy, did they ever. Mazda Australia basically rounded them up like a bunch of kangaroos and plopped them all into race prepped Atenzas and let them loose on each other.



More importantly though, I've come to realise how GROSSLY inaccurate my livery is. I now hate myself and want to die from all the shame. Way more than usual.

Moral of the story: Google whatever the heck it is you're making BEFORE you make it!

Pretty cool actually.

tenor (28).gif
 
Ah yes, the Atenza Diesel, the first car I ended up winning a nitrous kit for on GT7. :P

Ended up going full tilt on the build even though this was early in GT7’s life where money was slightly harder to come by. :yuck:

400hp, 434 ft-lbs of torque(over 660 ft-lbs with the low rpm turbo. :drool:) and 4WD to put it to use.

As previously mentioned, it’s not one for those who can’t short shift(Sorry Baron :lol:)
as it’s power goes off a cliff at high rpms.

My tuned Atenza can rev to 7000rpm which is pretty nutty for a Diesel, but it makes peak power at 5300rpm(down to 4300 on the low rpm turbo.).

Just like how square was motivated by this weeks pick to get his livery done, it gave me a good reason to dig the Atenza outta mothballs and freshen up the settings after many PP & physics tweaking updates. :)

Rick knows from when RXGT was doing early testing on GT7 that the Atenza was quite the rival to his Celica and was just a menace in general. :sly:
 
Well, I am not a fan of diesel cars. I had a couple when I lived in England, and while I was pleasantly surprised by my 306 turbo diesel peugeot, it still had that rattle and low rpm shift point. But it was admitantly pretty quick. My Citroën AX diesel on the other hand... that car was everything I hated about diesel cars. It stank, it was noisy, it was slooow, and it looked absolutely hideous.
At least this Mazda looks good, and the ballance is pretty okay. Could really handle better with some tweaking to the awd. I thought it was fwd... I despise having to shift early, but have discovered that it is not just the diesels in this game that you have to do this with(gr3 Supra comes to mind).
I had a couple okay races in it on tracks I am fast on, but was not super impressed. It went well around Miyabi, but I just love that track, soo...
Verdict: Crap, but still better than the Mito.
 
"Oh boy here it comes!", you're probably thinking. "XSquare is here to white knight a slow ass boring Mazda saying how we don't understand its appeal, citing some inane trivia, and then sharing some of his boring IRL experiences with the car while simping some Japanese girl who owns one before calling it the best car in the entire series of Gran Turismo, past, present, and future. Why do I have to scroll through this guy's crap to get to a valid opinion?"


広島カープ赤ヘル応援タクシー by XSquareStickIt livery link (GTS | GT7)

...except, no, not really. The Atenza is slow, boring, and completely useless in the e–sports centric title of Gran Turismo Sport, easily being the slowest N200 car in the game, stock or tuned. I have not come into contact with one IRL, nor do I know of any attractive Japanese woman that owns one. In–game, if you just want the experience or novelty of driving a diesel road car, the Mazda Demio is much lighter, maneuverable, cheaper, and has a manual. For nearly 40,000 Credits, you might as well just save up for a WRX STi, a much lighter and powerful sedan. At the end of the day, it's a car Alex picked, what did you expect?


But, the "but" changeover point comes very quickly in this review, almost as quickly as the Atenza revs from idle to its peak torque rpm of just 2,000rpm, because I think in this context, being boring is a compliment. To first lay out all the cards on the table, the Atenza is a full size premium(ish) sedan that makes only 172HP from a soulless, filthy diesel engine while weighing in at a whopping 1,600kg (3,527lbs), an uncomfortable 63% of which rests over the front axle. That it can even manage to be boring at all instead of being comically catastrophic to drive on a racetrack is in itself a feat worthy of praise, I think.


In fact, the sheer neutrality of this thing on a racetrack would shame some cars whose marketing departments would like you to believe are sporty. Slam on the brakes and chuck this gorgeous lump into a corner, and there is none of that protesting, hands in the air surrender understeer that plagues even some supercars we've tested here in Car of the Week—at least, not initially. The Atenza mostly complies with any reasonable request made of it, and it will hook up and bite apexes no problem with the right driving techniques. Of course, it's not invincible, but the beauty of how the Atenza handles is in how it lets go: slowly, steadily, and with plenty of buildup and warning, communicating with the driver every step of the way and giving them plenty of outs before the car completely lets go. That's usually praise reserved for some of the best sports cars ever made, like the 86 and Roadster. In similar vein to those acclaimed sports cars, the soft suspension and slow acceleration of the Atenza combine to become a valuable tool to teach a beginner driver about weight transfer and the value of momentum, but unlike your typical RWD sports cars, the Atenza won't bite at all if you get something wrong, making it an ideal car to start learning about driving fast in.


So, what's a 172HP AWD inert lump like once it does let go? To be honest, I can't much tell you, because the Atenza is so difficult to upset and lets go so slowly and with so much buildup, you'd have to be a proper Muppet on a road trip to meet your local friendly Barry R. to get the Atenza to bite back. The only time I've gotten into trouble with it is at Paddock Hill of Brand's Hatch, where the softly sprung car is already severely off balance being trail braked, only to have the road suddenly fall away from the car. That was the only instance in the whole night that I've looped the Atenza around, and that only happened because the car was so stable everywhere else, Paddock Hill was truly a freak exception that caught me by surprise. Oh, and it was wearing Sport Hard tyres way too grippy for its stock suspension on race day, subjecting the car to way more gs than intended, and Paddock Hill was the only corner the car gave up at. For reference, the car comes default with Comfort Medium tyres in GT7, two whole compounds less grippy than the Sport Hard tyres GTS defaults most production cars to.


Being a high end XD Grade, the 40,000 Credits Mazda asks of you for the privilege of owning their flagship sedan notably nets you Mazda's invaluable Active Driving Display, a pop–up glass panel atop the dashboard onto which the most important tidbits of information when driving, such as the car's speed and nav directions, are projected. It's a feature I genuinely wish were on every modern car. On the motorsports side of things, you get paddle shifters and AWD too, the former of which carries over to the Atenza Gr.3 Road Car, making it the fastest accelerating and fastest shifting homologation car in the game, while the optional AWD saves Mazda the indignity of having its sole representative of Gr.4 be FF, as the Atenza Gr.4 is similarly AWD, though the pros and cons of having AWD in this game is a whole 'nother warehouse of worms best opened another day.


Overall, the Atenza is a very composed, neutral, predictable, and communicative car to toss around a racetrack. It won't belt out a soulful orchestra, nor will it kick out its rear end playfully, and yes, it's a little soft and awfully slow for track use, all of which means it's a very sedate experience even when put through its paces. But that's more than okay, more than fine, it's great; not everyone wants to stand out or be the centre of attention. Some petrolheads know what they have and is content to quietly enjoy it instead of having to shout it out to their neighbours with pops and bangs. Oh and if you think it has absolutely zero performance credentials to boast about, it does casually outrun a 1.5L ND Roadster around most tracks if both cars are wearing the same tyre compounds. That I think is precisely what it means to be a modern Mazda: completely unambiguous to everyone else, but always worth hustling for the one behind the wheel, and the package of such opposites I find is such an incredible feat, especially considering that the Atenza can be had with an auto or manual, a gasoline or diesel engine, a sedan or wagon body style, FF or AWD, or any combination of the above (in Japan, anyway...). I think it's criminally easy to overlook how important and enthusiastic Mazda's presence in the automotive industry is today, and every time I get in one, I'm just pleasantly surprised. And you know what? If this is the worst Alex can do, I think we're going to be okay for a while.


...until we finally transition into GT7, that is. But Alex is NEVER getting to pick a Car of the Week come GT7. MUUHAHAHA!
 
Last edited:
First time poster here -

So, what to say about the Atenza… As somebody who plays GT for 2 reasons; Car History and high speed thrills, the Atenza seems to tick neither of those boxes. It is a wonder why it was added in the first place…

The Atenza is a stable-ish build with relatively little tuning capability. It is a pretty low car, with a top speed of 124mph at stock and doesn’t really have too many tricks. Let’s just say it’s not a fun car to drive.

However, the Atenza has one of the best looks I’ve seen from a Mazda in this game. It looks simply stunning in Mazda’s trademark red. So much so, I still haven’t put a custom livery on it! And I probably won’t considering how little I’ll use it in future….

Needless to say, on track it’s a bit of a slowpoke. It’s one of the slowest cars in the N200 category and only has 172 horsepower at stock, with a useless turbo in the middle.

In my incapable hands, it managed a pretty dismal 9.24 at the Nordschleife, with me only having one real moment (thanks in part to its stability). Shifting mid way through the bar is recommended.

Its also pretty crap at drifting, clocking up 2,912 points at Tsukuba, as well as a time of 4 minutes flat at Fishermans Ranch.

Despite it’s incredible styling, the Atenza is a **** car, no two ways about it.

Beater. Simple

(Hope you enjoyed my first post!)
 
First time poster here -

So, what to say about the Atenza… As somebody who plays GT for 2 reasons; Car History and high speed thrills, the Atenza seems to tick neither of those boxes. It is a wonder why it was added in the first place…

The Atenza is a stable-ish build with relatively little tuning capability. It is a pretty low car, with a top speed of 124mph at stock and doesn’t really have too many tricks. Let’s just say it’s not a fun car to drive.

However, the Atenza has one of the best looks I’ve seen from a Mazda in this game. It looks simply stunning in Mazda’s trademark red. So much so, I still haven’t put a custom livery on it! And I probably won’t considering how little I’ll use it in future….

Needless to say, on track it’s a bit of a slowpoke. It’s one of the slowest cars in the N200 category and only has 172 horsepower at stock, with a useless turbo in the middle.

In my incapable hands, it managed a pretty dismal 9.24 at the Nordschleife, with me only having one real moment (thanks in part to its stability). Shifting mid way through the bar is recommended.

Its also pretty crap at drifting, clocking up 2,912 points at Tsukuba, as well as a time of 4 minutes flat at Fishermans Ranch.

Despite it’s incredible styling, the Atenza is a **** car, no two ways about it.

Beater. Simple

(Hope you enjoyed my first post!)
Welcome. Good entry. :)
 
Thank you so much! I would like to say good car choice but….
Welcome to the thread! :cheers:

A big part of the fun here is that we get to drive cars in the game we normally wouldn't have much reason to pick up. A lot of times they end up being awful and deservedly forgotten, like almost every VGT for example, and Pickle Rick's favourite MiTo, but the Atenza was a pretty pleasant surprise for myself personally.

Alex is on a personal mission to subject us all to the slowest cars in the game. You were lucky you weren't here when he picked the Sambabus or 500F :yuck:
 
Welcome to the thread! :cheers:

A big part of the fun here is that we get to drive cars in the game we normally wouldn't have much reason to pick up. A lot of times they end up being awful and deservedly forgotten, like almost every VGT for example, and Pickle Rick's favourite MiTo, but the Atenza was a pretty pleasant surprise for myself personally.

Alex is on a personal mission to subject us all to the slowest cars in the game. You were lucky you weren't here when he picked the Sambabus or 500F :yuck:
Doubly so as me being a clown in the lobby made us all have to run the Sambabus around Route X.
 
Alex is on a personal mission to subject us all to the slowest cars in the game. You were lucky you weren't here when he picked the Sambabus or 500F :yuck:
I can't remember if I've said this before, but be grateful Alex wasn't with us for GT6!!

The Honda Z Act will always go down as the slowest car EVER in a GT game. It's not the least powerful, but the gears were so ridiculously long that the acceleration was 0-60 in.... well we're still trying. We'll get back to you on that one.

 
I'm quite surprised this car has multiple variants of it, a few being race-spec'd models and a road car. This Atenza in particular feels like a car I'd take for cruise. Besides that, it has a nice exterior to boot. Could be a sleeper(?), although the Toyota Crown would be a better choice.
 
I do want to point out, as previously mentioned by Vic, that the Atenza has more torque than some trim levels of the Ford F-150 with a whopping 300+ ft-lbs. Vic was able to get 660 ft-lbs with a low turbo in GT7, meaning that the Atenza can have more torque than all factory trims of the F-150.

Horsepower it may not have, but it can certainly haul rear bumper where other cars might not.
 
This week we are taking a look at the last race car in the Lamborghini line up. Like the Gr.3 Huracan, it is a homologation of the Huracan supercar to fit into the specs of a Gr.4 race group in GTS. This car takes inspiration from it's real life car in the IMSA Motorsport Series. This week we are taking a look at the Lamborghini Huracan Gr.4. This weeks car is chosen by @Baron Blitz Red

1200
 
This week we are taking a look at the last race car in the Lamborghini line up. Like the Gr.3 Huracan, it is a homologation of the Huracan supercar to fit into the specs of a Gr.4 race group in GTS. This car takes inspiration from it's real life car in the IMSA Motorsport Series. This week we are taking a look at the Lamborghini Huracan Gr.4. This weeks car is chosen by @Baron Blitz Red

1200
Definitely a sleeper. It's the meta for the Gr.4 class more often than not, at least in a "top of the leaderboard" way.
 
Back