Car of the Week 228: COTY GTS Finale

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This week we are taking a look at the last race car in the Lamborghini line up. Like the Gr.3 Huracan, it is a homologation of the Huracan supercar to fit into the specs of a Gr.4 race group in GTS. This car takes inspiration from it's real life car in the IMSA Motorsport Series. This week we are taking a look at the Lamborghini Huracan Gr.4. This weeks car is chosen by @Baron Blitz Red

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Never drive it before, but I cannot STAND the Gr3 variant, so hopefully it’s not like that
 
Never drive it before, but I cannot STAND the Gr3 variant, so hopefully it’s not like that
I agree insofar, that it is pretty wild, but I still quite liked it. One of the most impressive laps I managed I feel. I think it was a 06.30.8xx on RH tyres on the Nords obviously.

But let's get back to the Gr. 4 variant:

Managed a 07.00.550 on the Nords stock on RH tyres with it. (Yes it's annoying me I didn't get it under the magical 7 minute mark :P). Very pleasent drive. The 13th fastest Gr.4 car of all 28/29 Gr.4 cars, so more on the faster side? Pretty good I think.

Verdict: Neutral-good? Slight sleeper?
 
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What is the secret behind speed on a racetrack? Is it assuring and trustworthy stability a driver can easily get used to and come to rely on? Or is it a loose, easy to maneuver car that can dance around opponents, and occasionally its own driver? If you were to pose that question to Lamborghini, I have a feeling their answer will be "yes", while presenting to you on one hand, the rock solid Huracán Gr.4, and on the other, the utterly diabolical Huracán GT3 '15.


The annoying conundrum here is that they're both wickedly fast in their respective categories, being mainstays on time attack leaderboards and podium finishes alike, all while being polar opposites in how they drive. Neither sibling requires an introduction, but the Huracán Gr.4 under the spotlight this week is the rock solid, stable Lambo of the two, one that most of us here at Car of the Week are already intimately familiar with, as my peers and I already have hundreds, if not thousands of kilometres on the odometers of our Huracán Gr.4s on race day. As you may have already surmised by now, familarity with the Huracán Gr.4 is a necessity, and mileage on the cars is a rite of passage, because for the longest time, it was an "auto win" car in Gr.4, and anyone not driving one in a Gr.4 race was just willfully running at a disadvantage—a huge one at that. So much so in fact, that even someone like me, who openly despises most Italian cars we've tested here in COTW, and who also happens to be artistically impaired, even designed a custom livery for my Huracán Gr.4!


To understand how a 1,365kg (3,009lbs) car with a detuned 404HP (301kW) can be such a menace, it's important to understand the category in which it resides: Gr.4. Gr.4 is, in the most polite manner of speaking as I can muster, an unadulterated, unabridged flustercuck of chaos and imbalance. That's just the reality of smashing together an FF hatchback Mégane, an FR 86 with weightless steering, and an AWD 5 speed Lan Evo all into the same category. It's precisely in this goop of barely regulated diversity that the Huracán flourishes, being blessed with the absolute best parts permissible within the slack Gr.4 regulations: a responsive and linear Naturally Aspirated 5.2L V10 engine slung aft the cockpit, sending power through a close ratio 7 speed sequential gearbox to all four wheels, wrapped up in a svelte, low cg, low drag package. At a glance, the Huracán simply has no weakness, no area in which it compromises, and thus one can only hope for tyre wear or Balance of Performance to rein in the Huracán if they end up racing one in something else.


Good luck waiting on either of those though. While most AWD cars chew through their front tyres with the hunger of a malnourished, rabid dog, the prizefighter raging bull has a much more balanced appetite, having a 42:58 weight distribution and a colon tangling 30:70 torque split, both of which largely rear biased to ensure that the front tyres last the whole course. Of course, AWD cars have a strong appetite not just for tyres, but for fuel as well. To this end, the Huracán retains the use of a 7 speed gearbox like its road going counterpart, which is one more gear than the vast majority of its peers in Gr.4, making it one of the very few cars arbitrarily blessed with an almost literal leg up in a category consisting of 6 speed NSXes and Corvettes. Not that the NA V10 was picky with revs to begin with—it has enough torque to lug from mid range no problem—but the seven speed box just means that the Huracán can save fuel by short shifting without sacrificing nearly as much speed as its NA compatriots.


Okay, how about we try outrunning the conservative car for track position then? Well, if the track is wet, forget it—the Huracán is easily the fastest and easiest Gr.4 car to drive in the wet, combining AWD stability and a rear midship agility without the mass and understeer of the Veyron, and guess what? Those are the only two rear mid engined, all wheel drive cars in Gr.4. In the dry? The featherweight and responsive front end will trace a neat line to the apex of any corner like only a rear mid engined car can with barely a hint of understeer, the sort that you as a driver subconsciously compensate for without even realising it, which is to say that you'll only note the understeer when jumping into or from something truly sublime. As you might expect from a car with understeer, the rear end of the Huracán Gr.4 never threatens any shenanigans on corner entry or exits. Power delivery? Don't even have to think about it—just gun it out of the corner; the AWD will hook you up almost literally, and the V10 engine has enough low end torque to lug from the mid range. When to upshift? Just rev it out, it's a NA V10. Downforce? Not enough to change the way you drive even in the slipstream of others. Kerbs? Don't feel them. It's such a rock solid and consistent drive in any situation, I almost want to say it's brain dead easy.


So what is it, then? If it's not its lack of longevity, not its handling, then surely the weakness of a Huracán lies in how it's been balanced by Balance of Performance, right? It HAS to be massively slow in the straights to compensate for its brilliant handling and superb longevity à la the 86 and Cayman, right? Surely no car without a Ferrari badge can be so blatantly favoured in a sanctioned racing category, right? Well, what better way to find out than to bring said Ferrari? You know what they say: Ima beat a fothermucker with another fothermucker! Or something!


Similarly Italian with its naturally aspirated rear mid mounted engine hooked up to a 7 speed box, Ferrari's elegant and svelte 458 Gr.4 trades brashness and AWD for a more elegant design and the aforementioned truly sublime turn–in, but can the Ferrari sashay its red buttock ahead of the raging bull when the cheque-

Yeah I'm not even going to bother finishing that sentence. No way in HELL can the 458 compete with the Huracán. I just wish I knew that prior race day! The Ferrari has actually been bopped to compensate for its razor sharp handling and stellar longevity, resulting in it losing out on both power and mass to the Huracán with BoP applied, and not even by just a little bit, either! Yes, the 2 wheel drive car has less power and more mass than the AWD car when raced in the same category. Why? Hell if I know, ask PD! The result of all this shenanigans is that the 458 barely gains at all in the slipstream of the Huracán, and can't hold off the raging bulls' charges even in the corners despite having a sharper front end. It was such an abysmal matchup that I couldn't even beat Baron's beached Bolognese bull to the line at Big Willow coming out of the final turn on the last lap! The Huracán is so disgustingly quick, it makes a Ferrari of all things look ethical!


So... Huracán perfect car, then? Why did I say that the Huracán "was" an auto–win car? Well, the Huracán fell out of favour because the type of races we have in Sport Mode changed; wear rates were exaggerated and pit loss times were elongated, shifting the tides and funneling drivers into the most fuel and tyre efficient car, the Mégane Trophy. That, plus the fact that PD suddenly decided to comically boost the power and drop the mass of FF cars in Gr.4 to be completely untouchable in races that didn't have any wear enabled (i.e. Daily Race B). Due to these extreme circumstances, Gr.4 races began to revolve around one trick ponies that performed their one trick better than any other steed in the stable, and it was just a matter of selecting which one trick the race demanded. Due to the Huracán not being the best in any single area, it just feels lost and purposeless for the first time in its life, a sad reflection of its category more than an indication of the car's capabilities. Make no mistake though—as a complete package, I argue that there isn't a single car in Gr.4 that can even come close to fantasising about being as good as the Huracán, and if I could only drive one Gr.4 car for the rest of the game's life, I would pick it. If dynamic and unpredictable weather ever becomes more prominent in Gran Turismo 7's Sport Mode races, there may well be a resurgence in hurricane warnings around every track the Huracán finds itself at.

 
Ahhh…the Huracan, one of the most beautiful cars in the world. Period. I was waiting patiently for an excuse to use this car after I had obtained it a few weeks ago on a Daily Workout. However, I was nervous it would be as horrifyingly bad as its mad cousin the Huracan Gr3, one of the worst Gr3 cars in the game. As I took it around the Nordschleife on a warmup lap, I was pleasantly surprised at the stability and warmth I received from the Lambo. By my shoddy standards, a lap time of 7:42:001 wasn’t too bad, and a 10 minute race around Monza turned out to be a pleasant surprise, even with the BOP on. Sure, the straight line speed can lack a bit, but I cannot express to you my feelings about the Gr3 variant. It looks stunning in the Black livery I was provided with, and it makes for a prefect car for photography. So, is this a beater or a sleeper?

For me, most people could be afraid to try this car if they have previously tried its Gr3 cousin before, but those who do venture into the unknown are rewarded with a frisky yet fun drive. It can have a couple moments around high-speed corners, but thats to be expected.

Overall, the Huracan Gr4 is the definition of a sleeper, a car that is understated and underrated.

(Also, is there a thread we can place our nominations for next weeks car)
 
Ahhh finally the DB11! Managed a 07.25.728 on the Nords stock on SH tyres with it. Quite floaty and indirect. Very impressive nonetheless, considering its weight. Especially on Tsukuba it's SUCH an overachiever. Again, considering its weight, it should do really bad there, but actually, it was ASTONOSHINGLY quick there. Lovely beast.

Nordschleife rivals:


Tsukuba rivals:



Verdict: Certified sleeper!
 
Well this car just blew me away. I loved driving this beast. On the sports hard tires it was an absolute drift machine, turn in on the brakes and you can just carry a drift through to the exit. Also great for smoke shows.
I don't think there is a lot I can say about the grip level of the rear of this car that hasn't already been said about a well greased brick. I found it fairly easy to control drifts in this bad boy based solely on the fact that I knew the rear was not going to stick, at all, anywhere. The front end had fairly impressive grip and precise feel for such a softly sprung grand tourer.
The interior of mine was a bit loud color wise, and difficult to see out of in first person view. Lucky for me I usually drive from the roof of the car so this was a non issue.
Overall I would have to say this is one of my favorite picks since I joined a couple years ago. I just loved the fact that you can maintain a decent pace while being a complete hooligan.
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The car is beautiful from almost every angle and next to the Camaro just looks low, wide and almost classy.
Great fun race at Suzuka where I pushed just past the fun envelope and into the spin cycle.



Final verdict: sleeper, so good I almost forgot to mention how crap the Mito is.
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If pony cars and pickup trucks are cultural icons of the Americas that don't appeal or make sense to anyone else in the world, then I argue that the Grand Tourer is Europe's similarly wasteful and unwieldy counterpart. After all, what the heck am I supposed to do with a 1,770kg (3,902lbs) turbo V12 2 door coupé that not only has a longer wheelbase, but also weighs more than most four door sedans? Drive from Singapore to Russia with it? We have planes for that sort of nonsense.


DB11 AMR Edition by mshow1215 livery link (GTS)​

I sure as hell am not taking it anywhere near a racetrack; with springs softer than muah chee without even the peanut sprinkles, the Aston Martin DB11 is similarly difficult to keep in shape on a racetrack. Wrangling the heavy, floppy car under some semblance of control feels like trying to grasp thick, wet and slippery noodles, and the car feeds back to the driver just about the same feedback, precision, and confidence as disposable chopsticks. I never really know how the car will react any time I turn the wheel or depress a pedal, and it struggles in equal measure with both oversteer and understeer. It's the sort of car that you have to drive with the next three or even four corners ahead in mind and set the car up accordingly even before they come into view, as the DB11 will lean as desperately as I'm leaning into my Asian heritage in this review if treated with any sudden or rough input. There is zero sophistication in how the DB11 tackles corners, so much so that it seems like corners tackle it rather than the other way around. It will kick up a fuss at unassuming, unnamed kinks in the road that are unnamed because they aren't corners in any other car, like the uphill left hander before Suzuka's Degner turns, where the DB11 is liable to kick its rear end out on an upshift from its lightning quick, but also rambunctiously rough ZF 8 speed gearbox. In short, I simply could not find any point to mentally relax on any track I took the DB11 to, because it seemingly finds ways to make mountains out of molehills and hairpins out of kinks. The driving experience of the DB11 on track is like materialising anxiety attacks, distilling them, and then sticking four wheels onto it and then calling it art.


Thing is, it's really hard to say if it's a good GT car or not, as we have so little in the game. It could be a really great handling GT car relative to its competition not in the game for all I know, and the DB11 for sure has some redeeming qualities to make a case for itself: It looks indisputably stunning for something of its size. The balance of the chassis is really nice when I'm not too busy freaking the hell out at trying to keep the car from spearing off into Australia. The turbo V12 has a very usable tabletop torque curve, and the gearbox is pretty quick. It comes in many colours, interior and exterior. Still, I really do wish it had a sport mode that at the very least stiffened the suspension to non–trecherous levels at speed, because as it stands right now, a V8 Vantage will more than harass it on twistier tracks, and a 2017 NSX will match it blow for blow on most balanced tracks despite the Honda carrying more mass with less power. Mind you, neither of those are out and out track toys in their own right. The NSX in particular I wrote a scathing review for because I found it too heavy, soft, and inconsistent, yet it felt like a racecar when ran alongside the DB11. The Vantage proves that Aston understands enthusiasts and can make cars that are properly exciting to push, and so it's doubly disappointing as someone who genuinely lusts after the Vantage to feel almost none of that spunk and eagerness inherited by the DB11, a flagship car ushering in a new era for Aston Martin.


If it's going to weigh as much as a plane and be just as cushy, costly, and uninteresting, I'm just going to take a plane. Those can go faster faster than the DB11's claimed top speed of 192mph (309km/h).
 
Tesla has been innovative for all electric cars that are in current production. With no engine a Tesla can get up to speed pretty quick with its all electric motor. Now a days Tesla's all come with dash cams which can help you determine who was at fault for an accident. This week lets take it to the course and see how it performs in our races. This weeks car is the Tesla Model S Signature Performance '12. This weeks car is chosen by @coyb20

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Managed an 08.07.686 on the Nords stock on SH tyres with it. Yeah it's heavy, but considering its power, its lap time is really dissapointing. The acceleratrion isn't too bad but that top speed...Also it's pretty unstable, especially under braking.

Nordschleife rivals:


Tsukuba rivals:


Verdict: Beater.
 
"Back, Back, Left.....a little more left, back, back, back, STRAIGHT BACK, 3 MORE FEET...... HHHWHUUUUUUUUUUUUUP!!!"



Red lights glare, as Jose's 40' Big Tex quickly comes to a halt. I briskly walk up the port side of the trailer, White's Boots clogging, as Jose was easing his brand new dually into park.

"Nice truck man", I say ahead of me, admiring his midnight black F-550 that was still has paper plates; while taking notice of the United States Marine Corps sticker that's flanked by a Mexican flag - a trade mark of every single one of the many cars Jose has owned in my 18 years of knowing him.

Approaching the driver's side door, I see the familiar bald head, bright blue eyes and beaming smile of my mentor, and one of the gnarliest men I know; looking back at me as I walk up to his door.


"Private Pile! How the **** are you!?". This has been Jose's standard greeting of me for the past 15 years. I would like to say it was the standard greeting for the entire 18 years I've known him, but that would be assuming that he even spoke to me, let alone acknowledge my presence, for the first 36 months we worked together. I considered him damn near ancient when I met him at 22 years of age. But to be fair, when you're 22, anyone over the age of 40 might as well be from the Paleolithic era.

"Jose, how's retirement treating you, Sir?"

"Looks like its treating me better than you! You just get off the line?" he asks looking me up and down, taking notice of my faded, ash-stained brush jacket and equally filthy BDO's.

"Yeah, been over in Arizona for 3 weeks. Our last operational period ended today... day 21 actually, so they had to give me today off. When I found out last night that one of the DC-10's was headed here for repairs, I hitched a ride. I think we're going to be headed back out at 18:30 or something. How's the farm? How's the family?"

"Family is good, my oldest ended up taking the Bar Exam in Nashville. - Turns out she was serious about moving to Tennessee."

"Oh damn, how you and Maria doing?"

"We're good. Mom's taking it kind of hard. I keep reminding her that our other two kids are still at home, but still... she doesn't want to let any of them go - she's just being a mother hen, that one".

"And the farm?"

"Ah the farms, yes. Yeah, they're all good."

"Farms?" I ask quizzically.

"Yes, three of them now, actually. I have my hobby farm in Sylmar as you know - just pigs, goats, a couple horses... and my garden. But I actually was able to purchase back the farm I grew up on in Mexico. And I just bought about 50 acres near Frazier Park, which is where I'm headed after this."

"Frazier Park? What the hell are you going to do with land in Frazier?"

"I dunno.... it backs up to the Tejon Ranch, so I'll probably use it as a base camp to hunt from - It came set-up for cattle - I can have a heard of probably- I dunno.....about 75 on the ranch if I want....then' they can graze in the forest during the spring and summer; per the open range agreement, of course. But I can't be there all the time, and I'm not sure if I want to build a bunk house and hire a crew to manage it for me. Really depends if Maria is willing to finally get out of real estate or not - I've been bugging her to retire for a year now, but, you know....women". Jose says while shrugging at the last part.

"Yes, yes I do".

"Hey Andy, where's the head in this hanger? I haven't been to this base in 40 years, I don't recognize anything!!"

"Its just past that C-130", motioning to my right. "Just across from the mess hall".

"Thanks Pile, I'll be back in a few".




As Jose walks off to the facilities, I gather some heavy-duty ratchets from Joser's tool box, lower the tailgate of the trailer and put the ramps in place. After I secure the second ramp, I high step it onto to the trailer and clip a turnbuckle onto a cleat, mid ship on the starboard side. Fastening the collar, I get up out of a crouch and walk over to the next cleat befo--

"I thought you were at work?"

I almost jump out of my ****i*g boots at the sudden and unexpected inquisition; not to mention the nearly emotionless tone of her voice.

"...at least, that's what you told me earlier this week. That video you sent me last night of you guys - 'firing back' is it?"

"'Back-firing, and also 'firing out.' Two different terms that apply to two different operations. Although, they do sound the same, I reckon."

Even though I was telling her the truth - admittedly, I was also trying to confuse her. Not only did she scare the crap out of me, which was clear to every organism within a 5 mile radius that heard me scream. But more importantly, she already had the upper hand in this conversation that was merely 10 seconds old.

"Whatever. I don't really care what it's called to be honest. All you're doing is adding to the destruction from the looks of it."

"Back-firing is a really good tactic to fight fires with, not to mention that periodic fires are actually good for the enviorm--"

"Were you even actually at work? For all I know you could have had one of your colleagues send you that video to use as an alibi to blow us off." She seemed to be looking right through my eyes and into my should as she said that - Reading me, like a poker player. Looking for my 'tell'.

"Esther." I cock my head to the right and slightly lower my chin. "Look at me."

She does.

For someone as detail oriented as her, I found it interesting that she seemingly just glazed over my appearance, and probably smell...

That is, unless, I always look and smell like a hobo. Which very well might be the case. Either way...




"Look at what I'm wearing. I just got off the line two hours ago, literally. One of our DC-10's needed repairs. Edwards was the closest base that had the parts, so I hitched a ride. Gonna' load up some cars in the trailer and go to Willow for some quick test sessions. I gotta be back on the line by 0700 tomorrow morning."

"You do smell like hell. Worse than normal actually." Esther uncrosses her arms and rests her right hand on her messenger's bag that's slung over her shoulder. "What was wrong with the plane?".


She actually seemed somewhat curious, or she was just testing the depth of my story. Either way, I didn't care. I had been on the line for 21 days straight and had reached the point of delirium about 5 days ago. Plus, we were wasting time and I had A LOT to take care of, and only 18 hours and 23 minutes left to do it.


"Check engine light." I say flatly, with little emotion. Mostly because I was tired - but mainly because I'd decided I was going to start messing with her.

"Airplanes have check engine lights?". Esther recrosses her arms.

"More or less...well, actually-" I tilt my head sightly to the right and upwards, as if further contemplating. "-it's more more than less, if I'm being honest."

I look back at Esther, to see that she's not the least bit amused. I could have told her that it was a fueling issue that was causing the left engine to cut out when banking right, but I was tired. Besides, I had some questions of my own.

"The real question E, is-"

"E??"

"yeah, like I said...E, what are you doing here? This is a military base. And not only are you a civilian, you're not American either. The only people whom house personal planes here are very high-end celebrities; and military celebrities", MY light bulb upstairs started to flicker, dimly.

"Pssshh, Americans and their worship of the military and war heroes. I'll never understand it." Esther finishes the sentence with her patented eye roll.

"Yeah, I can see why you feel that way. But don't worry, we'll have your guy's back next time."


Esther didn't seem in the mood to prod anymore, and I wasn't in the mood to give a history lesson. Not to mention, I wasn't exactly convinced that she grew up and went to school in Singapore.

"What kind of celebrities have hangers here?" Esther asks.

"Well, on the military side, probably the most acclaimed is Captain Pete Mitchell. As far as civilians go; there's a few businessmen, a couple Hollywood actor types. But they usually keep a low profile, I'm to--"

--- "Hey Andrew!" a young-ish service man shouts as he trots up to me, clipboard in hand. "

"Yes?" looking away from Esther as Ryan approaches to my right.


"Just to confirm.." he taps his pencil on his clipboard, as if checking the accuracy of his notes; "You want the 458, 935, Bentley, the Nissan and both 488's on the plane. ----- Leaving the Sauber, 787 and the Nissan to be loaded when you get back? Sound bout' right?"

"Yessir."







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"......Wait, what?? We don't even use half of those cars he just named in the GTS series. What the he*l are you up to Andrew?"

"Yeah, we should probably have a chat sooner than later about some thin--"

"Private...Ryan was it?" Esther abruptly interjects.

"Its, actually Master Sergeant Lombardo ma'a--"

"Whatever. Look, Sergeant Lombardo--"

"Yes." Ryan says quickly, clearly not caring for Esther's stolid tone, but staying professional nonetheless.

"Like I was saying, Sergeant. Where exactly are you taking these cars?"

Ryan looks over to me, seeking conformation of my approval. I ponder it for a second, look across to Ryan, then to my left over to Esther. Then, with a ruffled brow - followed by a slight left head nod in Esther's direction, insinuating to go on. Ryan proceeds; thick New Jersey accent and all.

"First we're going to drop off cargo in Japan for a week. Then from there we're flying to South Africa; 'Ky-a-l-ami, is it Andrew?'" I nod, confirming.

"Yea, then from there we're off to Bahrain for 36 hours-"

"Its going to be 72 hours now," - I interject - "just got word from Mr. Casual that we're picking up 2 more cars while we're there."

"Right." Lombardo takes out his #2 pencil and makes the correction.
"Ok, right... so 72 hours in Bahrain. Then....say, Andrew? Are we still going to Spain? You weren't too sure about that one when we made the itenierary."

"Negative. We cancelled that track day."

"Ok, no Spain." Ryan makes a correction with his pencil again and continues.
"Then we're going to the UK for a week."

"At least a week." I say, seemingly staring off into space, across the three-hundred-yard-long hangar. My god am I tired.

"Right, so a week-ish in the --"

"Where are you guys going in the UK?" Esther was looking at Ryan as she said this, but the question was directed at me.

"I'm going to Brands, Donington, Oulton Park, and Silverstone. Sergeant Lombardo is going to Italy to visit his family."

Ryan was looking down, smiling to himself and beaming at the idea of seeing his grandmother and grandfather - both in their 90's mind you - as well as his cousins. None of which he's seen since March of 2018. Or was it 2017 he said? Meh, doesn't matter. I'm exhausted, running out of time, and I'm just about done with Esther's prodding.

"Yea, and then from there, myself and a few others will be transporting about a dozen cars up to Germany to a warehouse about 25 clicks east of the Ring'. Ryan is going to pick us up in Munich after he's visited his family and we've delivered the cars. Then we'll be headed back here, to Edwards."





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"So that'll be a total of 2 weeks that you'll be in the UK and Germany, Andrew? I...I don't think I'm approved for 2 weeks of leave, Sir." Ryan inquires.

"I took care of it, Captain Conway already approved it. He owed me a favor."

"Thanks Yard"

"Don't mention it." I say with a slight shrug.

"What the hell are you doing with cars we don't even use, on tracks that we don't even run on, Andrew??". Esther was visibly perturbed with all of this, and was now seemingly laser-focused on getting to the bottom of it.

"Well, that's not entirely accurate E"

"Stop calling me that"

"Whatever." It was my turn to be curt now. "Like I was saying, that's not entirely accurate, ESTHER. COTW has access to the 458, the 787, the RCP-92, and the C9." counting each of the four cars out on my fingers as I rattled them off.

"Yeah, we don't have access to a lot of the tracks you mentioned"

"Well, there's that", not disagreeing with her.

"What the hell are you doing with all of these cars at all of these tracks ANDREW??" Esther said, emphasizing my name in a similar mocking fashion that I had enlisted 45 seconds prior.

"Like I said, we should probably have ourselves a palaver about that. Sooner than later mind you."


I could tell this answer didn't do much of anything in the way of delivering the answer in which she was inquiring, but honestly, I could care less. I haven't slept in 36 hours, or had a decent night's rest in 3 weeks


"Say, where exactly are you headed Esther?"

Esther still laser focused on getting to the bottom of my riddle, withdrew ever so slightly - as if it was now her turn to start a defensive operation by means of misdirection. But before Esther had but 2 seconds to begin painting a white lie of her own, Lombardo chimed in studiously, and right on queue--

"She's headed to Montana, Sir."

You could tell Esther wanted to shoot Ryan a dirty look, but she now maintained a softer lock on the eyes, seemingly coming up with a method to explain away her own covert operation.

"Uhmmm...yeah, Montana. For a work retreat."

"Montana? Work retreat??" A smirk begins to manifest across my face.
"Esther in Montana? Amongst mountains, cattle, and cowboys?" I was now laughing. "Do you even know where Montana is? Besides, I'm sure they'll be expecting their first snow soon."

"Of course I know where Montana is, Andrew."
"Yea?"
"Yeah...approximately 2 hours and 20 minutes from here, weather permitting of course."

"Of course."


I turn to my left as I hear the echo of a door closing in the distance - the sound perfectly magnified by the vastness of this military hangar. In the distance I can see Jose casually, yet purposely walking in our direction with a lumbering gait that is very out of place on a military man, on a military base; but more akin to someone who's earned every penny of his life, by swinging the preverbal hammer - both literally and figuratively. Medium-sized fortune be damned.

Whatever It is, It's the walk of a man who has done a lot, seen even more, and now finds himself on the precipice of old age.
For old age is god's gift to pause...and reflect; about what's been done, and what's been left undone.




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Turning my head back to Esther, "Look, I gotta run. I should be back in Singapore in a month or so, we can catch up then."

"back in Singapore?"
"Yea"
"Ok?" Esther visibly looked confused by my last comment.
"Have a safe flight. And beware of the Cowboys. You might despise them, but we tend to be charming." I say the last line with a sly smile.
"Thanks. I'll be fine. Have a safe flight as well."
"Ma'am". I tip my imaginary hat with a smirk, and about-face, walking back towards Jose's truck.



Pacing back to the truck, Ryan hands me his clipboard with the page turned to the inventory list (minus the 787, Sauber and Nissan). I quickly scribble my signature, hand it back and give a head toss in Jose's direction, as he's sitting on Big Tex and looks like he has something to say, which I already know what it is.

"Hey Pile, you have 3 cars that need to get to Willow, and I only have room for 2 on my trailer. What's the plan?"

I look at Ryan. "Hey, I know you guys have plenty of JP4 on the base, ya'll by chance have any avgas you can spare?"
"Sure, how much?"

I look over to the Nissan, consider that it probably hadn't been driven in 5 years, and winterized as a precautionary measure. "About 25 gallons should do me fine.'
"Absolutely, I'll radio to control to have a mobile fuel cart brought over."

I look back at Joser, who's hands are resting on his knees, studiously waiting for direction; "We'll drive it."
"Seriously? A race car on Rosamond Boulevard?"
"Yup. Say Joser?"
"Yea?"
"Can I drive your new truck and you drive the Nissan?" I press my hand against the bed of his truck, leaning up against it.
"First off, Pile. Get your iDck-beaters off my truck."
I smile. "Well?" motioning over to the R92CP when my head.
"No one besides me drives my truck, Pile"

I laugh, bending at the waist as I do so. "Not even Sergeant Lombardo?" gesturing over to Ryan with my thumb.
"Especially him. The Air Force is filled with a bunch of ****ies that are too scared to leave their air conditioned bases and cockpits!"

We all get a good laugh from this, before heading in our respective directions - Joser to his truck, Ryan to his office; and myself, to an awaiting rocket ship.

"Hey Ryan!?"
"Yea?" as he looks back at me.
"Any clue where Esther is going?"
"Some private airfield I think."
"A private airfield that can land and take off a 747?"
"That's what I hear, yeah."
"Who is this guy?"
"Never met him myself, personally. He actually doesn't even come around here much. I just know we get a steady influx of entrepreneur types flying to and from his ranch, and across seas sometimes."
"Anyone ever see him?"
"Yea, a pilot who used to be stationed here, Dave I believe his name was - 'yeah, Dave....he's stationed at Mugu now' - anyways, he used to talk to him sometimes. Dave's a car guy too, ya' know. Had a Mustang that he'd go track at Willow Springs on his days off. I guess this Montana guy... 'Kahaserian' or something like that, he's a car guy too. Matter fact', he has a few in his hangar behind his plane right now".
"Oh yeah, what kind?"
"I dunno, Asian cars I wot."
"'Kahaserian', you say? What is he, Persian?"
"To be honest, I'm not sure. Dave used to say this guy was always wearing expensive suits, mostly silk." Ryan says with a slight shrug of the shoulders.
"Bit of a stereotype."
"Yeah."
"But you're probably right."
"Yeah."



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Inside of one of Mr. 'Kahaserian' hangars at Edwards. I'm told he has a few





"HEY PILE! LETS GO! I DON'T HAVE ALL DAMN DAY!"

"Roger. Sorry Joser."
"Later' Ryan."
"See you in a few Andrew."










The Nissan R92CP





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--------------------------





The original plan was to take Yeager Street out of EAFB, hang a left on Rosamond, continue on for 22 miles to 75th, then right at 75th and into the front gates of Willow - A quick low profile jaunt through the desert, necessitated by the fact that I was driving a race car down public roads, and we were without an escort. However, a brief scan through Map Quest, informed us that there was an accident involving a Semi on Rosamond at the dry lake; some sort of white gold people were talking about in the comments section. Instead, we were forced to take the long way around, by means of the 58 to Mojave, then onto the 14 southbound, exiting at Rosamond and heading west. Essentially turning a 30 minute ride into an hour long trip - and probably longer as I figured we'd bypass the 14 and cut through the windmills, being that the 14 is a favorite amongst CHiPs. To be honest though, I couldn't have cared less. It was a beautiful and bright morning, I was back in the driver's seat of a race car after 3 weeks of swinging a tool, and the R92CP was running like absolute dog s**t. At first, I was convinced that lone culprit wasn't Father Time, nor automotive stagnation, but yours truly.

When Mr. Casual and myself purchased 10 of these in early March, we sent two of them out to museums on loan, a car out to one of Mr. Casual's private garages in Stavelot, 6 were to be shipped around the world to various locations for private rental, and I kept one in California. Besides the six R92's that were going to remain in consistent active rotation, I was in charge of winterizing the other four, which I did meticuously at my garage in San Diego, spending no less than 20 hours on each - bringing each car back up to factory specs, before draining the fluids, applying generous amounts of lube in areas prone to corrosion and calcification, then finally backing off the torque on components that were subject to extremely tight tolerances. Judging by the way this car was seemingly puking, and sputtering like a poorly jetted KX500 at every rotation of the crank, I surmised that I might have forgot to fog the motor, drain the fuel lines, replace the spark plugs; or any combination thereof.

....On fourth thought, I might have forgotten to re-torque the valves after having backed them off for hibernation. Actually, that was most likely the culprit, as the symptoms of a lean-running engine still persisted long after the freshly pumped avgas would have flashed and flushed any sediment out the tailpipe. As my brain slowly started to come on the boost from 1 Redbull already down the hatch, with #2 currently chasing, I replayed my winterzation process for each car, and realized that none of the aforementioned had occured. This is just.... how race cars from 30 years ago ran when they were going anything but full-tilt. Sure, race cars of the 90's were long passed the era of true natural aspiration by way of carburators, nor was fuel injection by any means new technology. But rather, 3 dimensional ECU mapping was very much in its infancy in the late eighties through the mid 90's. And 3D mapping was very much a 'black magic' that only a few of the top factory teams had begun to explore.

As the 14 freeway approached, I texted Jose to hold at McDonalds in Mojave and I'll lead the rest of the way in. Two minutes later, just passed Farlin Street - 2 cups of coffee, all of the first Redbull, as well as half of the second, required immediate attention.



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NGL, it took quite a bit of coaxing to get the turtle out of his shell. IT WAS COLD!!!



There's something magical about the desert. Even in the less scenic parts, such as the town of Mojave, there's distinct beauty to behold for those whom tend to look further than skin deep. Making a left from Backus onto Tehachapi Willow Springs Road, I couldn't help but to keep sneaking glances at the snow-capped Tehachapi mountains to my right. Yes, I know I said I was just at a fire, which is true. But I never did say where. The same storm from Alaska that brought an early first snow to the Southern Sierra's, wreaked absolute havoc for us in Cibecue. Most deserts in the world exist because of mountain ranges, and I was just happy to enjoy the smell and crispness of a freshly watered creosote, on the western edge of the great Mohaine desert.






////////////




If you were a kid born in the 80's and liked cars, most likely your room was adorned with posters of exotic cars (with even more exotic women sprawled across the hood) like Lamborghini Countache's, Ferrari Testarossa's and Acura NSX's being standard fap-fare. But EVERY GEAR HEAD IN EXISTENCE remembers the first car that made them pause on that random magazine page and stare. For me that car was the Nissan R92CP, stanced' next to a 92' Nissan pickup in an advertisement in Dirt Bike Magazine. The ad was something like "We at Nissan build champions", or something like that. Back then, I was into anything and everything that had to do with sports. Football, baseball, motorsports, it didn't matter. While my brother and sister were watching cartoons, I could usually be found by myself in the room Eric and myself shared, flipping through pages of Sports Illustrated, Dirt Bike Magazine, and Motocross Action, while having ESPN or the speed channel playing in the background. To be honest, the first time I saw the R92, I just thought it was a cool looking race car that was sponsored by Pepsi. I mean, the colors were more or less the same. Not to mention, I had recently partook in the "Pepsi Challenge" with my brother the week prior, when we both had scrounged up enough change between us to walk down to the corner store and see what all the fuss was about. But something about the look of that car grabbed me, and would hold my attention for literal minutes on end.


Although I might be a tad biased, given my age and the generation I grew up in, I think that 80's leading into the early 90's were the absolute epitome of motorsports. And not just Circuit Racing cars, but all of motorsport really - and its many, many forms it takes on. The Kawasaki KX 500 was setting motocross tracks, Baja, and Desert racing across the western united states on fire. Dakar was in its heyday and still not using GPS, The Camel Trophy was just as brutal as Dakar, F1 and Senna, the DTM series, Group B madness, and the brutality of the aforementioned Group C cars. What makes this era so special in my opinion, was that technology and innovation were growing by leaps and bounds every year, yet all of these vehicles were still very much analogue in nature. Sure, paddle shifters and its associated gadgetry were starting to make an apperance in F1 as the 90's approached. But the rest of the automotive racing world didn't catch on until 1993, when Group C was dismantled in favor of Le Mans Prototypes. Many people will say that the technological arms race between McLaren and Williams in the 80's and 90's, along with the dissolving of Group C - is what finally kicked motorsports, and by extension, automobiles into the post-modern era. And to be fair, they're probably right. But ask any misty-eyed racer who's on either side of a half-century in age what race car they would love to take for a hot-stint around Spa - and it won't be Hamilton's McLaren from 2007. It'll be Senna's MP4/4. It'll be a screaming 787B. A Ferrari F-40LM. A McLaren F1-GTR. A Porsche 956. A Sauber C9. A 89' BMW M3. It'll be a driver's car, free of any electronic wizardy. Just two turntables and a microphone.




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The amount of detail that goes into these scapes is amazing. All the mountains in the background are extremely accurate in size and shape. Fun Fact!!! I grew up just on the other side of them!!



Many of the older race tracks that are still in use, have been forced to undergo major changes throughout the years in order to facilitate the ever changing landscape of the FIA, as well as the needs of latest generation of race cars. The fact that Willow Springs Raceway has remained relevant, despite never having really hosted any major races or series since its opening in 1953, is nothing short of astounding. Just as astonishing, is that the layout hasn't changed in just as long, yet still remains very raceable in everything from a 65' Shelby Cobra to a Toyota TS050, with neither car feeling out of place. Big Willow is a race track that is rife in deception. If you reset your trip meter as you cross the start/finish line, you'll find that only 2.5 miles have eclipsed by the time you circulate back around. Willow Springs is a track that feels much bigger, no doubt aided by the expansive landscape that surrounds the 600 acre property. In just 4023 meters, this track manages to squeeze in two 180+mph straights, decreasing radius turns, double apex corners, sweepers with speeds that can be in excess of 160 miles per hour, and a treacherous plateau section that will give you an incredible view of the desert floor as you understeer off the tarmac on your way up, or way back down.



Despite only writing sparingly about Willow Springs in previous reviews, its actually a track that I've turned 1000's of laps at over the years. Be it as a development test driver for Ferrari, McLaren, Hyundai, Toyota or Subaru - to prestigious race series such as the FIA Nations and Constructors Cups. One-off smaller series like the PC2 Sprint Series; or just straight up hooning my own personal collection of Beaters and Sleepers. Willow is a track that I will forever hold sacred. Not to mention my parents live no more than an hour's drive due East up in the mountains. And my mom makes the best chicken pot pie that you'll ever taste!



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Style points not-withheld, the only work a modern LMP1 car can do better than a Group C monster, is when the speeds get below 60mph, and the course starts to curve consecutively in opposite directions. Its then that you realize that if there's one aspect that modern race cars have grown by leaps and bounds over the past 30 years, its aerodynamics and chassis geometry. For every 150 yards worth of chicanes on a race track, an R92CP will need an extra 1/4 mile on a straight to disproportionately make up the ground it lost to its modern counterpart. I mean, the only reason they broke up the straights at Le Mans, was because Group C cars were getting too fast.*

After spending the better part of the afternoon switching off between the Sauber, 787 and R92 to obtain the necessary baseline testing and data acquisitions ..... not to mention spending a good 45 minutes trying to teach Joser how to use a smart phone to take stills. Followed by another 120 minutes getting him acquainted with a drone for some of the more active shots, Jose and myself high-tailed it back to Edwards to load the cars bound for Japan, and I needed to hitch a ride on a hobbled DC-10 back to Arizona. I hope RBF will clear us for landing in Big Bear Lake, cause' I have a hunch we ain't gonna make it very far.












The rest of this review will be finished up at a date TBD
 
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Where to start with this one.. well, it has brakes, I mean it REALLY has brakes, the "car" feels heavy when you hit them but the sheer stopping force is something to behold. That was a surprise to me for sure, what was also a surprise was the lack of power, my friend has a dual motor model 3 and holy crap that thing goes like spit off a shovel.
So we won't talk too much about the motor, it makes no rewarding noises at all, hits a brick wall at 215kph and almost saves itself with gobs of tire shredding torque. Almost, but not quite.
It feels really heavy around the corners, with sharp turn in oversteer if you are late comming off of the brakes, neutral through the mid corner, and if you don't light up the tires, understeer on power.
Having said all of that, we had some really fun races in it tonight and put it up against a few other cars that almost all stomped it. I wanted to hate it, but I only disliked it. If it made and noise other than the sound of the tires crying enough, maybe, just maybe I would have enjoyed it more.
Verdict: I had fun in it, but Beater for sure. Still better than the Mito by a long shot.
The fact that I was beaten savagely by a pace car and a diesel Mazda says it all.
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You ready for a hot take? Here it is: I'm indifferent towards the Tesla Model S.


ワタナベコーヒー by XSquareStickIt livery link (GTS | GT7)
Tesla Mobile Service by LuckyStrikeID livery link (GTS)​

Tesla cars are things you either love or hate, what with the stereotypes of a typical Tesla owner, stereotypes of anti–EV petrolheads, the shenanigans of the company's CEO, the list goes on. Simply put, there are a plethora of reasons to form an opinion about this week's car even before driving one. Me personally, I think I've exhausted my list of complaints regarding EVs in my horrendous Taycan "review", and so as someone who's at his wit's end being woken up by pops and bangs at 4 in the morning from a fart can Golf in his neighbourhood and on the verge of sticking the piping hot exhaust up the owner's rectum and vigorously popping both, even someone like me looks forward to a future when cars can't make noise anymore, or snap my neck in a jam like my DCT equipped Fit Hybrid.


Cayman GT4 entry cost aside, what I like about the Tesla Model S Signature Performance P85 is just how unassuming it is; no crazy doors, no fake ICE noises, no gearboxes, nothing of the sort. It's just a car. It does car things. It just happens to be electric. As a result, it feels a lot more consistent to drive than the Taycan, and we needn't mention the i3 beyond dismissing it in one sentence. More than just fine however, the way a Model S drives even made me go, "wow!" a few times, despite me experiencing it solely in a game that flawlessly distills away any sense of speed from the player. That is to say: the Model S is more than just a one trick pony, and it shows in the corners of all places where EVs usually tend to fall apart in comparison to ICE cars.


The first thing that will grab your attention almost literally are the brakes on this thing: they each are deserving of their own verified checkmark, and not the piddling 8 dollar variant, either; they'll bring the Model S to a halt in distances I'm sure will put many legendary 90s sports cars to shame. "But how can that be in a car weighing over two tonnes on the same Sport Hard tyres GTS slaps on every production car?", you may be asking at this point. Quite frankly, I don't have an answer for that. The Sport Hard tyres on the Model S feel nothing like the Sport Hard tyres on every other car I've tested here in Car of the Week; they feel more like Sport Softs, with damn near racing slick levels of grip, and I kept going back to double check on my setting screen to make sure I wasn't going insane on race day. Combine the ravenous brakes, black magic tyres, and suitably stiff 1.6Hz springs, and the end result is a car that never feels its 2,018kg (4,449lbs) kerb mass. If I had to make a guess purely from the driving sensations behind the wheel and never had a chance to actually look at the spec sheet, I'd guess this thing was 1.6 tonnes (3,527lbs) at most.


Being of a middling P85 grade, the Model S is technically an RR car, if we have to force ICE definitions onto it. Only the rear wheels are driven, and the tiny motors that directly drive each wheel sit behind the centreline of the rear wheels, still entirely within the subframe. Don't let that turn you away from trying to drive one however, because it's the batteries that weigh the most in an EV as opposed to the motor, and so the implications of the motor's location isn't as massive as the engine's location in an ICE car. Case in point, the RR P85 has the same weight distribution of a front engined GT3 racing car, at 48:52 front to rear. Now, of course, with its peak torque of 600.2Nm (442.7lbf⋅ft) driving only the rear wheels from near idle, it should come as no surprise that the Model S will kick out its rear end on corner exits, and you will need to pay it extra mind to keep its rear end in check coming out of a corner absent the sound of an engine revving disproportionately quickly, which I didn't even realise I had come to rely on so much until I hyperlooped my Model S around during Race 1 at Tsukuba. This is definitely a car you'll want to drive with headphones or earpieces on, just so you can hear every little tiny chirp of the rear tyres, as they're the only warnings you get from the car that it's about to break loose absent real world sensations or a semi decent steering feedback simulation in the Gran Turismo series.


Even more terrifying than its tail happiness on corner exits however, is the Model S' tail happiness on corner entry, where it will snap and spin faster than even an air–cooled 911 if you attempt to give it any steering angle while on the brakes. I theorise that this is where the omission of typical drivetrain parts, such as a locking differential, hurts the Model S, because the Model S is just disproportionately nervous under braking for the grip and balance that it has, as if the individual electric motors can't figure out how aggressively to regen brake, especially relative to each other, causing such snappy behaviour on trail braking. Again, I can't say for sure—I'm only guessing here, because the only thing I know for sure is that a car with this much grip, springs this stiff, and such a balanced chassis cannot possibly be this awful on the brakes unless some wizardry has gone wrong. Regardless of the cause, that near uncontainable rear snappiness makes corners with deep apexes, like Turn 1 of Tsukuba, very precarious to tackle, as you'll have to fight the car from wanting to spin out in the long, arduous tiptoe journey to the apex of the turn. I find that I'm forced to under utilise the front tyres' grip to keep the rear end in check, which is as backwards, counterintuitive and disappointing as thinking with your ass rather than your head. That, or firing staff of a newly bought company, only to beg them to come back when you realise you're in way over your head. Pick whichever analogy works for you; they're in no way related.


If (or more accurately, when) the car does begin to slide, either from corner entry or exit, the Model S quickly becomes the single most playful and manageable thing to drift I've ever slid in this game, bar none, making it such an instrument of hoonage. While cars like the AE86 and Cayman GT4CS allow me to half grip and half slip my way through a corner with just a hint of yaw angle, the Model S is the only car in the game I feel allows me to not only initiate a full on sideways smoking slide, but also hold, adjust, and retain it for long periods of time without spitting me out from whence I came! Not even Yoshihara Dai's D1GP BRZ is this easy to drift! Again, the tyres on the Model S just feel different from anything else in the game, and I think it's bloody beautiful and I want to try fitting them on any other ICE car. This arcade racer "driftability" means that you can carry some mind bending speeds into tighter corners, such as the last corner of Laguna Seca for example, simply because the car is mostly already rotated when it hits the apex, meaning that it can unleash all of its 422HP (314kW) that much sooner. And in case you were worrying about that overeager slide sending you into a kerbside sausage and launching your Tesla into Mars, fret not; kerbs almost don't register through the car at all. I don't know how they've managed to set the car up to be stiff and responsive, yet soft and compliant on the racetrack! You can mount and molest sausage kerbs in this thing all day, any day, from Laguna Seca to Red Bull Ring; the car simply wafts right over them. Simply put, this is a car that will almost make you drift and cut corners and look like a flamboyant jackass whether you mean to or not.


With its strong, sustained acceleration, surprising cornering ability, and even just some real life stuff like having two boots and a flat rear legroom, the Tesla Model S makes a lot of sense on paper. Unfortunately, my heart doesn't follow my head as usual, and I can't find myself liking or loving the Model S. A lot of that is due to its tail happiness on corner entry, and how I always feel like I had to under drive the car to save myself and it from itself, like I have to baby it constantly, and it's just tiring. Might just be me being a dinosaur and not having sampled many EVs yet, but nonetheless, the Model S is not a car that ever enticed me to dance at the limit with. It's not a car that I ever feel like I really got to know as a result. It might not be saying much about the car itself, if not for the fact that a bone stock WRX STi, a cheaper, underpowered, manual gearbox saddled, much more stable, similarly compliant and plush AWD car, gave me that communication, trust, and enticed me to bring it to its limits more where my peers died in their Model Ses, all while I set the fastest lap of the race in my WRX at Bathurst. At this point, I don't even know if it's my head or heart that's saying "no" to the Model S anymore. All I know is, I'm indifferent towards it. It won't get a Car of the Year vote from me, but if we had a Sleeper or Surprise of the Year award? The Tesla Model S would get my vote for being that damn good when it had no right whatsoever to be.

 
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...AND SPEAKING OF AWARDS, Racer has entrusted me with handling this year's COTW awards! With the month of November drawing to a close, we only have 5 more victims left for 2022, so those 5 upcoming cars, along with everything from Week 167's LM55 Gr.1 to this week's Model S, will be eligible for the following awards:

  • Best Looking Car
  • Worst Looking Car
  • Most American Car
  • Sky High Roller's Award

and of course, the two biggest ones being...

  • Beater of the Year
  • Car of the Year

If you want to vote for any of the above categories, simply shoot me a DM here on GTPlanet. May the best (and worst) cars win!
 
...AND SPEAKING OF AWARDS, Racer has entrusted me with handling this year's COTW awards! With the month of November drawing to a close, we only have 5 more victims left for 2022, so those 5 upcoming cars, along with everything from Week 167's LM55 Gr.1 to this week's Model S, will be eligible for the following awards:

  • Best Looking Car
  • Worst Looking Car
  • Most American Car
  • Sky High Roller's Award

and of course, the two biggest ones being...

  • Beater of the Year
  • Car of the Year

If you want to vote for any of the above categories, simply shoot me a DM here on GTPlanet. May the best (and worst) cars win!
IMPORTANT notice regarding the following list: I did remove the 3 following safety cars: 1. Dodge Hell Cat, 2. Renault Megane, 3. Toyota Athlete, because we did test already their non-safety car counterparts, which are the exact same cars, just without the lights.

A current list of all not yet used cars for COTW:


ALFA ROMEO (1)
Giulia TZ2 Carrozzata da Zagato CN.AR750106 1965 (Gr.X)

Alpine (3)
Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vision Gran Turismo Race Mode (Gr.X)

ASTON MARTIN (3)
DB3S CN.1 1953 (Gr.X)
DP-100 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
Vantage Gr.4 (Gr.4)

AUDI (7)
R8 LMS Audi Team Sport WRT 2015 (Gr.3)
R18 TDI Audi Team Sport Joest 2011 (Gr.1)
R18 TDI Le Mans 2011 (Gr.1)
R18 e-tron 2016 (Gr.1)
Sport quattro S1 Pikes Peak 1987 (Gr.B)
TTS Coupe 2014 (N300)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)

BMW (4)
M4 Coupe 2014 (N400)
M4 Safety Car (Gr.X)
M6 GT3 Walkenhorst Motorsport 2016 (Gr.3)
M6 GT3 M Power Livery 2016 (Gr.3)

BUGATTI (1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

CHEVROLET (1)
Corvette Stingray Race Concept (C2) 1959 (Gr.X)

DODGE (5)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Racing (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Street (Gr.X)
SRT Tomahawk VGT Technology (Gr.X)
Viper Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Viper SRT GT3-R 2015 (Gr.3)

FERRARI (4)
250 GT Berlinetta passo corto CN.2521 1961 (N300)
250 GTO CN.3729GT 1962 (Gr.X)
458 Italia 2009 (N600)
Dino 246GT 1971 (N200)

FORD (4)
GT LM Spec II Test Car (Gr.3)
Mustang Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Mustang GT Premium Fastback 2015 (N400)
Mustang Mach 1 1971 (N300)

GRAN TURISMO (4)
Amuse S2000 GT1 Turbo (N600)
Red Bull X2014 Standard 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2014 Junior 2014 (Gr.X)
Red Bull X2019 Competition (Gr.X)

HONDA (3)
NSX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
NSX Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Sports Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

HYUNDAI (4)
Genesis Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Genesis Gr.4 (Gr.4)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.1)
N 2025 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

JAGUAR (6)
D-Type 1954 (Gr.X)
E-Type Coupe 1961 (N300)
F-Type Gr.4 (Gr.4)
XJ13 1966 (Gr.X)
XJR-9 1988 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo Coupe (Gr.X)

LAMBORGHINI (3)
Aventador LP700-4 2011 (N700)
Huracan LP610-4 2015 (N600)
Miura P400 Bertone Prototype CN.0706 1967 (N400)

LEXUS (3)
LC500 2017 (N500)
LF-LC GT Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
RC F Gr.4 (Gr.4)

MAZDA (3)
Atenza Gr.3 Road Car (N500)
Atenza Gr.4 (Gr.4)
LM55 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MCLAREN (3)
650S GT3 2015 (Gr.3)
MP4-12c 2010 (N600)
Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MERCEDES-BENZ (5)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ (Gr.X)
AMG F1 W08 EQ Power+ Color Variation (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo LH Edition (Gr.X)
AMG Vision Gran Turismo Racing Series (Gr.X)

MINI (2)
Cooper S 2005 (N200)
Clubman Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

MITSUBISHI (4)
Lancer Evolution IV GSR 1996 (N300)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.3 (Gr.3)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
Lancer Evolution Final Edition Gr.B Road Car (N500)

NISSAN (6)
Concept 2020 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GT-R Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
GT-R Motul Autech 2016 (Gr.2)
GT-R Premium Edition 2017 (N600)
GT-R Safety Car (Gr.X)
GT-R Xanavi Nismo (Gr.2)

PEUGEOT (6)
208 GTI by Peugeot Sport 2014 (N200)
RCZ Gr.4 (Gr.4)
RCZ Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
L500R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.X)
L750R Hybrid Vision Gran Turismo 2017 (Gr.1)
Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)

PORSCHE (1)
911 GT3 (997) 2008 (N400)

RENAULT SPORT (1)
R.S.01 GT3 2016 (Gr.3)

SHELBY (1)
Cobra Daytona Coupe 1964 (Gr.X)

SUBARU (5)
BRZ S 2015 (N200)
BRZ Falken Tire/Turn 14 Distribution 2017 (Gr.X)
WRX Gr.3 (Gr.3)
WRX Gr.B (Gr.B)
WRX STI Type S 2014 (N300)

TOYOTA (10)
86 Gr.B Rally Car (Gr.B)
86 GRMN 2016 (N200)
86 GT 2015 (N200)
86 GT Limited 2016 (N200)
FT-1 (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
FT-1 Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)
GR Supra Racing Concept (Gr.3)
GR Supra RZ 2020 (N400)
TS030 Hybrid 2012 (Gr.1)

VOLKSWAGEN (4)
Scirocco Gr.4 (Gr.4)
Golf VII GTI 2014 (N200)
GTI Roadster Vision Gran Turismo (Gr.X)
GTI Vision Gran Turismo Gr.3 (Gr.3)


List of all this year's tested cars:

Mazda LM55 VGT Gr.1
Abarth 1500 Biposto
Mazda Roadster S modern
Bugatti Veyron Gr.4
Toyota S-FR
Honda NSX Gr.3
BMW M6 GT3
Mazda RX Vision GT3
Volkswagen Samba Bus Type 2
Ford GT
Nissan Skyline R34 GTR '02
Lamborghini Countach LP400
1989 Mercedes Sauber C9 Group C Prototype
Ford Mustang Gr3 Road Car
Subaru Impreza Coupe WRX Type R STI Version VI
Toyota Tundra TRD Pro '19
Porsche 962C
TVR Tuscan Speed 6
Citroen GT Gr.4
Dodge Tomahawk VGT Gr1
Volkswagen Beetle 1200 '66
Renault Sport Clio RS 220 EDC Trophy '15 and '16 versions
Peugeot 908 HDI FAP
KTM X-Bow R '12
Nissan Skyline GT-R V-Spec R33
Mito
2006 Dodge Viper SRT-10 Coupe
McLaren Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo Gr.1
Peugeot RCZ Gr.3 Road Car
Lamborghini Aventador LP 750-4 Superveloce
2016 au TOM'S RC F GT500
Honda S800 '66
Infiniti Concept VGT
Alfa Romeo 4C Launch Edition
Group C Nissan R92CP
Audi TT Cup Gr.4 '16
Nissan Fairlady Version S '07
Toyota 86 Gr.4
Aston Martin Vulcan
Mercedes Benz A 45 AMG 4Matic
Bugatti Vision Gran Turismo Gr.1
Mazda Atenza Sedan XD L Package '15
Lamborghini Huracan Gr.4
Aston Martin DB11 '16
Tesla Model S Signature Performance '12

Please add/correct, if sth. is missing. Thank you.

ALSO: we should have the following categories as well:


  • worst handling car
  • best handling car
This is not the same as beater or sleeper, because those describe a car more generally/overall, and not just one aspect of it.


Last, and to me VERY important point:
I was thinking about how we go about testing/reviewing cars in GT7 and/or how we could transition and I came up with the following possibilities, on which I would like to have the opinions of all of you. :)
1. My favourite: When we transition to GT7 (whenever that may be), we'll just take the list from this very thread of all the cars, that we still did not review and obviously add all of the new to GT7 cars to those as well. I think this makes the most sense, as reviewing ALL of GT7s cars takes far too long and doesn't make any sense really, as about 75% of those are in GTSport as well, and because we reviewed them here in this thread already, and also because GT7 is cross-gen.
2. We review in GT7 ONLY the cars, which are new to GT7 (compared to GTSport). This imo is a valid option too, but would leave out many amazing cars of GTSport, which we didn't review up until the transition, which would be a shame.

What do you all think? :)
 
Last edited:
ALSO: we should have the following categories as well:

  • worst handling car
  • best handling car
This is not the same as beater or sleeper, because those describe a car more generally/overall, and not just one aspect of it.


Last, and to me VERY important point:
I was thinking about how we go about testing/reviewing cars in GT7 and/or how we could transition and I came up with the following possibilities, on which I would like to have the opinions of all of you. :)
1. My favourite: When we transition to GT7 (whenever that may be), we'll just take the list from this very thread of all the cars, that we still did not review and obviously add all of the new to GT7 cars to those as well. I think this makes the most sense, as reviewing ALL of GT7s cars takes far too long and doesn't make any sense really, as about 75% of those are in GTSport as well, and because we reviewed them here in this thread already, and also because GT7 is cross-gen.
2. We review in GT7 ONLY the cars, which are new to GT7 (compared to GTSport). This imo is a valid option too, but would leave out many amazing cars of GTSport, which we didn't review up until the transition, which would be a shame.

What do you all think? :)
Yeah, I think Best and Worst handling can be their own awards! I'll slot them in and we'll see how it goes.

I am against the idea of carrying the list of tested cars over to GT7 for two reasons.

The first is that cars in GT7 may have been adjusted in handling. I've heard many people say the Veneno is really good in GT7 for example, but it was universally hated here in GTS for its understeer when we tested it. I recall Vic saying that the Infiniti VGT is a bit more settled in GT7, and another reviewer have also said that certain cars like the BMW VGT drive much better in GT7 than GTS. The list goes on. It wouldn't be fair at all to exclude these cars from GT7 just because we tested them in GTS. Gr.X cars here, like VGTs, might finally have some merit in GT7 with the PP system, so they're worth another look as well. Not to mention, with vastly more tuning options, many cars may make a lot more sense in GT7 than it did in GTS, such as the Kei cars, for example. Even though we run cars stock, there is merit to a car's tuning potential we shouldn't ignore.

The second reason is that we might get more participants in GT7, who have never been with us here in GTS. It wouldn't be fair to deny them the chance to experience these cars for themselves.
 
Yeah, I think Best and Worst handling can be their own awards! I'll slot them in and we'll see how it goes.

I am against the idea of carrying the list of tested cars over to GT7 for two reasons.

The first is that cars in GT7 may have been adjusted in handling. I've heard many people say the Veneno is really good in GT7 for example, but it was universally hated here in GTS for its understeer when we tested it. I recall Vic saying that the Infiniti VGT is a bit more settled in GT7, and another reviewer have also said that certain cars like the BMW VGT drive much better in GT7 than GTS. The list goes on. It wouldn't be fair at all to exclude these cars from GT7 just because we tested them in GTS. Gr.X cars here, like VGTs, might finally have some merit in GT7 with the PP system, so they're worth another look as well. Not to mention, with vastly more tuning options, many cars may make a lot more sense in GT7 than it did in GTS, such as the Kei cars, for example. Even though we run cars stock, there is merit to a car's tuning potential we shouldn't ignore.

The second reason is that we might get more participants in GT7, who have never been with us here in GTS. It wouldn't be fair to deny them the chance to experience these cars for themselves.

I understand. :) That means we'll never test 'em all though, that's for sure. :(
But yeah, there's worse in life I guess. ;)
 
I will not partake in the award ceremony this year as I have only tested 5 cars, so it doesnt seem worth it. As for GT7, option 1 is a good idea, however that would mean we would end up spending a ton of credits on the more expensive cars that we didnt get to in GTS, most of which have had their prices increased due to the LCD being introduced
 
Depends on what our goal is in regards to COTW GT7 edition. If the goal is to bring new members in, then I think the obvious choice is to start from scratch. That way new members can pick their favorite cars which have most likely already been test-driven by us

To those of you who regularly partake in GT7 LOBBIES….

Are they completely broken? Reason I ask, is I feel like there eventually needs to be a cross over point I reckon
 
Depends on what our goal is in regards to COTW GT7 edition. If the goal is to bring new members in, then I think the obvious choice is to start from scratch. That way new members can pick their favorite cars which have most likely already been test-driven by us

To those of you who regularly partake in GT7 LOBBIES….

Are they completely broken? Reason I ask, is I feel like there eventually needs to be a cross over point I reckon
They are not "completely" broken. But there are still glitch issues that don't seem to be quite so bad in sport.
Having said that, now that you can set grids that's nice. But you still cant track vote as far as I know. Correct me if I'm wrong, I'm not super up to date on that stuff.
I love the physics of gt7 and have been doing lobbies in 2 series, both have had issues with glitches causing problems between drivers and hosts.
I think we as a group are grown up enough to deal with it and stay friends even with the glitch contact.
But getting new members with the lobbies glitching in such an odd way seems difficult.
But we are all friends, so I'm sure the group won't shrink if we move to gt7.
 
They are not "completely" broken. But there are still glitch issues that don't seem to be quite so bad in sport.
Having said that, now that you can set grids that's nice. But you still cant track vote as far as I know. Correct me if I'm wrong, I'm not super up to date on that stuff.
I love the physics of gt7 and have been doing lobbies in 2 series, both have had issues with glitches causing problems between drivers and hosts.
I think we as a group are grown up enough to deal with it and stay friends even with the glitch contact.
But getting new members with the lobbies glitching in such an odd way seems difficult.
But we are all friends, so I'm sure the group won't shrink if we move to gt7.

What are the player-host problems that you've seen? As far as the general lag between players, is it a total hinderance, or just a nuisance?

In the end, I think its just a matter of what the group wants moving forward and what the priorities are. As the partest' of part-timers here, I don't care either way. But like Square mentioned in the group chat thingee.... I'm also not sure we'll get GTS-esque lobbies for a while
 
As far as the general lag between players, is it a total hinderance, or just a nuisance?
Most of what I've seen is what I call the lag shuffle. A car that's lagging will shuffle side to side while driving, with the effect more pronounced on corners and almost nonexistent on straights. It can be difficult establishing a car's position when it's shuffling.
 
I think it’s time for another test lobby. There’s enough of us from all different corners of flat earth, and there’s a pretty even split between ps4/ps5 players
 
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