Motorcycle Questions

Discussion in 'Motorcycles' started by Dan, Sep 14, 2016.

  1. Dan

    Dan Premium

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    Hi there. I have a few questions about motorcycles that hopefully you guys could answer for me:

    1: How many modifications would it take to make a Moto GP bike street-legal? Cars and their racing variants are vastly different, but there's less parts and safety features on motorcycles, so I imagine they aren't too different.

    2: Since when have racing bikes required these large spoilers/canards/aerodynamic parts?

    3: Why do some motorcycles only have one headlight on the side working? In the past while out driving, I noticed a few high-performance bikes had two headlights, but only one side will be on.
     
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  2. Carlos

    Carlos Premium

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    Hmm really have no clue what you have to do to make it legal but Honda and Ducati went through the trouble. There's the Honda RC213V-S and the Ducati Desmosedici RR. Not sure if they are fun to drive but I assume not, the suspension must be terribly stiff.

    Those canards are banned for 2017 so.. Ducati started it but others put it on too. It probably helps a lot keeping the front wheel down. Having a wheelie is the last thing you want when you open the throttle, it slows you down.

    I have both headlights working but it's just how the manufacturer made it. I assume most are only working on one side because they just work better these days or for safety reasons. Like with a car they are aligned to one side, depending on which side your country drives.
     
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  3. Dan

    Dan Premium

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    Thanks for answering. :tup:
     
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  4. mustangGT90210

    mustangGT90210

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    To convert a moto-gp bike, it takes a lot of testing. Emission testing, specifically. Plus it'll need lights, and indicators. That's just the surface stuff, I'm sure there's more underneath it. Honda has their road legal GP bike for sale currently, at a very affordable $184,000...

    As far as the 2 headlight thing goes, it's actually a pretty good system. One side is the low beam, the other side is the high beam. Having 2 separate reflectors means that each light can be better at it's function, instead of sharing the reflector, essentially. On low beam, one light will be on, and on high beam, both housings will be lit up
     
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  5. Carlos

    Carlos Premium

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    Been searching a bit on those canards and it seems to be a pretty old idea. 1979/1980:
    [​IMG]

    Clear picture of how big they are now
    [​IMG]

    Rumors are a mechanic even cut his head on one of those things. Ducati is said to be working heavily on them because this way without electronic wheelie control the driver could give 100% of the engine torque. But it's all gone next year.

    Probably more fun is a street WSBK bike. WSBK has homologation rules so that way you can buy a top notch bike already. Like my bike for example, Aprilia has it's roots in racing and so they made circuit spec versions. It has Ohlins suspension and steering damper, Brembo brakes, a lot of carbon and forged aluminium wheels. And everyone in WSBK drives with headlight stickers to resemble the street bike.

    So you have Aprilia RSV4 RF, BMW S1000RR HP4, Ducati 1299 Panigale R, Honda CBR1000RR SP, MV Agusta F4 RR, Yamaha R1M. Kawasaki don't seem to have a better spec version, so they must be using the regular ZX-10R. Suzuki don't care about WSBK, just gives it the same color as their MotoGP bike.
    [​IMG]

    Anyway :p Enough choices it seems. I'd probably go with the F4 RR, that thing is gorgeous!!
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Digitally adjust your Ohlins settings :crazy:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. wfooshee

    wfooshee Premium

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    Making a Moto-GP bike legal.... Are you talking about a private citizen or the manufacturer. If a private citizen, where are you going to get one? If for a manufacturer, it will be EXPENSIVE!!!!! The price of the Honda has already been mentioned.

    Keep in mind that Moto-GP bikes are prototypes. They don't use production frames or engines or components, or suspension or anything. they are built for the track, using parts made for the purpose. The grips might be off the shelf, but not much else!

    Several issues about being street legal would be lighting, horns, emissions, gauges, and on and on. The suspensions are built for racing tires and the grip those provide, and street tires would change the setup completely. You'd likely want a starter on your bike, and that means a battery and stator instead of a magneto. So where are those things going to go? Emissions means a catalytic converter in the exhaust, and street riding does not need the cooling capacity they need to run 200 mph all day on the track. Emissions also means government testing and certification, which is not inexpensive, especially given that the engines are not production engines, so they can't just throw together the stuff they already certified for your CBR or your GSX: they're starting from scratch. and that front cowling, with its air intakes and radiator ducts, has to be thrown away and replicated with something that holds headlight and turn signals.

    There is an awful lot of stuff to change, just so you can ride it on the street, where it's going to suck being on it anyway. Just get an R1 with the replica fairing and be done with it. :)
     
  7. Dan

    Dan Premium

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    Wow. Thanks for your insight. I never knew how complex these bikes truly are. You've really opened my eyes. :tup:
     
  8. The Vanishing Boy

    The Vanishing Boy Premium

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    -> This new Kawi H2 is almost there, but the H2R is not SL anymore:

    [​IMG]

    -> There is also the new CBR1000RR SP2:

    [​IMG]

    ^ But to be honest, based on what I've heard, race bikes turned street legal is a bit impractical. Dirt bike people knew this whole well.
     
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  9. Skython

    Skython

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    Yet people are allowed to operate an H2R with its bird wings. :p

    [​IMG]

    Also, if the bike did get into a proper wheelie with those aerodynamic bits, wouldn't that make the point that sends you off the back of the bike much sooner as they would act like a wind catch and push the front of the bike backwards? (though I don't really know why you'd be at much of a wheelie angle on a bike like that) :p
     
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  10. Barracuda413

    Barracuda413

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    Race bikes are custom built, so the easiest way to get a street legal race bike is to build one using a street bike as a donor,
     
  11. Swagger897

    Swagger897 Premium

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    Thread bump....

    Almost at 500 miles ridden on the bike over the last two weeks and tomorrow I'm leaving to go back to school. Just curious on what kind of chain cleaner and lubricants people use. The Yammi OM calls for kerosene and motor oil for cleaner and lube, which I'm not opposed to using it but I'd rather find something that I can just go to the auto-store and pick up from the shelf.
     
  12. wfooshee

    wfooshee Premium

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    You can get a spray chain lube, I don't know how it does for cleaning, though. I think cleaners are a separate product. Since ride a shaftie, I don't much care... :lol: :p I've just seen my brother use it.

    The sprays aren't terribly expensive, but if you compare the prices to a few ounces of kerosene and motor oil, they're HUGELY expensive, like hundreds of times the cost!!! But where ya gonna store kerosene, and get more when you need it?
     
  13. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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    Are there any markers I should look for as an indication tires may be too old or worn for safe riding? Mileage and age are unknowns, but the bike has been sitting with weight off of the tires for ~18 months and I didn't get notice any unease from the rubber on a quick ride that didn't exceed 25mph per the residential speed limit.

    Universal indicators are the most I expect from here, but the tires in question are Dunlop K70s if that may result in more specific information.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Eunos_Cosmo

    Eunos_Cosmo Premium

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    Don't all tires have their manufacture date printed on the sidewall?
     
  15. Dotini

    Dotini Premium

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    I've ridden very long distances on chain drive motorcycles and raced chain drive karts for many years, so I've learned a thing or two about chain cleaning and lubrication.

    First of all, it helps if you have a center stand and can lift the rear tire and roll the chain in neutral over an area you've prepared for drips. Check for any kinks, stiff or rough links.

    I like to clean the chain with a rag wet with WD-40. I do not try to get solvent of any kind between the plates or rollers of the chain, but merely wipe all dirt and excess lubricant from the outside of the chain until its clean. If you have access to compressed air this is a good way to help clean the chain of small particles and any grit.

    For a lubricant, I always purchase a quality lubricant at a motorcycle dealership or independent shop. I like Silkolene best, it will not fling off too bad.
    Lube both sides of the chain, links and rollers. Roll the chain awhile, letting it get thoroughly lubed. Let the excess drip off, then wipe remaining excess with a dry rag. Make sure you have adequate tension on the chain.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2019
  16. TexRex

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    Yep, first half of 2013, but does that tell the whole story?
     
  17. Eunos_Cosmo

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    I've heard that the rule of thumb is tires older than 5-6 years should be replaced. If you're in a dry climate, that might be shorter. The tires on my Boxster were pretty nasty with dry rot and they were from 2012. I replaced them earlier this year when I noticed it...
     
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  18. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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    Gotcha.
     
  19. wfooshee

    wfooshee Premium

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    If the rubber's cracking anywhere, get rid of them, but based on 2013, I'd say get rid of them regardless.