Project Cars on iMac via Bootcamp and Steam

Discussion in 'Project CARS 1' started by ankehuber, Sep 23, 2014.

  1. ankehuber

    ankehuber

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    Rather than spend money on a PS4 purely to play Project Cars, I have decided, I think, to go down the route of installing Windows on my iMac via Bootcamp and playing that way. As well as the cost saving this would also benefit me as I can have a steering wheel near my iMac and I can't near my TV.

    Now the questions begin. Does anyone think this is a better idea than buying a PS4 to play the game? I am presuming the Steam version of the game will have more options than the PS4 version.

    Also would my iMac run the game better than the PS4 and will it run with the rather spiffing Ultra settings I've been seeing in videos online? My iMac is a 2014 3.4GHz i7 with NVDIA GeForce GTX 680MX 2GB RAM.

    Final question: which version of Windows should I get if I do go down this route?

    Thank you
     
  2. DrJustice

    DrJustice

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    Yes, I think it's a good idea. You can use any kind of sim peripherals (wheels, buttons boxes, instrumentation, motion rigs etc..). When the modding starts, you're in on it if you want to (initially you can use custom liveries). It's cheaper (well, there's not a lot to save, but...).

    AFAIK the game as such won't have many more options on the PC, except for graphics quality and resolution settings and API enabling (for datalogging, instruments, motion rigs etc.).

    Your iMac is fully capable of running Project CARS with good graphics and framerates. Don't expect to be able to go "ultra" on all settings though (not necessary for a good experience anyway). If you iMac has less than 8GB of RAM, now would be the time to add some of that. You also have the option of picking up another cheap GTX 680 later for a big boost in graphics and framerate (might require replacing the power supply).

    You might as well go for Windows 8, unless you have any specific reason to run an older version. If you install Windows and get on Steam, a whole new world of gaming is opening up for you, including other racing games/sims.
     
  3. ankehuber

    ankehuber

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    Thanks very much for the detailed reply.

    I was reading articles online that recommended installing Windows 7 for games, not sure why, I am completely lost when it comes to Windows. I will go and have a look at 8 now though.

    I do wonder too though if I install Windows straight out of the box is it perfectly setup for running Project Cars? I have no clue how to set Windows up, I am presuming it comes pre-installed with lots of stuff that is not needed that might slow down the game?

    Now to go read up on Bootcamp...
     
  4. Soulfresh_ACV

    Soulfresh_ACV

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    I hope you do take breaks often when pushing your iMac's GPU while playing Project Cars. You don't want to fry your $2K+ iMac. Please get a fan :lol:

    I question the cost factor as well. The more you play 3D intensive games on your iMac, the shorter the lifespan of the hardware as a result of the ventilation designed for the slim profile. It's like playing games on a laptop for extended periods of time. It never ends well. And it's different from doing CAD/Video Editing etc. for work as it's more build for that sort of application.

    If for whatever reason you don't want to buy a game console, I would suggest to get a proper PC. $600+ should get you something better than your iMac while you can use your iMac as a screen. When Oculus comes out, you can be sure that you will be able to upgrade anything that is needed. Purely personal opinion, I'll avoid playing games on an iMac.

    You still have plenty of time to decide though which is a good thing.


    Good luck
    :cheers:
     
  5. DrJustice

    DrJustice

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    ^ Ahh, seems like it's one of those with everything built into the screen... Didn't think about that, so good point, Soulfresh. Too bad. In that case I'd also recommend getting a proper modular computer in a well ventilated chassis, but then the project becomes a bit more expensive. How is it with the Apple OS these days, can it be installed on non-Apple hardware?
     
  6. Punknoodle

    Punknoodle

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    I don't agree with this. Computer components get hot while working. It's just how it is, the computer will shut down or crash before you do any damage to it. I've played games on my laptop, watched movies while in bed with it sitting on he blanket with no airflow because I've forgotten to put something under it on multiple occasions and it just turns off if it gets too hot. Boot it back up again and it's ready to rock.

    To the OP, when you install Windows it will come with a heap of crap installed but you can just go in to the Control Panel and uninstall anything you don't need. You will need Windows drivers for all of your hardware so it's probably a good idea to download them in preparation for when you do it.
     
  7. Soulfresh_ACV

    Soulfresh_ACV

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    I guess you're lucky. Some people like to abuse their belongings but I'm those would don't. I'm sure the manual came with your laptop will suggest that otherwise. Overheating your hardware to the point where it shuts down automatically means that damaging has been done, regardless whether it's minimal or not.

    Anyway, different opinions and but I'll stick to mine because that's how I fried my iMac in 2009. Not sure if you have looked at the vents on the 2014 iMac models, they have much less airflow to cool the internals. Just helping out fellow gamer and based on past incident. I rather spend $800 than to risk $2K+ machine. And I will suggest that you do the same @Punknoodle. And safety first as well and not leave your laptop on the blanket while covering the vents. Big fire risk hazard mate.


    There's still Hackintosh. Haven't tried it but think it's still possible with certain motherboard etc. But definitely no point of building one with Mac OS for gaming.
     
  8. Punknoodle

    Punknoodle

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    Obviously I dont recommend running it with the vents blocked, I was merely using that as an example that even in extreme situations, these things are designed to shut themselves off. My laptop has copped plenty of abuse, I use it at work, at home, even in the car for tuning my ECU, playing games, running intensive software, and its 4 years old and still going strong.

    If you are worried about using the computer in the manor in which it was designed for (as in, running software) for fear of overheating it then what's the point in buying said computer? If it can't handle running an intensive program for a while then it's obviously crap.
     
  9. Soulfresh_ACV

    Soulfresh_ACV

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    Well, iMacs are not designed for gaming in mind just like some cars aren't designed for racing but doesn't mean it's not a good car though. I'll leave this part of discussion to this very point as I have not intention of moving forward. You might be right and it doesn't matter. Best of luck. :cheers:

    @ankehuber Welcome to GTP and apologies at the same time as discussion can sometimes deviate off track. I hope you'll find our opinions a bit helpful. But like I said, you've got plenty of time to decide ;). I bought a PS4 just recently one reason is PCars as well. But I have the benefit to enjoy some other PS exclusives in years to come which is a no brainer for me as PCs don't get those exclusives.

    Having said that, I did buy a PC 2 and half years ago as a basic gaming machine for around USD$500. After playing Assetto Corsa for a bit and the GPU isn't good enough to sustain 60fps with medium to low graphics settings, my plan is to upgrade the GPU in the coming months and my budget for that will be around $300 which will probably have better GFX than PS4 and that gives you an example of flexibility that PCs have when it comes to gaming.
     
  10. ankehuber

    ankehuber

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    Thanks for this great reply. I must admit I am rather concerned about the iMac overheating, I really don't want to put too much stress on it as I had a 2011 iMac die on me from a frazzled graphics card a few years ago.

    I did see mentioned somewhere about putting a fan on the base pointing at the ventilation slots, I think this would be a good purchase if I did go down this route.

    Thanks again.
     
  11. ankehuber

    ankehuber

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    That comment just equalised out the worries I had with a big chuckle :D
     
  12. DrJustice

    DrJustice

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    That might be a good idea. I have to add that the suggestion of adding another graphics card is out, since your computer doesn't have expansion slot for it. As mentioned I was thinking a "normal" motherboard and chassis in my initial reply - sorry for a that confusion. The CPU is very strong, and the GPU should be able to pull pCARS along, just check that you have, or can have, 8GB of RAM. It's always worth a try, at the cost of a copy of Windows (which might be handy anyway), and then the game on Steam. If it doesn't work out well, you can use your Windows copy and Steam games on a purpose built gaming PC later.
     
  13. ankehuber

    ankehuber

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    Thanks, I think it's at least worth having a go at before Project Cars comes out, and then I can always go back to a PS4 if it doesn't work out.
     
    Johnnypenso likes this.
  14. GBO Possum

    GBO Possum Premium

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    Does anyone have experience with Project Cars on an iMac?

    I have a mid 2011 27" iMac 32GB RAM, with AMD Radeon HD 6970M with 2GB.

    Each Thunderbolt port has an external 22" monitor attached, one to the right, one to the left. (Three monitors total)

    It's connected optically to 5.1 for audio.

    In its day, it was the absolute top of the line iMac. It's still a smoker! It runs Elder Scrolls Online perfectly, except I have yet to find a way of spreading ESO across three screens.

    Any advice from the iMac community?