Rally's voyage to survival and section camping

Discussion in 'The Rumble Strip' started by Rallywagon, Jul 2, 2018.

  1. Rallywagon

    Rallywagon Premium

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    So, ive been glamping for a number of years now. We had a pop up that we used. We sold it last season as my wife was pregnant and camping was/is out of the picture for the next couple years. We aren't going to be the campers we hated, bringing a crying baby to the camp grounds, screaming its annoying face off.
    With that said, ive decided to take this time to get into real camping and thru hiking. The plan is to familiarize and condition myself this year and next un the woods and paths around MI. Eventually the idea is to do some proper trips up in Canadia and Alaska and to thru hike trails like the APT and PCT.
    Ive started conditioning already, and honestly im not that bad out of shape, being a fairly active fellow. Once my ruck arrives (decided to go with a slightly smaller ruck than my old army mollie kit, which is huge and heavy) i'll be piling in some weights and hoofing that a few miles every other day.
    Outside of this, is there anyone on the forum that does this kinda stuff? Any pro tips and advice? What kinda gear do you use? How much are you packing? I am not obsessed with weight savings. I am used to rucking 15+ miles a day with nearly 100 lbs of gear at about 5k ASL elevation. I havent got a base weight yet, but I am guessing it'll be about 30lbs ish.
    All that said, i hope to do some good documentation of my adventures and look forward to sharing them.
     
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  2. SPhilli911

    SPhilli911

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    My dad has been hiking all his life, mostly in the Northeast area like VT, and NH. 2 years ago he did the Appalachian Trail heading North… a dream of his that he accomplished. After that he did the Long Trail in VT and is currently heading out to Yosemite to do something new. He is 61 years old and in better shape than me!

    Anyways, for the Appalachian he used (and would strongly suggest, probably) a 65 liter pack. He carried no more than 25-30lbs on the trail. Course he carried only what he needed during each stretch and he had all ultralight gear. We would mail him supplies along the way. I could get more info, for sure, as he was very meticulous in the planning of that hike. 25-30lbs may not sound like much but over the course of days, weeks or months it will feel like a lot.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2018
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  3. Rallywagon

    Rallywagon Premium

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    More info would be great! I think once I work up to a trail like the Appalachians, I'll likely have the experiemce to better pick my gear and have moved on from the ruck I have now. Anything I am doing right now will be long weekend trips so I am not needing quite the pack requirements. But like I said, I am not hard up on weight, at least not yet. I've rucked 15-20+ miles a day for weeks with around 75 lbs of gear, in full uniform and combat gear. Doing it with a total load around 40, in shorts shoes and wearing a hat instead of a kpot, that will be pretty nice honestly.
    To be frank, my worry isnt my endurance, its my feet and making sure my pack is right. I definitely dont wanna pack something ill never use while missing out on something I'll need frequently.
    Thanks for the reply though, i look forward to any info you may be able to glean from your father.
     
  4. Roo

    Roo Premium

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    I can recommend Bill Bryson's book A Walk in the Woods, where he attempts to hike the AT. It was published back in 1998 so some of the practical details will have changed (there might be better maps nowadays, for example), but as a description of the experience I don't know of any better.
     
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  5. Rallywagon

    Rallywagon Premium

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    Went on my first hike this weekend. Me and a friend traversed North Manitou Island. All told we pumped out a bit over 20 miles in under 48 hours. Got on the island around 2 pm friday and were headed back to the main land noon Sunday.
    The hike wasnt to extreme. The maintained trails were easy to follow and the terrain wasnt to bad. The island itself was beautiful as well. All told it was a positive experience and definitely built up my confidence to start doing bigger section hikes. I'll definitely be visiting the island again. Probably annually in fact. We only got to a few of the old historical ruins as we were worried about how much progress we would be able to make.
    Here are some pictures from the journey. Time for an overloaded, anyone still on dial up?
    Here was our planned route. Stuck to it too.
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    Here is South (left) and North (right) Manitou Island's.
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    Getting to North Manitou
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    Various pictures of the island and some of its ruins
    I see you!
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  6. Joey D

    Joey D Contributing Writer

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    I've been to North Manitou a couple of times, pretty cool place to hike around. Although all I really remember is getting eaten alive by bugs. Same with South Manitou as well.

    Not sure if you've been to Beaver Island, but that's worth a visit too. It's not nearly as remote as the Manitou Islands though, but it has an interesting history. Back in the 1800's it was known as the Mormon Kingdom. That alone made it worth the visit for me since it's just so off the wall. It's mostly a place to bike and camp though with a few day hikes here and there.

    But I'm guessing if you're really looking into more wilderness stuff, you're probably considering Isle Royale? It's a place I always wanted to go but driving from the Detroit area to Houghton Hancock seemed awful.
     
  7. Rallywagon

    Rallywagon Premium

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    Isle royal, governement island, the porcupine mountains. Got an exhaustive list around MI. Hoping to get them all done once in the next year or two, then when my son is old enough, take my two kids out as well. I have a few field guides but I'd like to learn how better to forge while on the trail and to have a better idea of the flora and fauna types. Maybe just improve my overall survival skills.
    I also want to do a better job photographing and chronicling these trips. This trip was quite amazing and I am doing a fairly inadequate job conveying its awesomeness.
    Probably should retitled this post now though...
     
  8. TexRex

    TexRex

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    Probably easier to just bring a spare knife in case your first one splits...

    :sly:
     
  9. Rallywagon

    Rallywagon Premium

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    Errr, forage....:dunce:
     
  10. TexRex

    TexRex

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