Carlos and his Aprilia

  • Thread starter Carlos
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Cleans up well! I've always been a sucker for black and gold, ever since the JPS Lotuses of the 70s.

A note about my brother's Honda.... That VTR-1000 was called Superhawk in the U.S. and Firestorm in Europe, if that helps tell you what it is.

Not a comfortable road bike, and very short range on a tank, not much more than 100 miles! Geared fairly tall, you can hardly get past third gear in town. Unique swingarm setup, swingarm attaches to the engine rather than the frame.

Firestorm does say something to me but if you would ask before I wouldn't know it was that bike. Maybe because of fireblade..

And 100miles?! How large is the tank? Or how small..

What advantages do you have when the engine is linked to the swingarm?
 
Yesterday the weather was great and couldn't resist to take her out... on the trailer! :D Drove to a nice spot and took it off the trailer to take some photos.

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Should have gone earlier though when the sun was at a better position. But when I get my license I'll have all the time for photo opportunities :D
 
The VTR Firestorm was never a great seller in the U.K., and that engine drinks fuel.

Ah! Someone who understands the bike perfectly!!!

And 100miles?! How large is the tank? Or how small..

4.2 gallons. Yes, well under 30 miles per gallon!

What advantages do you have when the engine is linked to the swingarm?

You think I know??!?!?! :)
As it's been explained to me, it allows more specific tuning of the flex at the rear end for better cornering.
 
Sometime last year around this time I got the itch for a bike, but it was just a spike in interest.


Now after scrolling through YouTube a good bit, I realized just how many people here in Georgia are huge motovloggers, which is cool, but not what I want to do though.

There are quite a lot of Yamah R6's around me for sale at good prices, however I'm going to have to wait maybe another year or so until I think about getting a bike.
 
Sometime last year around this time I got the itch for a bike, but it was just a spike in interest.


Now after scrolling through YouTube a good bit, I realized just how many people here in Georgia are huge motovloggers, which is cool, but not what I want to do though.

There are quite a lot of Yamah R6's around me for sale at good prices, however I'm going to have to wait maybe another year or so until I think about getting a bike.

I would encourage you anytime to get a motorcycle, I'm having a lot of fun! Yamaha R6 is nice but too small for me, I'm around 1.90m.

Do you have to get a motorcycle license over there?
 
I would encourage you anytime to get a motorcycle, I'm having a lot of fun! Yamaha R6 is nice but too small for me, I'm around 1.90m.
See,that's another issue which hopefully when I go sit on one will solve the issue, but I'm only 5' 6", or about 1.64m...
I just hope both my feet will touch, and if not, I can always drop them from what I've read.

Do you have to get a motorcycle license over there?
Yes, and the funny thing is you can get one without ever having to ride a bike.

The way I see it going down, is I'll have to take an MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation (basically a "How To" ride a bike class) course, which costs $150 for me. That lasts two days, day 1 is class lecture and written test, day two is a series of course tests on the bike (Instant fail if you drop the bike).

After that, go take my certificate to the department of motor vehicles (DMV), and get my license. Then.... After that, go out, find some insurance for the bike I want, buy it, then go register it back at the DMV, and pay 6.7% sales tax on it, even if was a private sale... Good thing is though, the MSF course should pay itself off with the huge discounts that the companies give.... Bad thing, I've gotten a ticket (two years ago) for speeding, and I'm still 19 (I'm thinking (hopefull) sometime next June/July I'll finally get one..) which almost makes that discount nill.

My fear is I'm too short, as I've always had to use the tips of my toes for the bikes I used to ride (the terrible, terrible physical labor ones) to touch the ground....
 
See,that's another issue which hopefully when I go sit on one will solve the issue, but I'm only 5' 6", or about 1.64m...
I just hope both my feet will touch, and if not, I can always drop them from what I've read.


Yes, and the funny thing is you can get one without ever having to ride a bike.

The way I see it going down, is I'll have to take an MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation (basically a "How To" ride a bike class) course, which costs $150 for me. That lasts two days, day 1 is class lecture and written test, day two is a series of course tests on the bike (Instant fail if you drop the bike).

After that, go take my certificate to the department of motor vehicles (DMV), and get my license. Then.... After that, go out, find some insurance for the bike I want, buy it, then go register it back at the DMV, and pay 6.7% sales tax on it, even if was a private sale... Good thing is though, the MSF course should pay itself off with the huge discounts that the companies give.... Bad thing, I've gotten a ticket (two years ago) for speeding, and I'm still 19 (I'm thinking (hopefull) sometime next June/July I'll finally get one..) which almost makes that discount nill.

My fear is I'm too short, as I've always had to use the tips of my toes for the bikes I used to ride (the terrible, terrible physical labor ones) to touch the ground....

Being not so tall is actually better, most bikes are more comfortable when you are not as tall as me. Because of my length I lean on my wrists much more than you would.

Doesn't sound hard to get your certificate, go for it :D
 
Being not so tall is actually better, most bikes are more comfortable when you are not as tall as me. Because of my length I lean on my wrists much more than you would.

Doesn't sound hard to get your certificate, go for it :D
Yeah, I think I'll just get it, and see/ wait for the bike later on..


I'm quite confident I could reach pedals. I just read that you normally want to be flat-footed on the ground when stopped vs. tippy-toeing it.
 
Yeah, I think I'll just get it, and see/ wait for the bike later on..


I'm quite confident I could reach pedals. I just read that you normally want to be flat-footed on the ground when stopped vs. tippy-toeing it.

Yeah that's right but..... if you don't have sticks as legs you can just lean to one side and get one foot flat on the ground. That's how they learn how to drive here in the Netherlands actually. When you stop for a red light, right foot on the ground and the left on the peddle.
 
When you stop for a red light, right foot on the ground and the left on the peddle.

The MSF taught me differently: Left foot on the ground, right foot holding the brake. You've already shifted down to 1st while you were stopping, and you shouldn't wait in neutral. Neutral makes it hard to get outa Dodge if you have to!

(I actually use whichever foot happens to be convenient, and hold the front brake, but for the course and its riding test......)
 
The MSF taught me differently: Left foot on the ground, right foot holding the brake. You've already shifted down to 1st while you were stopping, and you shouldn't wait in neutral. Neutral makes it hard to get outa Dodge if you have to!

(I actually use whichever foot happens to be convenient, and hold the front brake, but for the course and its riding test......)

My instinct wanted to do this too, the first few lessons. I thought it was weird I had to put my right foot on the ground. But they wanted me to use both brakes just before coming to a stop, put right foot on the ground. Now I do it like you, since I don't want to hold the front brake when I'm on a road that is down/uphill.
 
Yeah, I think I'll just get it, and see/ wait for the bike later on..


I'm quite confident I could reach pedals. I just read that you normally want to be flat-footed on the ground when stopped vs. tippy-toeing it.

I'm 177cm tall and the r6 I can just about get two feet on the ground with a bit of tip toeing. My friend is a little shorter than me and he can manage ok, just he can't have two feet on the ground. The CBR 600 has a lower seat. The R6 is like a rocket ship it feels really fast and exciting, but you will probably be able to go quicker on the cbr, they are very easy to throw around and give good feed back, the r6 is a bit edgy. I'd still probably buy an r6 just because it looks so good, feels so fast and has a really addictive sound that comes from the intake at the front, but the cbr would probably be better in most situations other than with a skilled racer riding them. I drove a few 600s back to back and the r6 feels like in a different league, though I can melt the tyres on a cbr and only confident enough to get the r6 tyres a little bubbly on a race track.

Nice bike by the way Carlos, I thought I was going to see more two strokes in here though ;).
 
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I'm 177cm tall and the r6 I can just about get two feet on the ground with a bit of tip toeing. My friend is a little shorter than me and he can manage ok, just he can't have two feet on the ground. The CBR 600 has a lower seat. The R6 is like a rocket ship it feels really fast and exciting, but you will probably be able to go quicker on the cbr, they are very easy to throw around and give good feed back, the r6 is a bit edgy. I'd still probably buy an r6 just because it looks so good, feels so fast and has a really addictive sound that comes from the intake at the front, but the cbr would probably be better in most situations other than with a skilled racer riding them. I drove a few 600s back to back and the r6 feels like in a different league, though I can melt the tyres on a cbr and only confident enough to get the r6 tyres a little bubbly on a race track.

Nice bike by the way Carlos, I thought I was going to see more two strokes in here though ;).
Im not one to be constantly hooning around on it to go 130 mph on the highways, but just the acceleration over a 250 is what i want.


Plus the looks, have not seen a more better looking bike for that model year and price.
 
See,that's another issue which hopefully when I go sit on one will solve the issue, but I'm only 5' 6", or about 1.64m...
I just hope both my feet will touch, and if not, I can always drop them from what I've read.


Yes, and the funny thing is you can get one without ever having to ride a bike.

The way I see it going down, is I'll have to take an MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation (basically a "How To" ride a bike class) course, which costs $150 for me. That lasts two days, day 1 is class lecture and written test, day two is a series of course tests on the bike (Instant fail if you drop the bike).

After that, go take my certificate to the department of motor vehicles (DMV), and get my license. Then.... After that, go out, find some insurance for the bike I want, buy it, then go register it back at the DMV, and pay 6.7% sales tax on it, even if was a private sale... Good thing is though, the MSF course should pay itself off with the huge discounts that the companies give.... Bad thing, I've gotten a ticket (two years ago) for speeding, and I'm still 19 (I'm thinking (hopefull) sometime next June/July I'll finally get one..) which almost makes that discount nill.

My fear is I'm too short, as I've always had to use the tips of my toes for the bikes I used to ride (the terrible, terrible physical labor ones) to touch the ground....

In Americaland, do they supply you a bike for your MSF course? Or do you have to bring your own? Because here they put us all on a bunch of GN250s (or was it a 125? I don't know, it was a year and a bit ago). And how much prior riding experience have you had? Because if you haven't had much, I'd recommend you start on something smaller than a Supersport. You can get a used Ninja 250, or a CBR250 for quite cheap now. And then after that go for a bigger bike. It just means that in the case you make a silly mistake on the road while getting used to riding, you're not crashing a pricey bike, and you're not going so fast. And the lack of weight also means you can do slow maneuvering easier, which is most of what they test for the riding skills test.

And honestly, if you have any good winding roads near you, the beginner bikes will be an absolute blast, I managed to have great fun on a Scorpio 225 for ages because I didn't have to worry about damaging the bike, and I could fly through corners.
 
Sweet bike, dude! I usually like bikes from another Italian motorcycle maker (Ducati), but this Aprilia is quite lovely. Just wanted to show some love for this motorcycle here. Keep her in good shape and ride smart. 👍
 
In Americaland, do they supply you a bike for your MSF course? Or do you have to bring your own? Because here they put us all on a bunch of GN250s (or was it a 125? I don't know, it was a year and a bit ago).
They supply 125s but you can bring what you own as well.

And how much prior riding experience have you had? Because if you haven't had much, I'd recommend you start on something smaller than a Supersport. You can get a used Ninja 250, or a CBR250 for quite cheap now. And then after that go for a bigger bike. It just means that in the case you make a silly mistake on the road while getting used to riding, you're not crashing a pricey bike, and you're not going so fast. And the lack of weight also means you can do slow maneuvering easier, which is most of what they test for the riding skills test.
See, this is where I've read a lot of stuff similar to this on what should someone with zero experience on a bike (like myself) start out with. Some people say to start low because you're just gonna want to go balls-to-the-wall fast, not me. Some people say that if you're already a bad drive, it's not meant for you. Again, not me. I critique myself as much as possible and others while driving, and try to the best of my abilities to avoid any accident all around me.

And the price thing doesn't really bother me that much, because I'd be buying used to start off with anyways. Pegs, fairings, mirrors can be bought for cheap on the interwebz if they get scratched up, so I'm not worried so much about dropping it as much as someone hitting it.

And honestly, if you have any good winding roads near you, the beginner bikes will be an absolute blast, I managed to have great fun on a Scorpio 225 for ages because I didn't have to worry about damaging the bike, and I could fly through corners.
Sadly I have none. Most of them are long straight roads and hilly. Anything that is good is about three-four hours north of me. I think it's called Tale of the Dragon, which seems to be pretty popular with most motovloggers...
 
They supply 125s but you can bring what you own as well.


See, this is where I've read a lot of stuff similar to this on what should someone with zero experience on a bike (like myself) start out with. Some people say to start low because you're just gonna want to go balls-to-the-wall fast, not me. Some people say that if you're already a bad drive, it's not meant for you. Again, not me. I critique myself as much as possible and others while driving, and try to the best of my abilities to avoid any accident all around me.

And the price thing doesn't really bother me that much, because I'd be buying used to start off with anyways. Pegs, fairings, mirrors can be bought for cheap on the interwebz if they get scratched up, so I'm not worried so much about dropping it as much as someone hitting it.


Sadly I have none. Most of them are long straight roads and hilly. Anything that is good is about three-four hours north of me. I think it's called Tale of the Dragon, which seems to be pretty popular with most motovloggers...

Hmmm. I still don't think a 600 is a good place to start. But that's your choice to make, and there are lots of people out there who have started on bigger bikes and been fine. So it's not like it's impossible. Just be careful with throttle in the turns until you get the hang of it (smoothness is really the key on a bike). Also, while I'm here, I also think going to a bike store and sitting on a few bikes is a good idea, it helped me a great deal to make my bike decision. It helps you find what you think is comfortable to sit on when riding, and it's what made me decide not to get a fully faired sports bike.
 
Sweet bike, dude! I usually like bikes from another Italian motorcycle maker (Ducati), but this Aprilia is quite lovely. Just wanted to show some love for this motorcycle here. Keep her in good shape and ride smart. 👍

Thank you, will do :D I like Ducati too, wouldn't mind a Panigale :P A friend had a 1098S but he crashed with his mate on a 848, they made a messy sandwich of it :scared:
 
The thing with the 600s is that they are made for power at the top end. They may not do a whole lot (comparatively speaking) until the revs get to 5 digits, and then they want to kill you. A 500 twin makes a great "first" bike because it's strong enough to take on the road (which personally, I don't think a 250 or 300 is) but doesn't have the "I can kill you if you drop your attention or a fraction of a second" mentality.

Yeah the 600s look sportier, they look like race bikes, they are stronger, the suspensions are more versatile, but until you've got some riding experience none of that matters, and you can easily develop truly suck-egg habits.

Start with a used 500 twin, sell it after a year or so of riding it all the time, probably for the same money you paid.

And GEAR UP! Road rash hurts like hell. If it's bad enough they treat it like burns, and it takes that long to recover from. I've been down twice and never lost any skin or blood. I've had to replace boots, gloves, and helmets, but I've never had to be transported, or even had to see a doctor.

Regarding MSF courses: for the basic rider school you use their bikes. Mine was a Kawasaki 125 "cruiser." They will supply a helmet and jacket is you don't have one. (Just Ewwww!) For the experienced rider school you use your own bike.
 
600s are out to kill you, but that shouldn't stop you from buying it as your first bike. I like to think that it's all up to you: how is your state of mind. I'm pretty sure I would've killed myself if I got my bike when I was 18/20 years old. When I think back how I drove my car, 99% sure. The last few years my driving style (and state of mind) got much better and all those bike driving lessons (about 20) really helped. My first bike is a 1000cc v2. Pretty jumpy in low revs but I know this and try to never forget. I probably would have 5 years ago :P
 
Did a ride to Schiphol today. Left when weather was nice and calm but when I arrived at the spotting spot the wind picked up and dark clouds came over. Checked the weather radar and saw it was raining only a few kilometres away. Decided it was best to go home :P Quickly drove to the gas station for a fill-up and coffee. When I got back on the bike it started to rain a little bit, but on the highway I began to outrun the rain. Made it home dry :)

Little bit of pain in the wrists though, guess I still have to get used to it. The ride was around 200km (120miles).
 
Did a ride to Schiphol today. Left when weather was nice and calm but when I arrived at the spotting spot the wind picked up and dark clouds came over. Checked the weather radar and saw it was raining only a few kilometres away. Decided it was best to go home :P Quickly drove to the gas station for a fill-up and coffee. When I got back on the bike it started to rain a little bit, but on the highway I began to outrun the rain. Made it home dry :)

Little bit of pain in the wrists though, guess I still have to get used to it. The ride was around 200km (120miles).
That's about the distance it would take me to get to Atlanta and back as well... Shame we don't have any good spotting spots like Schiphol does. Were relegated to parking decks.
 
Little bit of pain in the wrists though, guess I still have to get used to it. The ride was around 200km (120miles).
I know the bars are low and the bike needs a bit of a tank-hugger position, but try leaning forward at the hips rather than rolling forward in your back, and see how much of your weight you can carry with your legs instead of your arms.

I know my FJR is much more upright, but it's still got a significant forward lean. I tell folks complaining of wrist pain (and hands going to sleep) that if they have to shift their weight to let go of the bars, then they're not sitting correctly. It does take some conscious effort and some getting used to, and I don't know how much you can do with bars that low, so I may be spraying fart-breath as I speak...... :)
 
I know the bars are low and the bike needs a bit of a tank-hugger position, but try leaning forward at the hips rather than rolling forward in your back, and see how much of your weight you can carry with your legs instead of your arms.

I know my FJR is much more upright, but it's still got a significant forward lean. I tell folks complaining of wrist pain (and hands going to sleep) that if they have to shift their weight to let go of the bars, then they're not sitting correctly. It does take some conscious effort and some getting used to, and I don't know how much you can do with bars that low, so I may be spraying fart-breath as I speak...... :)

My hands got sleepy after a 20 minute drive two days ago so I'm looking forward to try this out :)
 
@wfooshee The tip you gave me, it helped! Did an one hour drive today and no sleepy hands at all :D

So today I went to an event, it was a big disappointment. They said big motorcycle dealers would come to show their new bikes but I only saw BMW. The rest were just bikes from people the organizers asked to put it there for display. Some were for sale too.. Saw the new BMW S1000RR and the naked one, the BMW salesman began to talk to me, asked what I had. He asked if I ride on the circuit and said no, he said you can do circuit lessons on a BMW. Of course my interest peaked, asked how much it would cost. The salesman said it was around €200 ($223), but that's not even correct if I would take the lessons on my own bike. On my bike it is €335 ($373) and on a S1000RR €584 ($651). I'll let that one pass :P Saving for a second bike to use purely on the circuit is a better idea to me.
 
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