GT5 Photomode Tutorial - The Lab Method [All Secrets Disclosed]

Discussion in 'GT5 Photo Mode' started by Terronium-12, Jan 25, 2012.

  1. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States
    Hello, folks, first time doing an authentic tutorial around these parts and for the sake of keeping exactly to the point I'll assume you're familiar with level adjustments, sharpening, blur, noise, etc, etc. So I'm just going to jump straight to the action. This will be easy to follow and soon you'll be cranking out better pictures than you were before.

    Okay, let's get started!

    First off, we need a photo from GT5 - how else am I supposed to teach you anything? Mind manipulation? Sorry, don't have the stamina nor the patience for such an activity. Grab some popcorn, a piece of chocolate, a slice of pizza... whatever it is you munch on because I'm about to drop knowledge into your head, or heads, I don't know you... you could be Medusa for all I know.

    ...

    ....

    .....

    ...Someone has stolen my flash drive - Flashy, Flashy... where art thou? Oh, there he is, hiding from me.

    Now, what were we doing? Oh, right, the lab method. Let's load up a picture here:

    [​IMG]
    (all images have a full-sized redirect. Just click the image and BOOM. Full-size.)

    This will do just fine. The Aventador with SV-esque aero mods. Quite the looker, isn't it? Yes, yes it is. And if you haven't noticed already this is a Photoshop tutorial; whether or not you can do this in GIMP (or any other piece of free image editing software) is unbeknownst to me.

    What you want to do now is go to Image > Mode > Lab Color. Just as you're shown in the picture:

    [​IMG]
    See? I told you this would be easy.

    Once you've clicked it (you did click it, right?!) the image should 'blink'. Notice any difference? No? Good, you shouldn't. Not just yet. At this point hit "Ctrl+J" to duplicate the image layer, and you should now have the original "Background Layer" and the new "Layer 1". Leave Layer 1 selected as this will be our guinea pig.

    [​IMG]

    What you do now is hit "Ctrl+M" to bring up the coveted "Curves" window. Before going any further, make sure you have the histogram displaying it's grid in 10% increment adjustments and NOT quarter-tone. Look to the picture for the distinction.

    [​IMG]

    You'll also notice the drop-down menu and the three adjustment parameters: Lightness (don't worry about this now, we'll come back to it later), a channel, and finally, the b channel. The latter two are what you want to focus on upfront as they'll directly control how much more colorfully vibrant your photo becomes.

    ---

    If you're stuck, or scratching your head... now would be the time to re-read and get caught up. Any questions asked will require a $5 surcharge. Per question :p

    ---

    Okay, let's get on to the nitty-gritty, shall we?

    You'll notice that 45-degree angled line crossing through the middle of the histogram - that's where the adjustments will be made. Remember, only drag from the bottom (and top) of the line, not middle, or anywhere else. Top and bottom.

    Say it with me: "Top and bottom". Good. Very good.

    [​IMG]

    You want to drag one end 1-3 spaces, and what you do for one end you must do for the other. If you don't you'll end up with a weird (and possibly scary depending on how sensitive your eyes are) color tint, and no one wants that. As you can see, I adjusted the a channel slider 2 spaces on both ends of the line. Now, we move on to the b channel.

    [​IMG]

    What you did for the a channel you can also do for b, but you don't have to. You can undercut it by 1 (1 space on both ends), or you can do 3 spaces on both ends, however, for the sake of keeping this easy to follow let's mirror what we did for the a channel - 2 spaces on both ends of the line.

    And just as I promised, we're back to the Lightness channel. I won't bother to show any specific picture for this as it's easy enough to understand: the bottom edge of the line controls exposure, and the top lines controls gamma. You can fiddle with both to your heart's content but avoid extremes... otherwise it'll look as if you somehow got close enough, and took a picture of the sun, mid-explosion. Once you're done fiddling around don't forget to finalize the edits by hitting "OK"!

    Now, there are two ways in which you can go about saving this image:

    1. Revert it back to it's original RGB base by going back to Image > Mode, but this time you'll select RGB. You'll then be prompted about changing modes can affect the appearance and whether or not you want to flatten the image, don't flatten the image.

    2. Leave it as, merge the two layers together, and then save it in your format of choice. I personally save my images in PNG-24. Sure, it's a bit hefty in size but I love my PNG's.

    The second option is the more advanced of the two because it limits any further postproduction only to what Lab supports, so it's advised that you do any postproduction preparation beforehand if you go this route. The first option reverts the image back to it's RGB base and as such a little bit of the color vibrancy will be lost in translation. There will be times where the first option is absolutely necessary as the colors will, at times, be far too intense and you'll want some of that vibrancy gone.

    That's it. You're done. Congratulations, you are now a Lv. 2 Photoshop Goblin.

    -----

    In closing, it needs to be pointed out that, like many other methods of advanced postproduction, the Lab method looks it's best when paired with other adjustments. Such as my own personal edit:

    [​IMG]

    Depending on how well received this is, I'll teach you the whole nine yards of how I utilize the Lab method with a far better picture as well. This is too dark for my own liking. Oh yeah, don't mind that subtly-blurred GT logo, I forgot to edit it out the proper way before doing that. :lol:
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  2. Crushed

    Crushed

    Messages:
    970
    Location:
    United States
    Very nice *clap clap clap*
     
  3. mazda787

    mazda787

    Messages:
    3,403
    Location:
    United States
    Great tutorial, thanks for taking the time.
     
  4. jedisteampunk

    jedisteampunk

    Messages:
    1,094
    Location:
    Wales
    Excellent tutorial, bravo.
     
  5. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States
    The following are better examples of how Lab can work wonders for seemingly dull-looking photos that need that little bit extra "oomph". I'll also address how Lab works under differing lighting conditions and color combinations

    Original
    [​IMG]

    Lab Edited (with Levels adjustments; saved in Lab mode)
    [​IMG]

    Original
    [​IMG]

    Lab Edited (with Levels adjustments; saved in Lab mode)
    [​IMG]

    Original
    [​IMG]

    Lab Edited (with Levels adjustments; saved in Lab mode)
    [​IMG]

    Original
    [​IMG]

    Lab Edited (with Levels adjustments; saved in Lab mode)
    [​IMG]
    (Click on any of the images for full-sized comparisons).


    Crushed - *Bows* Thank you. :p

    Mazda787 - My pleasure.

    jedisteampunk - *Bows again* Thanks!


    The advantages of editing in Lab mode should be more evident now then they were in the original example. One thing I neglected to mention, well, mention entirely is that a general rule of thumb is if you decide to go the full extent of 3 spaces you will likely have to re-convert the image back it's base RGB mode as the colors will likely be so vibrant that they'll appear to be bleeding.
     
  6. uMadson?

    uMadson?

    Messages:
    6,055
    Location:
    Philippines
    Interesting. Might as well try this for my next gallery update.
     
  7. Taiga

    Taiga

    Messages:
    2,451
    Location:
    Singapore
    Wanted to create a photoshop guide but since you've beaten me to it, I think I'll not. :p

    Nice guide, simple and understandable. :)
     
  8. grubymike

    grubymike

    Messages:
    464
    Location:
    Poland
    :tup: well done !
     
  9. kogunenjou

    kogunenjou

    Messages:
    302
    Location:
    United States
    What I liked about this was that it wasn't just a thorough tutorial, but it was also quite entertaining. I have a question, though. Are you going to do future tutorials showing more advanced editing techniques such as fades and overlays?

    Like this, for example, which I just whipped up as quickly as I could since I couldn't find the original version:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  10. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States
    I look forward to seeing what you can work up.

    Thanks. You can thank the fan of ceilings himself for encouraging me to do this. I originally wanted to tack this on as an additional bonus to the tutorial he was going to write up, but since he also showed interest in it... here we are.

    Appreciate it! :D


    Like I said, depending on how well-received this is (and it's pretty well-received thus far) I'll do the whole nine yards of the process I go through. So, short answer = Yes.

    And thanks for the comments. It really came natural. :p

    ---

    I'll write up a small update later in the day that shows the steps of what I do; it won't teach you how to do it, but it'll tease you.
     
  11. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States
    Now I'll take you all through the five steps of going from "Bleh" to "Wow!". This is non-inclusive of any additional postproduction done to the image during this process (that will come later), but again, we'll be working with a relatively dark image.

    Let us begin!

    Step 1 - The Base Image
    [​IMG]
    Looks a bit dull, doesn't it? Of course it does.

    Step 2 - Level adjustments
    [​IMG]
    A quick way to get your shot back to it's original state.

    Step 3 - Gaussian Blur and Soft Light Blending
    [​IMG]
    This is a technique that highlights, or rather, boosts the light and dark tones of the image all while softening the image at the same time. I tend to use Soft Light more as opposed to Overlay simply because Overlay tends to bring too much of the darker tones out. It works great if you're going for a surreal mood, or you steadily decrease the opacity; I have the opacity set to 32 there so the advantages aren't as apparent as I would have liked, but as I said before, this is a relatively low-light image, so I had to tone some of it down. Unfortunately.

    Step 4 - The Lab Method
    [​IMG]
    You didn't think this would go without a mention, did you? What do you think this thread is about? Read the title, fool!

    Step 5 - Lab Balance
    [​IMG]
    Lab Balance? What the heck is that, stop making stuff up! I assure you I am not. You're simply adjust the color balance while in Lab mode. The difference being, unlike in RGB where you have a separate Red, Blue, and Green channel, in Lab mode you have Green and Magenta (on one slider), and Blue and Yellow (on the second and last slider). This is a great way to cast an artistic color tint/tinge on your image and bring out colors that aren't as pronounced as you'd want them to be. Again, avoid extremes, otherwise it'll look like you threw a wad of C4 into the ocean and it exploded... Next to several fish. And that's just...that's just cruel.​
     
  12. Turtle

    Turtle

    Messages:
    2,227
    Location:
    United States
    In your tutorial (which I will try tomorrow), you mentioned removing the GT watermark. I've been wondering how to do that properly, can you please help me out?

    ~
    Turtle [​IMG]
     
  13. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States
    Sure. I'm certain someone did a tutorial on that already that you can look at.

    I'll see if I can find it for you. If I can't, I'll add it in tomorrow.
     
  14. Turtle

    Turtle

    Messages:
    2,227
    Location:
    United States
    Haha, nevermind I found it, sorry.

    ~Turtle [​IMG]
     
  15. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States
    Not a problem.

    I had no success finding it. Glad you did. :lol:
     
  16. Turtle

    Turtle

    Messages:
    2,227
    Location:
    United States
    One more thing, do I have permission to post pictures in here showing how they came out? I actually tried it from one of my earlier shots.

    ~Turtle [​IMG]
     
  17. SHDante

    SHDante

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    United States
    They look excellent and I like how the XJR-9 picture came out as a result. Well done. :tup:
     
  18. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States

    Sure thing. I encourage it.


    Thanks. This method is only half of the entire effort though.
     
  19. SHDante

    SHDante

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    United States
    Thanks. This method is only half of the entire effort though.[/QUOTE]
    I look forward to the full effort. :)
     
  20. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States
    Okay ladies and gentlemen, I have returned for yet another installment in my fantastical Lab Method tutorial, and this time I'll walk you through much of the entire process (I do have to maintain some of my secrets, wouldn't you say?) I go through when editing a photo in Lab mode. Let's begin because quite frankly I'm a bit fatigued and am likely to fall asleep any moment now, so if you see a bunch of incoherent text it's because my head is on the keyboard.

    And, no, I'm not dead. I'll be asleep. No need to bother the paramedics.


    -----

    Part 1 - Levels

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Once again we start with the base image, and once again, all forthcoming images have a full-sized redirect - just click on the image and BOOM, full-sized. So, we have our base image, now what do we do? First off, take a good look at your keyboard. Now, blow a kiss at it... you know you want to, and don't make this weird either... just blow a kiss at it. Now that that's out of the way, hit "Ctrl+L" to bring up the Levels adjustment window; from here you'll be able to tone the image to mirror it's appearance when you originally took the photo. It takes a bit of practice to get it just right, and not only to get it just right, but to know where the ideal places are for the three tone adjustments and knowing where to avoid.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    (Image on the left is the original, and this will continue throughout the remaining two examples.)

    First up, we have the white eyedropper (to the far right, I forgot to circle it!). This allows you to boost (or thin, depending on where you click) white levels. Where I clicked is outlined by the black arrow and you'll notice, compared to the base image, that there's now a slightly apparent blue (or is that magenta?) tinge, and that's perfectly fine. That's what we want... for the white eyedropper to boost/highlight tones that have been dulled out in translation coming from GT5, to your flash drive, and to PS.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Now we come to the black eyedropper (to the far left, once again I forgot to circle it!). This allows you to boost (or significantly darken, depending on where you click) black levels. It also has to potential to thin out black levels much like the white eyedropper, however, it needs to be pointed out that exactly like the white (and gray) eyedroppers, if you click anywhere that is not immediately white, black, or grey, then one of two things will happen:

    1. In the case of the black eyedropper, the surrounding tones will become significantly darker - as in, if you were to mistake black for what is actually dark gray.

    2. Alternatively, if you click on an area that's on the lighter side of the spectrum (i.e. white) the surrounding tones will, well, explode - as if, once again, you were somehow able to take a picture of the sun whilst it was exploding. What is with you and the sun?! Stay. Away. From the sun.

    Where I clicked is outlined by the black arrow, and now you'll notice the surrounding tones have darkened up a bit (look at the grass or the tree). This is also good.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Finally, we come to the gray eyedropper. You have a bit more flexibility with the gray eyedropper because you're essentially aiming for off-white tones, it doesn't have to be gray. Possible spots are outlined by the arrows, but be sure adhere to the two warnings above (in case you feel like experimenting) because they apply here as well, not in the same manner though. Play around with it and see what I mean. Don't worry about unsightly tints because you can uncheck "Preview", find a spot that is off-white, turn "Preview" back on and click there. If that doesn't work, rinse and repeat.

    Troubleshooting

    Q: I have the Levels window open, but when I click on a white area I see no apparent change. Have I done something wrong?

    A: Not at all. You won't always notice a change unless you're attempting to go for an artistic feel and fill the channel with a color that is blatantly not pure white. This applies to the other two channels as well.

    Q: Uh... I've clicked on the white eyedropper and it isn't changing anything. I've even clicked on other areas in the image, and still notice there's no change, not even a tint. What am I doing wrong?

    A: This happens at times, I think it has something to do with either Photoshop's allocated resources (something has gone awry), or general computational load. All you have to do is cancel out of the Levels window and click on, say, the sky and if it changes to a dark or light blue tint you're back in business. From there you disable preview, find an appropriate white spot, enable preview and click it. Problem solved.

    This closes out on Part 1. I'm famished, and need to masticate (I know someone is going to misread that!).​
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2012
  21. Turtle

    Turtle

    Messages:
    2,227
    Location:
    United States
    Hahaha......You were correct... :ouch:
    ~Turtle [​IMG]
     
  22. SVX

    SVX Premium

    Messages:
    14,258
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Excellent tutorials, will use them. :tup: Thank you for taking the time to do these. :cheers:
     
  23. Evolvedsoul

    Evolvedsoul

    Messages:
    1,140
    Location:
    Canada
    Well, I'm subscribed! :tup:
     
  24. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States
    Hah. Pervert. :lol:


    No problem at all, and thank you!


    Much appreciated! :D

    ---

    Tomorrow, Part 2!
     
  25. Turtle

    Turtle

    Messages:
    2,227
    Location:
    United States
    I swear I only thought that for a split second! :scared:

    Lookin' forward to it. :tup:

    Edit: I'm working on my next gallery update that will use this method right now, so it'll be just a few days until it's updated.

    ~Turtle [​IMG]
     
  26. Techy

    Techy

    Messages:
    6,777
    Location:
    United States
    Incredible tutorial, matey. It will suit quite useful for my pictures. Subscribed, and thank you for your efforts :tup:
     
  27. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States
    Part 1 of the in-depth tutorial came to close after adjusting the levels of the photo to bring a bit of life back into it. Let's get the ball rolling again with Part 2, and this time I'm not drowsy or anything (although I am quite hungry), so let's just jump right back into the action.

    ARE YOU READY?

    Why am I shouting? Terribly sorry.

    ---

    Part 2 - Blending and Cleanup

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    We have our leveled photo but now what do we do? Tell me I need to know! You'll want to hit "Ctrl+J" to duplicate the layer, and then head on over to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur, just as shown in the image above. Did you click it? Click it, fool! The Gaussian Blur window will now come up and you'll notice that your image is already blurred with a radius of 5 (I believe that's the default but I can't be absolutely positive), and that's good because you want a range of 5 up to 10; just enough to blur the image without hiding any of the image's details... as in if you set the radius to 20 - don't do that. I see you eying the slider.

    You'll notice I set the radius to 7.5 because I'm a bit reckless like that, and I like the subtlety because even though it's blurred I can still see everything. You can play with the entire range; you can even start from 1 (or 2, not sure there is a '1') and work your way up to the heavier blurring. But remember, going beyond 10 risks the image being too heavily blurred and you losing significant environmental detail.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    You have that done and now I bet you're wondering why you have a duplicate layer, aren't you? Of course you are... don't lie. I know. You have that duplicate layer because you're about to perform an incredibly awesome technique, and that technique is called "Blending". Blending? But I don't have a blender, and why I'm blending an intangible object? You're weird... go sit in the corner and put that special hat on. For everyone else, the blending mode in layman's terms is the combination of two images that changes the ways the two layers interact with each other. Cycle through the available blends and you'll see exactly what I mean.

    Wowed yet? Good, now go back to "Soft Light" and select that. For this image I didn't adjust the opacity (the adjustment directly to the right of the blend menu) as I liked it just as it were at 100% opacity. Now, merge the two images together by right-clicking anywhere in the selected layer and select "Flatten Image".

    You should instantly notice how much livelier your image has become. Fantastic, isn't it? Yes, I know it is.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    You'll want to head back over to the Filter menu and this go for Sharpen > Smart Sharpen. I used this in every one of my works. I like the control you have in SS, and you can even identify (and eliminate) Gaussian, Lens, and Motion blur with this sharpening tool. Right now, we'll be focusing on eliminating any access motion blur. Why? To be perfectly honest with you, I don't have a definitive reason; that's not to imply there isn't one... I just don't have one of my own. For the sake of this tutorial (and so you won't be scratching your head afterwards) the reason will be to "smooth" out the motion blur on the environmental details. Let's carry onward...

    ...Once you've clicked on Smart Sharpen the appropriate window should pop up and you'll be greeted with two sliders, a "Remove" menu (pertaining to three methods of blur mentioned earlier), and a radius line graph (within a circle). What you want to do here is leave the two sliders at the default 100% and 1.0 px (pixels) and focus your attention on the "Remove" drop-down menu. Click on that and select Motion Blur and set the angle to 20-degrees (this is to direct the angle of removal either away from or with the flow of the original blur). Don't forget to tick the "More Accurate" box before finalizing the adjustments. You can use that at your own discretion, but since this particular tool is a bit CPU-intensive, selecting "More Accurate" processes the file more slowly allowing for a greater detail of blur to be removed - hence, "more accurate". You didn't think I'd instruct you to do something without giving you a reason, did you?

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    (Don't mind that the display image isn't in Photoshop. I saved it as an external image... for some reason.)

    Now, we come to a bonus step. Look at any of the full-sized images; do you notice that nasty bit of pixelized horror underneath (or rather, hugging) a bit of the rear bumper? If you hadn't noticed it before... that's okay, click on the image above and see it. In any case, that's because of the dirt/gravel particles. GT5, or rather, the PS3 has no way of supporting AF (Anisotropic Filtering), so we'll have to clean it up ourselves using the handy-dandy (no, not notebook... this isn't Blues Clues!) Smudge Tool!

    Find the Smudge Tool; it's right underneath the Paint Bucket/Gradient Tool, and the default selection is the Blur Tool (looks like a tear/raindrop), click on that and look for the "pointing finger"... that's the Smudge Tool. Click it! You see that area highlighted by the circle? You'll want to take the tool (take note of the settings in the images below) and move it across the affected area - make sure you're holding the left mouse button while doing this - and you'll notice it's going away. It'll take a bit of practice to get it right assuming you don't have steady hands but it's really easy fix (in this image anyway).


    And this is what you come up with! Doesn't that look 9,000 times better?

    ...What's that you say - there's no image above? Ah... That's likely due to me remembering this step after I had already done it! The cleaned up effort is in every single image up to this point. :lol:

    This closes out Part 2. Tomorrow, Part 3!​
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  28. Turtle

    Turtle

    Messages:
    2,227
    Location:
    United States
    Well, I was about to update my gallery, but then I saw that you added part two and I decided to see if it made any different. Boy, did it make a difference. I can't wait for part 3!
    ~Turtle [​IMG]
     
  29. Terronium-12

    Terronium-12 Moderator

    Messages:
    26,609
    Location:
    United States
    Alright then, after a bit of a delay (you can thank Top Gear, Project CARS, and my addiction to Gundam for that) we've finally come to the finale; that's right, this is Part 3 of my extra-special, supercalifragilisticexpialidocious (if you don't know from where this reference originates you're too young) tutorial on the Lab Method. So, I want no tears or anyone showing up at my door with a package of cookies thanking m--you know, on second thought... do bring me cookies. I love cookies. Especially Pepperidge Farm's Verona.

    ---

    Part 3 - In Mother Russia you are the Lab Method

    An alternative title would have been "The Crystal, er, uh, The Lab Method" but I doubt anyone would have gotten the reference there. Let us carry on with the festivities.

    [​IMG]

    Here we have the titular Lab Method. For the walkthrough see here!

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    We're going to discuss the final postproduction process now - Lab Balance. You remember me mentioning this some time ago? It's a fairly simple process; while still in Lab mode simply hit "Ctrl+B" and you'll be greeted with the Color Balance window. From here you should take immediate notice of the three available channels (in order from left to right): Shadows, Midtones, and Highlights. These three channels will allow you to adjust the color tones of exactly what the three channels describe themselves as. This is a bit of a trial and error process as it involves tweaking things just right - no more, no less. Feel free to experiment to your hearts content (notice the distinct lack of the traditional Red, Blue, and Green channels as pointed out before), but remember to deselect (and then reselect) the "Preview" box to see your before and after progress to know where you stand, and once you have a good enough idea of what you want, cancel out of the window and hit "Ctrl+B" again to open up a new Color Balance window... or you can just reset the sliders back to "0".

    You can begin with any channel you wish. It doesn't matter. There's no method to this madness. You don't even have to use all three channels, hell, you don't even have to use both sliders on any given channel... but we're getting ahead of ourselves, let's stick to the plan. You'll notice I'm beginning with Midtones, and instantly, even without looking at the numbers I've assigned to each slider, you can tell a difference between the last progress photo and this one; the balanced photo has a wider wider range, or rather, a deeper range of colors. The grass/gravel has a darker tone, the headlamps are of a subtle brightness and vibrancy, and sky's reflection off the left-hand side of the rear window is also far more noticeable than it were beforehand. Moving on to Shadows you should now notice that the grass/gravel is now a bit more dark than before, no thanks to the low values used for the shadows. I kept it subtle so I wouldn't end up tinting the image or drowning the colors out in a bleeding outcry. You're definitely encouraged to go further and see what happens, but be sure to record your settings beforehand so you'll know what to fall back on.

    The finished image should look like this (for the sake of this tutorial):

    [​IMG]

    That's it, folks. This brings this tutorial to a close. I may return in the future to share more of my tips and tricks, but until then... I bid you adieu.​
     
  30. Walkinshaw

    Walkinshaw

    Messages:
    540
    Great work on the tutorial.:tup:
    I was planning a similar one but yours covers it really well.
    (I like the humour too!)

    There are lots of good photos posted in these threads that could do with a little bit of editing to make them fantastic.
    I know that an "in game" shot is the most honest but when they are posted beside edited pics they don't really look that good!.

    I'm predicting the quality of pics to rise a notch or two, now that your tutorial explains how to get the best out of each pic. :)