Total noob... where do I start?

5
Canada
Canada
Hello, I've been Googling this but it seems it's difficult getting a straight answer. I am a total noob to any racing game, and have finally grown weary of Battlefield so bought a wheel and GT Sport (and I have Project Cars 2 from when it was on sale... free?).

I am not sure where to start in GT Sport. Like, which modes should I focus on to start? I started beginner races in the GT League of Campaign mode last night. Is that good? What is Arcade mode? Maybe I'm overcomplicating things...

Any other tips are appreciated. Thanks!
 

Famine

GTP Editor, GTPEDIA Author
Administrator
73,743
United Kingdom
Rule 12
GTP_Famine
Hello, I've been Googling this but it seems it's difficult getting a straight answer.
Well... you won't here either :D That's largely because there isn't one; it really depends on the individual.
I am a total noob to any racing game, and have finally grown weary of Battlefield so bought a wheel and GT Sport (and I have Project Cars 2 from when it was on sale... free?).

I am not sure where to start in GT Sport. Like, which modes should I focus on to start? I started beginner races in the GT League of Campaign mode last night. Is that good? What is Arcade mode? Maybe I'm overcomplicating things...
Ultimately, GT Sport doesn't have any kind of structure to it; there's the levelling system, sure, but there's no obvious start or end point, and no real path through it to 100%. Older GT games had a defined career mode where you'd buy a crap car, race it a bit in low-level races, tune it up to go faster, then get a better car for higher level races... lather, rinse, repeat. GT Sport doesn't.

If you're totally new to GT (or even racing games) it would be worth starting with the Licence tests, Circuit Experience, and Mission Challenge, in roughly that order. The licences basically clue you in on how to drive cars (to a certain extent). Circuit Experience, though it uses some pretty quick machinery (Gr.3 for the most part; basically GT3 race cars), teaches you where all the various tracks go (except for the reverse layouts, which is odd), and Mission Challenge puts you through various racing (usually) scenarios. The later ones are full on races too.

They also have the benefit that progressing through these things gives you lots of money, XP, Mileage Points, and free cars.

GT League is sort of like old GT, but a little on the light side. There's four levels (which you need to unlock by advancing your player level) which range from five-minute races in slower cars in Beginner League up to hour-long Gr.1 (basically Le Mans cars) events in the Endurance League... but you don't really need to "progress" through them so much. They're just all open when you hit the right level and you can pick a car and go racing.

Arcade Mode is basically inconsequential racing. You pick a track, pick a car, pick a difficulty level (beginner, intermediate, professional), the game picks AI opponents and you do the race. None of it really means anything, but you get money, XP, and Mileage Points from it. Usually not much of the first two. You can also pick "custom race" which is the same thing but you can set some of the conditions, including the type of car (or set it to One Make to force it into the same car you use) that the AI uses.

The "core" of GT Sport is Sport Mode, which is competitive, ranked online racing. You'll need to watch two videos before you start, but when you start racing online you'll probably find nobody paid the slightest attention to, like, any of it.
 
5
Canada
Canada
Well... you won't here either :D That's largely because there isn't one; it really depends on the individual.

Ultimately, GT Sport doesn't have any kind of structure to it; there's the levelling system, sure, but there's no obvious start or end point, and no real path through it to 100%. Older GT games had a defined career mode where you'd buy a crap car, race it a bit in low-level races, tune it up to go faster, then get a better car for higher level races... lather, rinse, repeat. GT Sport doesn't.

If you're totally new to GT (or even racing games) it would be worth starting with the Licence tests, Circuit Experience, and Mission Challenge, in roughly that order. The licences basically clue you in on how to drive cars (to a certain extent). Circuit Experience, though it uses some pretty quick machinery (Gr.3 for the most part; basically GT3 race cars), teaches you where all the various tracks go (except for the reverse layouts, which is odd), and Mission Challenge puts you through various racing (usually) scenarios. The later ones are full on races too.

They also have the benefit that progressing through these things gives you lots of money, XP, Mileage Points, and free cars.

GT League is sort of like old GT, but a little on the light side. There's four levels (which you need to unlock by advancing your player level) which range from five-minute races in slower cars in Beginner League up to hour-long Gr.1 (basically Le Mans cars) events in the Endurance League... but you don't really need to "progress" through them so much. They're just all open when you hit the right level and you can pick a car and go racing.

Arcade Mode is basically inconsequential racing. You pick a track, pick a car, pick a difficulty level (beginner, intermediate, professional), the game picks AI opponents and you do the race. None of it really means anything, but you get money, XP, and Mileage Points from it. Usually not much of the first two. You can also pick "custom race" which is the same thing but you can set some of the conditions, including the type of car (or set it to One Make to force it into the same car you use) that the AI uses.

The "core" of GT Sport is Sport Mode, which is competitive, ranked online racing. You'll need to watch two videos before you start, but when you start racing online you'll probably find nobody paid the slightest attention to, like, any of it.

Wow, thanks for that. Exactly the kind of information I was hoping to find.
 
1,057
United States
Phoenix, AZ
MonyB
Wow, thanks for that. Exactly the kind of information I was hoping to find.

Also, to add to all the good info Famine gave you - when you do the mission challenges and GT League, be careful about developing bad habits. The offline mode does not enforce track limits or contact penalties, Sport Mode does. It is very easy during some of the more challenging missions to push past the AI, if not flat out slam into them to stop your sideways momentum, simply because you can. I think a lot of people enter Sports Mode with this mentality developed by learning the game from the offline campaign. Challenge yourself to learn how to race cleanly and under control and when you enter the online world, you'll be miles ahead of the other noobs.
 
5
Canada
Canada
Also, to add to all the good info Famine gave you - when you do the mission challenges and GT League, be careful about developing bad habits. The offline mode does not enforce track limits or contact penalties, Sport Mode does. It is very easy during some of the more challenging missions to push past the AI, if not flat out slam into them to stop your sideways momentum, simply because you can. I think a lot of people enter Sports Mode with this mentality developed by learning the game from the offline campaign. Challenge yourself to learn how to race cleanly and under control and when you enter the online world, you'll be miles ahead of the other noobs.

Thanks for this... I was wondering about making contact with other drivers. In offline mode I have noticed that I collide with other cars to gain an advantage around corners, and wondered how this worked in online mode (which I have been too fearful to try as of yet lol).
 
1,057
United States
Phoenix, AZ
MonyB
Thanks for this... I was wondering about making contact with other drivers. In offline mode I have noticed that I collide with other cars to gain an advantage around corners, and wondered how this worked in online mode (which I have been too fearful to try as of yet lol).

Online, the collision may or may not trigger a penalty - there's a lot involved but the system itself is pretty crappy and somewhat inconsistent. What will definitely happen is you will anger the other driver. Worst case scenario, it's a short-tempered driver and now you have someone hunting you down the rest of the race.

It also may be helpful to subscribe to some YT channels. There's quite a few GTS content creators. They'll help you learn the different tracks, as well as racing etiquette.
 
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3,997
United States
Nor Cal
sturk0167
Thanks for this... I was wondering about making contact with other drivers. In offline mode I have noticed that I collide with other cars to gain an advantage around corners, and wondered how this worked in online mode (which I have been too fearful to try as of yet lol).
I've been doing the online Sport Mode for about 3 years.
Here's the truth about racing against real people:
If you hit another car in order to pass them, the response depends on the type of person you hit, and whether they thought it was intentional.

About 20% of the people take the moral high ground, and won't hit you back at all.
Another 30% will definitely hit you back no matter what.
Another 30% are gonna assume it was accidental, because maybe you braked a bit too late. They will put you on probation, meaning it's zero tolerance, going forward. (This is the category I'm in, unless I'm alongside another car on a straight and they shove me off the track. In that case, intent is obvious, and I unload with both barrels.)
The last 20% is just random. It kinda depends on their mood, or if they've already been getting beat up by others, of if they're sober.
The percentages may be a little off, but they're close.

You can pacify some people and create a little good will by letting off your throttle, and letting the other car have their position back. That's how you apologize during a race.
Also, just say you're sorry in the post-race chat. :guilty: It goes a long ways with a lot of the racers.

As far as feeling uneasy about entering Sport Mode races, that's probably typical.
I felt the same way at first, and sometimes still get a little anxious when entering a race. I think it's mostly worrying about getting crushed by the competition. After entering the same race a couple times, you'll know how you measure up, and be more at ease. Beer helps with that, too. :cheers:
 
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638
United States
Bedford, Indiana
tmsheehan
Thanks for this... I was wondering about making contact with other drivers. In offline mode I have noticed that I collide with other cars to gain an advantage around corners, and wondered how this worked in online mode (which I have been too fearful to try as of yet lol).

In offline mode you will learn quickly how the AI act but I recommend you practice proper driving while racing offline. It can be hard at times with the idiotic style of racing the AI does (like braking at EVERY corner) but it will help you be a better racer once you go online.

OR . . .

Take the bumping and banging online (because a lot of others will do it around you) and disregard your DR and SR to go for the win. Since you asked for help I don't think that is you.

Before the negative comments start let me remind everyone that there is a separate thread talking the awesome penalty system and I did say "a lot" not "most" or "all". There are "a lot" of awesome drivers who do race properly AND have very good DR & SR ratings.

Back to @astroboy314, in my humble opinion remember this is only a game so enjoy your racing.
 
160
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
neil_1980
You've already got loads of great advice above... but I'd highly recommend when you do make the leap to online you practice that circuit and car as much as you can before racing.

It may not be completely necessary but if you can gold the circuit experience for that track and if you're doing the daily race do say 30-60+ minutes until you're lapping consistently you wont go too far wrong (the faster your time trial time the further up the grid you'll start and the consistency will help massively for the race distance).

Main thing though if/when you do race online is to try and race as clean as possible to build your SR ranking... as a rule the higher you get it the cleaner the races you'll have.

Above all though don't build up a fear or anything to racing online. I disliked it at the start due to a few bad races so only played GT sport offline for years... I only started with the online during lockdown 1 and its been a blast (other than an annoying penalty system which you'll soon find out about) and wish I'd done it sooner