TT Tuning

Discussion in 'TT Tuning, Settings and Riding Form' started by guska, Jun 3, 2006.

  1. Super T

    Super T

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    If your set-up guides for bikes are as good as your car ones I'm all for it Scaff. :tup:
     
  2. MarinaDiamandis

    MarinaDiamandis Premium

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    Count me in. Sounds like a great idea.
     
  3. adifferentname

    adifferentname

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    Sounds good to me :tup:
     
  4. Chris Criswell

    Chris Criswell

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    Yeah, changing the Riding Form makes the most changes in terms of handling from what I have experienced.
     
  5. kaede

    kaede

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    I'm for the idea but don't think will be able to contribute since my timings are nowhere near those in the Lap Times sub forum.
     
  6. hucker696

    hucker696

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    I don't think the time will mattrer,what poeple will want is the effects of adjustments of the bike and ride,and how it effects the ride.
     
  7. guska

    guska Premium

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    Well I'm all for the idea. As SuperT commented, if you half as good at tuning a bike as you are a car, then it has to be good.
     
  8. matski

    matski

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    Have you guys been playing around with you 'riding form' too...

    I can imagine the TT physics engine being quite clever, and your riding form settings having quite an effect on weight shift etc.

    PS... i'd be in favour of some kind of tuning forum/colaborative settings guide.
     
  9. gregc

    gregc

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    1,039
    Count me in for another vote in favour of a settings/tuning sub-forum. I wouldn't be able to contribute much at the moment (still getting started with TT) but I'm completely lost on the mysteries of bike tuning and rider form, so a discussion of it would be immensely helpful :)
     
  10. McArthurBR

    McArthurBR

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    A TT tuning guide would be amazing... I have no idea about what can I do to make the bikes better to drive.
     
  11. The Uncreated

    The Uncreated

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    Two words -- Prima Guide.

    Uncreated
     
  12. Scaff

    Scaff Staff Emeritus

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    Which if anything like the GT4 guides are not worth it, the poor tuning (and often incorrect) information is what prompted me to write my GT4 tuning guides (which I am yet to see bettered for detail).

    I am currently in the process of testing and planning a TT tuning guide.

    Regards

    Scaff
     
  13. Super T

    Super T

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    Location:
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    :tup:

    I wish I had half your dedication Scaff. Hope to see some of those guides soon.

    Darren.
     
  14. hucker696

    hucker696

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    351
    Prima Guides are ok for the pics and track lists but thats about it.
     
  15. Scaff

    Scaff Staff Emeritus

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    OK guys you got the tuning, settings and riding form sub-forum so let see it put to good use.


    Regards

    Scaff


    BTW - Yes I am working on a TT specific tuning guide its going well at the moment, but any and all feedback on set-ups and tuning you can add to this thread and/or info on riding form (in the existing thread on that) will help me out massively.
     
  16. mariacci

    mariacci

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    well if tuning this game is like a life like racing bike i would think this...
    it depends on how you would ride, are you a late braker, early apexer, more of a wide arc corning person. etc....
    myself i am a point shoot meaning i find a point and aim, not much of a big arc which sucks for two strokes.
    the braking balance i have found for my preference to turn the rear brake to 1 becaues i like to brake and turn, bikes do not turn and brake... similar to a car.
    the preload essentially is ride height. If you crank the preload up on the front the bike will steer slowly. so a fast turner would have a low front and a higher rear, it makes the bike twitchy but it will turn quicker. a person wanting a stable turning radius would have to find an equal, maybe making the front closer to the rear.
    rebound is always set according to the compression and then based on spring rate. If your guy is lite then have a lower spring rate, start with the compression and rebound similar but don't be afraid to raise the rebound higher than the compression. If the rebound on the front is too high, when you let off the brakes mid corner the bike will continue straight for example.
    As far as gear ratios you want to use 4th, 5th and 6th mostly if possible so set up for that.
    I am not a TT pro but that is my simple view based on racing a real bike compared to this game.
     
  17. [empty space]

    [empty space]

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    i dont see how people can use high front brake settings. any higher than 5 or 6 and the bike doesnt turn in if i trail brake and doesnt seem to stop any faster.

    i usually have the brakes set at 5/4 and use the front brake and engine braking to slow me down the only use both brakes for fast corners like 130r or most of motegi.
     
  18. mariacci

    mariacci

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    majority of braking should be done vertically. Then if you are still too hot you can apply small amount of rear and also let off and apply small amounts of front brake.
    Just like during a race, you have strong front brake, too strong of grab and you will tuck (which tt will not do... :( ) so for trail braking if you are in to that just let off of the lever. Most of the time if you are concentrating on braking that much you are not worrying about getting on the throttle which is the secret to going faster.
    But 130r at suzuka is a different turn for sure. Too strong of a brake setting can be tricky for that turn to maximize, but i beleive that if you lower your brake setting you are screwing yourself for the rest of the track just to make .1 second up in that turn. Thats my .02
     
  19. [empty space]

    [empty space]

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    i try to scrub most of my speed before i enter a corner, but, i still need to trailbrake to the apex because if i dont the front wheel doesnt stay online. and when i start to roll on the throttle, every bike understeers. i guess its just my riding style.
     
  20. Knee Dragger

    Knee Dragger

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    Do you untuck the rider when you brake? If not, that could also be causing you to trail brake a bit more than you need to since the rider's body isn't helping slow the bike down.

    I do that so that I slow down enough to get minimal trail braking for the corner, unless I time it wrong and overshoot my planned turn in point due to either braking late or having worn tires. At first I couldn't understand why I would overshoot when I'd brake for turns, then I realized it might help if I let go of the tuck button when braking hard. I dunno if you already do that, but I admit to taking a little while to figure that out...thankfully I learned it during license testing rather than in races.
     
  21. [empty space]

    [empty space]

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    with the way i hold the controller, i cant stay tucked and downshift at the same time. i use my index fingers to operate all four shoulder buttons while my middle fingers support the controller. purhapes i should sit my 5'4 dani up straighter?
     
  22. The Uncreated

    The Uncreated

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    I couldn't survive with those brake settings. Most tracks, I'm at 9 or 10 for front and 8 or 7 for rear.

    Uncreated
     
  23. Knee Dragger

    Knee Dragger

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    That'll definitely help. I put my rider at 5'8" (I rounded up from 5' 7 1/2", heheh) and I set it so that he's sitting as low as he can be when not tucked, but he still sits up enough to cause resistance, and his arms are at about 45-50 degrees and whichever side the corner is on his knee sticks out a decent amount, all when not tucked. This way he can still break plenty of air to help slow the bike down but not overdo it by sitting up like he's riding a horse--I just have to remind myself to let go of the tuck button when I start braking or the braking force is all brakes, which usually doens't work out too well when you need to go from 130 to 40 in a jiffy. If your rider is 5'4" and you have him doing something similar to my rider as far as the sitting height position goes, you probably should do like you said and make him sit up straighter when he's not tucked, that way you can get what little body there is breaking up some air to help slow you down.

    I used to do the same thing you are talking about with the triggers, but games like Metal Gear Solid series and this game actually made me have to learn to use both fingers. I still mostly use my index fingers on all of them, but if I need to downshift while tucked I slide my middle finger up to hold the tuck button and then shift and move my index finger back down so that L2 never lifts. It took getting used to, but since I rarely find myself downshifting while tucked in I don't use it a lot. Your last two fingers are pretty weak in general, but if you try getting into the habit of having both fingers up on the triggers (which I think I really only do for this game and MGS games), you'll get used to it and it won't feel like you're going to drop the controller.:idea: :dopey::tup: Just be glad the DS2 has big L2 and R2 buttons...can you imagine how much harder it would be with digital control-sized bottom triggers?

    Uncreated, do you brake at the absolute last moment before you have to turn? Those brakes must have some serious bite. I wonder if they'll factor in brake fading in the next GT and TT?
     
  24. The Uncreated

    The Uncreated

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    I brake late for hairpins and somewhat earlier for gradual bends that require some braking. Most times I feather my brakes (I use my index and middle fingers on the shape buttons), but in particularly slow hairpins where I need to apply more than 70 percent front brake pressure, the aformentioned bite does cause me to endo a lot.

    Uncreated
     
  25. cory101

    cory101

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    232 mph!!! boom baby! on the ring with the 7 star honda!
     
  26. [empty space]

    [empty space]

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    Scaff - hows the tuning/form guide coming along?
     
  27. The Uncreated

    The Uncreated

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    Personally I was thinking the few of us "over there" that wring the hell out of the game should knock heads and come up with something deep -- make something amounting to a scientific exploration into the finer aspects of all tuning. Seeing as we push the game to its absolute limit, what more qualified set of players could there possibly be?

    Sometime in the near future I'll launch a thread to get the ball rolling -- or rather continue to let it roll.

    Uncreated
     
  28. [empty space]

    [empty space]

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    true, but, no one seems to actually know what things do but seem to be able to make things better with adjustments :confused:

    haha.
     
  29. Sideways_Skinny

    Sideways_Skinny

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    the setting for each bike will be different. there isnt any real guideline as a generalization for each bike. for instance, the kawasaki zx10, imo prefers a stiff set up. while (on another board) im racing the cbr600rr rm, and for infineon i had a really soft setup, like springs at 1 in the front, and 2 in the back. and the preload was 4 in the front and 6 in the back, the damping was rebound: 2f, and 3r, and the compression was: 1f and 2 rear. but at suzuka, on the same bike i run the springs at 7 in the front and 8 in the rear, obviously much more damping as well. so not only does the settings change from bike to bike, but also from track to track, on the same bike.
     
  30. andysd

    andysd

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    Is TT realistic in that the rider must countersteer? I'll buy it if it is realistic in that respect. If it's like steering a car, forget it.