Formula 1 2016 F1 Constructor tech info/development thread. (READ 1ST POST)

Discussion in 'Motorsport' started by LMSCorvetteGT2, Dec 12, 2015.

  1. LMSCorvetteGT2

    LMSCorvetteGT2

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    So after a easily predicted 2015 season winner in the constructor category (and arguably the WDC one) it is now time to collectively join again (which is already being done). And once again bring info, news, trades and development as well as the circus drama together to see who will be crowned as the 2016 WCC winner. <- My bet a certain Silver car under a German moniker.

    So what's really important to know for those who don't know the technical side of F1 and what adjustments to the rule book among other things may prove to be a leading cause to one team winning over all others?

    For starters tires, engine homologation and distribution to customer team, and probably the build up to the 2017 season where much bigger changes will be seen.

    For those curious of the changes to this season read the info from the spoiler tag below

    Power Units
    In 2016 as things sit at the moment Formula 1 teams will be allowed to use five power units per driver, an increase on the four allowed in 2015. The reason for this increase is the introduction of Azerbaijan and the return of Germany to a 21 race calendar. As it stands, this will actually make life easier for the engine builders as the life requirement of each power unit will go down slightly compared to 2015. Significantly, however, if only a single race drops off the calendar (and the US GP is looking to be struggling) then the allocation reverts to just four power units and an increase in the life requirement of each power unit. This will be creating something of a headache for the engine gurus at Mercedes, Ferrari, Honda and Renault (and Red Bull now) as they work out the life for each component. With five power units and 21 races, each unit will have to last for about 1,250km of racing mileage (note that this figure does not include free practice or qualifying) but with only twenty races each unit would have to last 1,500km. It may seem a small difference but – as Nico Rosberg showed when he pushed his ageing engine a little too far at Monza - once practice sessions are taken into account it could be a critical difference.

    Interestingly the regulations also make life a little easier for new power unit suppliers. In its first season a new manufacturer gets an extra unit added to its allocation, something Honda probably would have liked in 2015, while they also get a slightly more generous token spend.

    Every power unit used in 2016 must be homologated by the end of February, which means in reality the development work must be complete and signed off before the start of winter testing as a design dossier has to be delivered to the FIA on Valentine's Day. This means that the power units must be finalised before they have ever been run on track, it is clear that the FIA engine department does not want the power unit engineers to have an easy winter!

    Crucially changes can be made after the deadline for reasons of cost, safety and reliability, and in season performance development will also continue within the token structure.

    It will now also be possible for old specification power units to be re-homologated for use by specific teams, in other words, Toro Rosso can use a 2015 Ferrari power unit in 2016 while Haas, Sauber and the works team will use the latest spec units.


    Testing
    In terms of testing, firstly power unit suppliers are now banned from private testing using cars built to the 2012-2016 technical regulations. In 2015 it would have been possible for a power unit supplier to use a car designed to the F1 regulations but not owned by a team (for example the Perinn) to test.

    Additionally, up to twelve days of in or post season testing can be conducted on behalf of the tyre supplier, currently Pirelli. This testing would be for the purpose of tyre development and not car development and is at the discretion of the FIA. These tests would be divided into six two day tests.

    Only two pre-season tests will take place, both held at the Circuit de Catalunya in 2016, the maximum testing mileage remains 15,000km.

    This further restriction on testing makes it even harder for teams to get an understanding of setup, tyres and the car overall, especially if any of them have production delays or reliability issues in the lead up to the pre-season tests. It also makes it rather tricky for young drivers to get up to speed in the real cars.

    Safety study
    The FIA is continuing its safety crusade and in 2016 much of that is focused on understanding crashes and what happens during a crash. For this purpose each car will be fitted with a high speed camera made by Magneti Marelli which will be used to study the drivers head movements during an impact. Additionally drivers will now all have to wear in-ear accelerometers whenever they are in the car.

    Driving standards
    This one will likely see lots of penalties applied through the season, in 2015 the rules said that “drivers must not deliberately leave the track without a justifiable reason”, but in the 2016 rules it rather politely states that “drivers must make every reasonable effort to use the track at all times and may not deliberately leave the track without a justifiable reason.” It is a subtle change in wording and I think leaves the situation rather open to interpretation. What does 'reasonable effort' really mean? I think this one will be revisited during the season.

    Wind tunnel usage
    The FIA has clearly become a little suspicious of some teams aerodynamic development rate so now requires every team to supply two digital photos (front and rear quarter views one must assume) with a date stamp on them of the wind tunnel models before each run. The pictures have to show the entire working section with the model clearly shown in full. This would highlight if a team has pushed the rules or even broken them, at least that is the theory. With data theft in the spotlight at the moment in F1 it is worth noting that the FIA is creating the ultimate F1 aerodynamic archive all in one place, creates quite a challenge in terms of cyber security.

    Tyres
    The new tyre rules need to be examined in more detail in the coming weeks but the headlines are that the teams have more freedom in terms of tyre selection strategies but critically those selections must be made a full eight weeks ahead of European races and fourteen weeks ahead of non-European rounds. This means that the tyres for the Australian Grand Prix must be selected on 17th December. This is quite a challenge for the teams as they have not run their 2016 cars yet and may not have tested all five compounds of slick tyre at the post season Abu Dhabi test, therefore they have to rely on Pirelli data which itself may not be fully validated on track. For Haas in particular this is a really tough call as it has yet to run its car at all. It's all a bit of a case of the one eyed man leading the blind.

    Subtle though they may seem, even minor changes to the Sporting Regulations have the ability to shake up the order on the track. For me, rules are perhaps becoming overly complex and in some cases for no really good reason. However most of the changes have been made to stir up the order a little in a year when no major technical changes will be enforced and that can only be a good thing…

    Credit to crash.net for the info

    Engine switches: RBR, STR, and Lotus becoming a factory team.

    RBR is probably the most important of all these updates when it comes to their PU next season. As they'll be branded tag heuer though in reality the same manufacture for the past decade to power them. However, this is a bit more key than simply having a group rebrand an engine under their image (not a first in F1), from a investment and marketing sense for one but also well put by @AJ see below.

    STR, will return to Ferrari power, but more importantly will only do so in the same manner as Marussia Manor did and run an older power unit. The 2016 power unit which probably isn't fully finished was still first introduced and ready to race in Japan 2015, and has been used at the end of the season by both drivers.

    Renault (ex Lotus): Have officially confirmed their return to F1 as a works team and not just a supplier of engines. In doing such they will inform the public more in depth next month.

    Important info carried over from 2015 thread for 2016 season
     

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    Last edited: Dec 12, 2015
  2. LMSCorvetteGT2

    LMSCorvetteGT2

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    2016 Tire Regulations:

    PRE-RACE TYRE NOMINATIONS AND PREPARATIONS

    • In consultation with the FIA, Pirelli will decide in advance which three compoundscan be used at each race, and communicate this information to the teams.
    • The total number of sets that can be used during practice, qualifying and racing remains the same as it is currently: 13.
    • Pirelli will nominate two mandatory race sets for each car. Furthermore, one set of the softer compound will have to be kept for use in Q3only.
    • The two mandatory sets chosen by Pirelli can be of two different compounds, from the three that have been nominated for the race weekend. These sets will obviously be identical for each team.
    • The remaining 10 sets can be chosen by each team, from the three compounds nominated for the race weekend.
    • The teams will make their choices within a deadline set by Pirelli. They will communicate their choices to the FIA, which will in turn tell Pirelli how many tyres to produce. The choices for each car will remain secret until 2 weeks before the race. If a team does not meet the deadline, the choice will be made by the FIA.
    • Once the choices for each car have been made, the FIA will continue to assign the tyres randomly via a barcode, as is the case currently.
    • The choices made by each team can vary for each of its cars: so each driver within a team can have a different allocation.
    • The tyres will be distinguished by different coloured markings on the sidewalls, as is currently the case.
    DURING THE RACE

    • Teams will still have to give back tyres according to a certain schedule, but they can decide which tyres to give back at the following times:
    - One set after the first 40 minutes of FP1
    - One set at the end of FP1
    - Two sets at the end of FP2
    - Two sets at the end of FP3

    • The two mandatory sets nominated by Pirelli cannot be given back during practice and must be available for usein the race. At least one of these two sets must be used during the race - but the teamscan decide which one.
    http://www.formula1.com/content/fom.../12/pirelli-clarify-new-tyre-regulations.html
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2015
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  3. MHPALA

    MHPALA

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    I forgot to post this in the 2015 thread because of being busy.

    http://arstechnica.co.uk/cars/2015/...data-needs-to-move-even-faster-than-its-cars/

    In this article it was stated that (if I remember correctly) only a certain number of cars were able to have their cameras active (4 cars, I think), and for 2016 this limitation will be abolished since they are deploying a new system that will allow all of the cars to have their cameras active. This bit of info was taken out since it was a breach of the NDA.
     
  4. prisonermonkeys

    prisonermonkeys Premium

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    Ferrari have once again threatened to quit, this time over independent engines:

    http://www.skysports.com/f1/news/12...t-f1-as-sport-races-towards-epic-power-battle

    Here's a crazy idea - DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT. They have a position on the Strategy Working Group and a veto over the regulations. Is it too much to ask that they stop serving their own interests and start msking decisions for the good of the sport?
     
  5. paulpg87

    paulpg87

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    They are right if ideas for the "good of the sport" are even worse than actual rules.. after the federation forced manufactures to spend mio€ to develop new engines than now nobody wants to use anymore.

    Now they want to patch the situation they've created with insane and absurd solutions at disadvantage of historical manufactures that had the burden of developing this engines and have been virtuous in their management.

    In fact also Mercedes and Honda agree with Ferrari and Marchionne is totally right. Also Honda principal said yesterday they will quit (i have the article in italian only) if new engines are introduced or price cap is forced to manufacturers.

    Finally Ecclestone moaning about others trying to take care about their own good is comic. Quote of the year really.

    They should care about teams like RBR that threaten to quit when they are not competitive.. like kids..
     
  6. twitcher

    twitcher

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    If memory serves correct, Ferrari has threatened to quit before, haven't they?

    Where would they go if they quit F1? There's always WEC, but they'll run into budget caps there too. Would they start their own series?

    Kind of seems like an empty threat.
     
  7. Northstar

    Northstar Premium

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    Yes, it's something of a ritual at this point.:lol:
     
  8. LMSCorvetteGT2

    LMSCorvetteGT2

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    It's the off season this is what they always do to remind the world that watches F1, how important they are. I mean this is the same man (group) that said earlier this week there is high potential to bring Alfa back to F1.

    Who doesn't want to use them? They just don't want to be restricted, Ferrari's issue is they're fine with everyone wanting V4/I4/I5/V6T/V6TT and even up to a 1000hp engines on any of those...so long as they aren't the ones having to make them. So they propose that the restriction on the engine factor be lifted. Now with the amount of tech we have today one could easily make a 8 or 10 or even 12 more efficient than the last time they were in F1 and still be powerful if not more so with hybrid systems. The problem is spending, I feel that the FIA will only ever agree to open up restrictions if a budget cap is agreed upon by everyone. As usual teams (like Ferrari) want their cake and to eat too.

    In ideal I agree restrictions should be lifted, it only makes sense in a series that is based on being the pinnacle of racing and research and development for racing and road cars. What I don't agree with is killing the rest of the sport to achieve saving some of it. I also agree with his saying of teams don't have a right to competitive engines as redbull seem to think. And the reason is because as you've said the manufactures have the burden to build and design engines in such tight restrictions as well as build their own cars. RBR doesn't have such issue and can just build a chassis on the same budget as other high end constructors but at time do it better...why would any self serving team want to give that group their engine?

    All in all I agree with some of what you've echoed and Marchionne has said, but when you stop and break it down it as times past. It's just what Ferrari wants for themselves and damn the rest of it.


    *his being Marchionne
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2015
  9. prisonermonkeys

    prisonermonkeys Premium

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  10. prisonermonkeys

    prisonermonkeys Premium

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    More speculation is emerging about VAG entering the sport, this time with Red Bull under the Lamborghini name. The theory goes that the TAG Heuer deal is a one-year stop-gap solution following some of Christian Horner's comments that Red Bull are on the verge of announcing a 2017 engine partner within the next few weeks. Meanwhile, VAG have reportedly cut the budgets of Porsche and Audi, with talk that there may only be two 919 Hybrids and two R18s at Le Mans. The company took a hit with the emissions scandal, but it's not as widespread as first thought, so the theory holds that VAG will expand to Formula 1 without actually spending any more money than they currently are.
     
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  11. LMSCorvetteGT2

    LMSCorvetteGT2

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    And with Lambo or even Bugatti as first talked about it still is the same thing, except one has some F1 history even if it was very poor and patchy, but the same thing as a Sports car group building race cars thus having a marketing trend that is more direct. VW was always claimed as a non-possibility because certain other series like...WRC are better for displaying what you get when you buy a VW and F1 isn't that. That's if all these rumors are to be believed, time will tell but I wouldn't be surprised if VAG keeps expanding Motorsports wise
     
  12. prisonermonkeys

    prisonermonkeys Premium

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    I should add a disclaimer that this whole theory is being born out of different bits and pieces of circumstantial evidence being cobbled together into something vaguely convincing.

    VAG don't need to spend more money on sportscars because Audi and Porsche are dominating. The Toyota is clearly under-developed, and Nissan have withdrawn. So it doesn't matter if Audi or Porsche come out on top; VAG win either way. It's a similar situation in the WRC, where the Polo R is in a class of its own. Citroën are backing off until 2017 and the new regulations, while Toyota are delaying their return as well. The M-Sport Fiestas are fantastic little cars, but the team's business model is based on selling rally cars to privateer teams, so they have a limited budget. Their only real challenge is Hyundai, who invested in a brand-new i20 WRC for this year, but even then, Neuville is inconsistent, Paddon is largely unproven, and Sordo is a good back-up driver, while Volkswagen have the best three drivers.
     
  13. LMSCorvetteGT2

    LMSCorvetteGT2

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    Yeah I know all this already, the point being they have an image already made easily for the cars they sell through motorsport domination/reign over all those who run against them. Thus this translates into an ability to give justifcation for why their cars are better than a Lexus or a Nissan. Same goes for VW. However, their more super car dedicated manufactures don't have this, and F1 if they wanted would be a good way of doing this. There are still issues though, that I have yet to see answered. Such as the engine, we get that RBR have the chassis design tools and team of a group that might as well be a top tier manufacture but they don't have an engine group to match and not one with less money than FCA and Mercedes have. Problem is usually something this big has insider info with some mock images of the engine and details, but all that's been said is a deal is going to happen, but nothing else. At least with Honda there was some idea before it was confirmed.
     
  14. GTPorsche

    GTPorsche

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    Good news everyone!

     
  15. prisonermonkeys

    prisonermonkeys Premium

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    "Good news, everyone! I have built a racing car that can be safely crashed into a wall!"

    "But Professor, Pastor Maldonado isn't driving for us this year."

    "Nonsense, Leela. I don't need a twelve-time World Champion to crash my car when any idiot will do. Speaking of idiots, where is Fry?"
     
  16. prisonermonkeys

    prisonermonkeys Premium

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  17. GTPorsche

    GTPorsche

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    "if Eccelstone and FOM are willing to pay for it"

    So much for that plan...
     
  18. prisonermonkeys

    prisonermonkeys Premium

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    I do like Marchionne. He doesn't suffer fools gladly and he has a pretty down-to-earth style. He's not about the personality, prestige and politics the way Luca di Montezemolo was.

    They're the ones that want it, and they're having a hard time convincing independent manufacturers to come in.
     
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  19. LMSCorvetteGT2

    LMSCorvetteGT2

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    I agree, they should because I see it as a unlikely event others will join if things are still the same as they are now in the next couple years. However, that's up to the group to decide how expansive they want the sport to become. The only other way I could possibly see manufactures come in is if the FIA was to lax the rules on engines in the first place.
     
  20. TenEightyOne

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    The difficulty in F1 (not a new one by any means) is that people spend a lot of money to win. Spending money to give other people a better chance of taking those wins is anathema to them - perfectly understandable.

    Regulating F1 spending has always been impossible in practical terms and, in my opinion, always will be. I don't know what the answer is - I suspect it's to limit downforce and allow more cars to be "mechanically" competitive while having an engine design/upgrade formula that allows competitive development by all teams/suppliers.

    If I make that sound terribly easy it's because I'm quite crazy.
     
  21. LMSCorvetteGT2

    LMSCorvetteGT2

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    I get the last part as a joke, and obvious sarcasm, but you're right it really is that easy. And to keep it seeming otherwise, politics play a much heavier role to make it seem the opposite. Which we all know, but how to get rid of said politics...hm?
     
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  22. DK

    DK Premium

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  23. LMSCorvetteGT2

    LMSCorvetteGT2

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    Yeah we tend to talk about the next year in these threads without indirectly acknowledging it. I just end up posting it in the OP for the following year. Either way it works, I was about to post how Pirelli were also hurting the potential of faster 2017 cars as well.
     
  24. TenEightyOne

    TenEightyOne Premium

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    It's a big job though, or at least Pirelli say so. It will be the greatest load ever on a racing tyre ever if those levels are reached. Given the ****-storm that Pirelli faced in Vettel-Spa-Gate (and similar) they're seemingly not prepared to over-inflate that particular envelope. They also note that the greatly increased loads (in the average order of 10 to 15%) will require much higher tyre pressures which will squarely reduce lateral mechanical grip through a) pressure and b) a requirement for tougher compounding.
     
  25. GTPorsche

    GTPorsche

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  26. prisonermonkeys

    prisonermonkeys Premium

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    McLaren have poached Jost Capito from Volkswagen's WRC team.
     
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  27. LMSCorvetteGT2

    LMSCorvetteGT2

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    Thank you for posting this as I saw it several hours ago, but working on actual work was more important, and same goes to @GTPorsche. Keep it up guys :tup:

    Yeah but here's a thought...don't build a weak tire like the FIA want and actually build something that works, that the teams love and that can provide something everyone want. Actual racing. The thing is with the pecking order established back in 2014, pit stops have little to no affect for the overall year. They only ever shake up one or two races when a team forgets their collective hive mind at the previous GP. Like for example when Williams get leaped frog even though they had a better quali than RBR or Ferrari for a gp.

    The FIA may get upset but what would they do...they'd have to run the course of that season, and if it goes better than the gimmick tires then keep it, if not go back to paper mache tires the following season. The fact that F1 is still trying to find that perfect formula of tires, shows more of the asinine FIA guidelines than anything else. As others have and will say, this wasn't a problem when Bridgestone were the provider and even Michelin had a better tire.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2016
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  28. prisonermonkeys

    prisonermonkeys Premium

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    It's not an immediate appointment - Capito will stay with Volkswagen for the time being, and gradually move to McLaren. It's a great move for McLaren, and will hopefully give Hyundai, M-Sport, Citroën and Toyota (when they return in 2017) a fighting chance in the WRC.
     
  29. RX-7_FD3S

    RX-7_FD3S

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    Pirelli is now claiming that they can' t do tyre for the 2017 with the new specs. They can't make tyre that will last long enough and give the grip the teams wants.

    Link : http://www.bbc.com/sport/formula1/35283404

    Frankly, I have enough with Pirelli, give us Michelin back please.
     
  30. prisonermonkeys

    prisonermonkeys Premium

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    I suspect they're playing games and that someone - either Jean Todt or Bernie Ecclestone - put them up to it. The 2017 regulations have been talked up for some time now, but there has been no movement whatsoever. Pirelli's comments come hot on the heels of renewed criticism of the Strategy Working Group.

    They would be faced with the same restrictions as Pirelli. Pirelli's problem is one of physics.
     
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