Beater or Sleeper? GT6 Car of the Week Thread

Discussion in 'Gran Turismo 6' started by McClarenDesign, Dec 29, 2013.

  1. McClarenDesign

    McClarenDesign Premium

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    Tune as you like, but there will be limits, with or without aero.
     
  2. MustangManiac

    MustangManiac Premium

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    Look so bad! Kids theses days, with all their angles and wings and Lambos and things...what so bad about a sleek, sexy, sensual, curvasious boooody...excuse me, I have to go now :crazy:
     
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  3. Niku Driver HC

    Niku Driver HC

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    Yeah, I've been pondering whether I show up with or without a wing, I might just keep the new pair of "shoes" (rims) and remove the wing altogether... I do think a wing just ruins the rear of this car, regardless of the type.
     
  4. Vic Reign93

    Vic Reign93 Premium

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    The alpine I'll be running is lightly upgraded, new rims,paint,oil,upgraded differential,clutch,brakes,suspension,tyres and a minor weight loss. :p
     
  5. XDesperado67

    XDesperado67 Premium

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    Weight loss?:odd:
    I'm adding weight for more power!:crazy::lol:
     
  6. Vic Reign93

    Vic Reign93 Premium

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    Depending on the restrictions I might shed even more weight out of it. Currently it's only lost 15kg and I know there's at least another 60kg I can shed from its curb-weight if needed. Will be interesting to find out that in a light car, is taking more weight out better than adding power and more weight? :idea:
     
  7. XDesperado67

    XDesperado67 Premium

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    Because of the way the PP system works once you get under a certain weight you'll actually be faster with more power and weight.

    No real gain in handling from a lighter car and the extra power will actually give you better acceleration and top speed for a given PP.

    Added power to take the car to 500PP but didn't really have the speed to be competitive there. Threw a bunch of ballast on and lost 6HP to get to 450PP and my time at Spa was less than 2 seconds slower than at 500PP.
    Like that it could at least hope to compete against newer 450PP cars while it would get blitzed at 500PP.
     
  8. un4givn85

    un4givn85

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    im only thinking of the custom spoiler option
    those goofy huge wings are not meant to be on regular cars
     
  9. MustangManiac

    MustangManiac Premium

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    1972 Alpine A110 1600S

    1Syracuse.jpg
    Do you come here often?

    They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder, she does have a bit of a long snout, but I have been told that I am attracted to ladies with big noses. Waitaminit...are we talking about carz or girlz here...sometimes I get so confused :crazy:

    Brands Hatch Grand Prix Circuit_1.jpg
    I can't believe how tiny this car is.

    By the numbers:
    stock: 138hp/422pp
    tuned: 180hp/457pp
    My usual mild tune, no suspension work.

    Brands Hatch Grand Prix Circuit_2.jpg
    It does look a bit cramped in there.

    I chose the National-A Championship, 3 lapper at Brands Hatch for a test.
    stock: P2 - total 5:46.954 / best 1:55.151
    tuned: P1 - total 5:26.282 / best 1:48.097
    A significant improvement at the track, the car handled great as long as you could keep from bouncing off the behemoths you were racing against. The small light weight nature of the car allowed you out corner most anything, which you better use to your advantage because they would certainly catch you on the straights!
    Brands Hatch Grand Prix Circuit_4.jpg
    Playin' with the big boys.

    This Dodge didn't care much for my dive-bomb pass into the corner...

    Brands Hatch Grand Prix Circuit_5.jpg

    ...he caught me down the next straight, which wasn't helped much by my off in over cooking the corner after the pass...
    Brands Hatch Grand Prix Circuit_6.jpg

    ...Mr Mopar about to let me know just how much he didn't care for that pass in the previous corner :scared:
    Goodwood Hillclimb_1.jpg
    Using all the tarmac and just a bit more at Goodwood.

    Goodwood Hillclimb TT, best of five runs:
    stock: 58:330
    tuned: 57.157
    The only thing I have used the arcade Goodwood runs for are cotw times, the tuned GNX still holds the top spots occupying 1,2,4 and 6. The tuned Alpine has 3, 5 with the stock one at 7 Leaving the final spot to the tuned Pug RCZ.

    Goodwood Hillclimb_3.jpg
    How I spent 2 of my 5 runs at Goodwood with the tuned Alpine.

    In retrospect, suspension tuning would probably have been the way to go with the tuned car. While she still handled well the extra power combined with the body roll made it too easy to overcook a fast corner or bring the rear around on a tight turn. I am not sure if beefing the motor up another 20pp or so would have done much, it's so small I am not sure if she could hang with more powerful cars on a track with long straights. However, on a tight and twisty track she can certainly hold her own and is a lot of fun to drive!
    If I have time during the week I may just take her out on the snow or dirt. I will have to warn you ahead of time though, while my skills were first honed in real life on the dirt, that was on two wheels. On 4 wheels, not so much, but it may be worth a laugh :dopey:
    Another great choice, keep'em coming :gtpflag:
     
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  10. XDesperado67

    XDesperado67 Premium

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    Just want to note that the Anniversary A110 isn't really comparable to the premium one.
    Not really sure what PD did to the Anni version but its engine produces a lot more power.

    The Anni stock no oil change has 196HP and 162ft-lb torque. Looking at the available power upgrade options for it apparently it already has an upgraded computer (carbaration/fuel injection system given age of car :lol: ) and sports catalytic converter as stock.

    However if you take the premium one and add just those two parts you'll only have 155HP and 121ft-lb torque.:odd:
     
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  11. McClarenDesign

    McClarenDesign Premium

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    Ya know, @XDesperado67 , I don't wake up every morning crushing your dreams... :)
     
  12. un4givn85

    un4givn85

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    geez, i miss one week and this dies out?
    :sly:
    where is everyone?
     
  13. Vic Reign93

    Vic Reign93 Premium

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    Just hiding in plain sight. :lol:

    McClaren is probably still sorting out the videos, he upgraded his equipment and I'm guessing he's just working out any bugs in the system. Shame you couldn't make it though, there was some very good racing especially between me and Lewis_ Hamilton. ;)
     
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  14. McClarenDesign

    McClarenDesign Premium

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    Funny you should mention that...


    More will be posted after work.
     
  15. un4givn85

    un4givn85

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    looks like i missed some good racing
    nice videos now, thats cool, we can actually see them now lol
     
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  16. iainn

    iainn Premium

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    Been away so haven't had a chance to post this week on this car even though I did my runs on Monday.

    This is a great looking car, and I like it's small size compared to the modern ways. I already had the Anniversary car that I'd used in some earlier career races, but I bought another one for this.
    [​IMG]

    Off to Brands again for a spin round the Indy circuit and it's a good fun drive.
    [​IMG]

    The Anniversary version was a good few seconds quicker, but noticeably harder to control with the extra power.
    [​IMG]

    Off to GTAuto next for a new paintjob and wheels. I think it does look good in some non-Alpine non-blue colours!
    [​IMG]
    A new custom wing as well adds to the sporty effect.

    Looking for something other than time trials I tried some competitive racing in the Night Masters race at Mt Panorama. Up against some much bigger and newer cars here, but I can catch them on the corners up the hill and out brake them too. I left the Alpine unmodified and it made for some close racing.

    [​IMG]
    Start of the race at dusk

    [​IMG]
    Getting ahead

    [​IMG]
    Blocking the NSX across the line to win by 1 tenth!

    All in all an excellent choice, and I'm just sorry I didn't get to spend a lot of time with it this week.

    Cheers
     
  17. McClarenDesign

    McClarenDesign Premium

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    More will be posted tonight. Lots of technical gremlins, most were just ghosts.
     
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  18. McClarenDesign

    McClarenDesign Premium

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    Last edited: Feb 1, 2014
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  19. Baron Blitz Red

    Baron Blitz Red

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    The Alpine was a blast to drive, although it took me a bit to get used to how small it was. Most races, it was "How's the weather up there?" to EVERY car in the field. If it wasn't for the helmets, I bet you could use the side view mirrors on the other cars to make sure your hair was in place. :lol: Tons of fun this one, can't wait to see the next choice on the menu!

    Cheers
     
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  20. focusST300

    focusST300

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    What a car!! I Love it
     
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  21. McClarenDesign

    McClarenDesign Premium

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    -McClarenDesign's-
    Super Best Friends Super Aguri Super Review of the Car of the Week
    "I'm very sorry and I'm just glad nobody is hurt. That's the main thing." -Romain Grosjean

    Week 5: 1972 Alpine A110 1600s vs 1972 Alpine A110 1600s (15th Anniversary Edition) vs 1973 Alpine A110 1600s

    Limits.

    As soon as we're born, it's within our nature to be curious and inquisitive about everything around us. Through success and failure we gain experience, and our future successes and failures are directly reliant upon those studies along with the acceptance of fresh data and even more experimentation. We don't become Gene Kelly immediately upon exiting from the womb, but with the proper practice and interpretation of the experiences we gain over time, that goal no longer becomes unobtainable. However, if we aren't intrepid enough to face the initial difficulties of standing, we'd have absolutely no hope.

    During our lifetime, we continually test these experiences and measure the outcomes. Good marks in school can lead to rewards at home, while poor behavior can just as easily land you a swift and firm beating. The result of these measurements is referred to as "capability", and generally falls into one of two categories; either you are, or you aren't. Future testing of those same capabilities can begin once the current results are studied and interpreted, along with the addition of new information. Experimentation leads to adaptation, and your survival depends on your Darwinian ability to adapt and evolve.

    [​IMG]

    Natural ability, then, is often seen as obtaining repeatable success with minimum experience, data, and effort. Babe Ruth had a natural ability for hitting baseballs over great distances, Albert Einstein used math to explain the universe, and even Flavor Flav retained the ability to dispel anticipation amongst a large gathering of people. This natural ability, sometimes known as "talent", is then used by society to measure, separate, and sometimes unite. Four lads that were talented in music became The Beatles, Rocky Marciano defeated Joe Lewis, and Leonardo da Vinci is still shaming painters, scholars, sculptors and scientists to this very day. Had they not explored their own limitations, none would be the legend they are today.

    At the other end of the spectrum is "incapability" and "inability", discovered only by reaching limitations. As a child, I was incapable of having another cookie because of the limitations of my height at the time. These limitations can be either internal or external, and how we reach them and when we stop testing determines our order amongst those of similar interest. Liberace was incapable of being stealthy, Donald Trump is incapable of being funny, and even World Champion Sebastian Vettel is incapable of being a decent human being.

    Either by fact, physics or trepidation, we all have our limits.

    [​IMG]

    According to Polyphony Digital (via Translator-san):

    When I learned that we would be testing not one, but three, French cars this week, I was immediately confronted with several limitations that would prove challenging. The first of which was the limits of my self-control and tolerance, as I immediately launched into an explosion of expletives that only George Carlin could be proud of. Testing the Peugeot as a means of escaping incarceration was one thing, but now I'd been handed my relative freedom and asked to willingly be tortured again. Thrice. It's the same thing as saying "well, since you've already taken an nasty spill down a flight of stairs, try these other stairs, and tell us if they hurt less or more."

    Next up was my patience, as our executive staff started droning on about "contractual obligations" and the legal definitions and penalties of a "breech" of said contracts. This was quickly followed by the limits to my creativity, as I was unable to find an escape route, then acceptance of my fate as I was at the limit of my available options. Despite no outward appearance of demonic activity within the room, it certainly felt like forces of evil were conspiring against me in the hopes that I'd reach my limits of sanity. Despite what romanticists will tell you, limitations cannot be exceeded, only adjusted or redefined. I wasn't close to going insane because I was, and continue to be, already insane.

    [​IMG]

    Performance (as purchased): January 26, 2014, Bleu Alpine (Blue) *1972 model as shown
    Displacement: 1,565 cc
    Max. Power: 144 HP @ 6,500 rpm
    Max. Torque: 119.9 ft-lb @ 5,000 rpm
    Drivetrain: RR
    Length: 151.6 in., Height: 44.5 in., Width: 59.8 in., Weight: 715 kg
    Tires: Comfort (Soft)
    Performance Points: 429
    Mileage: 116.6 mi

    Mercifully, rather than testing three different French manufacturers or models, we'd only be using one model with two available variants. By the grace of God, the word "Clio" was nowhere in the the paperwork, but then again there wasn't a Bugatti either. I don't understand exactly how people can claim that there is any god when faced with suffering such as this. If god isn't going to help starving children, then they clearly lack the omnipotence they advertise, and it's only though omnipotence that I ever expect to find myself behind the wheel of a Veyron. Thanks to the enabling praise of blind worshipers in large numbers, every god since the dawn of time has displayed a fragile ego, and clearly the Veyron possesses enough power to rotate the Earth, unite the heavens, and it will even spare the time to help terminally ill children. What would Jesus do... if he were just upstaged by a boat that could turn into a car? Walk all you want, no miracle is going to get you from Point A to Point B faster than a car.

    If you posses the capability of helping starving children across the globe, yet choose not to, aren't you equally culpable for their plight? When you give drought, plague, and famine as a gift, how can you possibly claim to be benevolent and just? Do you really expect me to blindly take your word for it that they deserve to suffer? Likewise, when a car maker relentlessly introduces front-wheel drive cars continually, do you believe it's done to save your soul, or a Franc? Do you pray for death by understeer? Perhaps the biggest limitation French automotive design faces today is the knee-jerk reaction to put front-wheel drive in everything. Had TVR continued with their wind turbine buffoonery, I'd suggest that this might be the limits of reason, but with their return all bets are off.

    [​IMG]

    According to Polyphony Digital (via Translator-san):

    During any test, the credibility and purity of the results is paramount. Flawed data leads to flawed analysis, and as every Ferrari wind tunnel technician can attest, the resulting chaos increases exponentially. Having our Super Best Friends, Super Aguri, with us should help us keep all information that's gathered completely safe from calamity, contamination or confusion. It's also important for the testers to be completely unbiased, prepared for whatever results may come, and completely confident in the data and observations they acquire. In a perfect world, you simply step on a scale, and the device would measures the force of gravity upon you, then displays the results in units kilograms. Unless you're American, in which case the kilos are substituted for cheeseburgers called "pounds". Because we don't, this machine needs to be re-checked, re-certified and re-calibrated, just like every other measuring device or equipment.

    Before we began testing, however, the Best Friends noticed some Super anomalies before the cars had moved an inch. The 1972 Alpine had the smaller engine, yet produced the same power as the larger unit despite being shorted 40 cc, and retained a higher "Performance Point" value. There were no differences in dimensions, power, or weight, yet the '72 appeared on paper to be the weaker of the two cars. The old adage "no replacement for displacement" has found it's exception with this car. Despite the added cubic centimeters, there was no weight penalty between the two, indicating that whatever caused this confusion was done internally, not externally, yielding no observable penalties or benefits. While the '73 could boast about its larger engine like a muscle car enthusiast in a Honda dealership, if the performance of the two were equal, then there may be a theoretical disadvantage by decreased fuel economy.

    [​IMG]

    Performance (as purchased): February 1, 2014, Bleu Alpine (Blue) *1973 model as shown
    Displacement: 1,605 cc
    Max. Power: 144 HP @ 6,500 rpm
    Max. Torque: 119.9 ft-lb @ 5,000 rpm
    Drivetrain: RR
    Length: 151.6 in., Height: 44.5 in., Width: 59.8 in., Weight: 715 kg
    Tires: Comfort (Soft)
    Performance Points: 426
    Mileage: 102.3 mi

    Since we're testing the completely French Alpine A110 1600S, you might expect that a French location would be chosen for our weekend of testing. If not Paul Ricard or Le Mans, perhaps something close, like Spa or Monaco. Instead, we've decided to adjust our limits of stupidity by using the French car to invade the streets of London. If you ask me, this is nearly as bad as giving prisoners in La Bastille access to HSN with an unlimited credit card, but our producer seems incapable of good taste and tact. While not exactly on bad terms today, England and France haven't always enjoyed peaceful relations.

    While the cars appeared very similar on paper, minus the Anniversary Edition, establishing a baseline of performance is never a simple task. While a child looks at an empty glass and sees nothing in it, the mathematical process for calculating and ensuring absolute zero is maddening and best left to the professionals. While we were confident in the mechanical abilities of the cars and the accuracy of their performance, there wasn't so much confidence in mine. Like the stopwatch and the engines in the cars, I would also be calibrated, measuring each lap against a lap from another cars. If there was any performance to be had by the extra displacement and Performance Points, it was up to me to find it and put it on display. The task would be much simpler if someone could explain what a bloody Performance Point is, but the Super Best Friends are incapable of explaining it on simple terms and I'm incapable of staying awake throughout the lecture.


    The first car I took out was the 1972 1600S, down on displacement but apparently not on much else. Dropping down three gears before the first turn was a chore in itself, and the location of the engine above the axle didn't help any. That being said, I expected the car to handle like a Porsche, but because the engine doesn't hang behind the rear axle but on top instead, the A110 didn't exhibit the traditional nervousness that I usually experience in rear-wheel drive Porsches. But like the Porsche, corrections to steering had to be carefully thought out because they would be equally dramatic, darting you head-on into whatever barrier you happened to be looking at. With this sort of layout, the general rule is that if you take your eyes away from road ahead, you'll soon plow into whatever caught your attention.

    Turn 1 is a tight right hand turn, but after getting a few warm up laps in, I was able to maintain a reasonable amount of grip in the tires and keep the attitude of the car positive. The near-90 degree S curves of Turns 2 and 3, however, would test my courage on a regular basis. As the speed increased, so did the strain on my reflexes and timing, culminating with Turn 3 being taken sans wheels. During the transition between 2 and 3, the sudden and rapid change of direction was enough to lift the entire right side off the asphalt while I was left to cope with every danger sense in my mind on meltdown. Flipping the Buick in Germany had provided me costly education on the misuse of curbing, but here the barriers were lethal, close by, and I didn't need the psychological trauma again as another reminder.
    With a 1:02.849 in the books, I was relieved to be back in the pits.

    [​IMG]

    According to Polyphony Digital (via Translator-san):
    Next was the '73 1600S, and as for the extra cubic centimeters, it was a bit disappointing. I didn't expect any extra power, but adding excess complications of manufacturing the larger engine didn't feel like it was producing any positive results. Lap after lap I attempted to push the limits of myself and the car, this one also obtaining a two-wheeled "gangsta lean" on the exit of Turn 3. The car didn't feel any better with the "upgraded" rear suspension. If anything, it seemed to be softer than the '72, which isn't to say it was better or worse, just different. Although feeling softer, the articulation of the suspension kept the tyre firmly planted to the pavement, minus Turn three where it attempted to give passers by a high five.

    Also different was the gearing. In the '72, I'd drop three gears before going into Turn 1. With the '73 it was only two gears, but the response felt lazier and bogged down when compared to the '72. I'm no mechanical engineer or black magic wizard, but by feel alone I could tell that were I to push this car for the same lap time, I'd either end up dead or wishing I were to avoid paying for the car. Instead of feeling like the earlier model, the car felt eerily similar to the DeLorean we'd tested years ago, also powered by a Renault engine. Or rather, underpowered. From a competition standpoint, I might be able to justify the small differences between the '72 and '73 with only the promise of adding more modifications, but without spending ages learning how to modify the '73 for the added benefits allotted to it, I don't understand why Alpine would make such a drastic change unless it added to the overall package. In this case, I wasn't seeing any benefit, and with a time of 1:03.336, neither was the stopwatch.

    [​IMG]

    Performance (as purchased): December 6, 2013, Alpine (Blue) *'72 15th Anniversary Edition
    Displacement: CLASSIFIED
    Max. Power: 206 HP @ 6,500 rpm
    Max. Torque: 170.1 ft-lb @ 5,000 rpm
    Drivetrain: RR
    Length: 151.6 in., Height: 44.5 in., Width: 59.8 in., Weight: 715 kg
    Tires: Comfort (Soft)
    Performance Points: 479
    Mileage: 47.3 mi

    Saving the best for last, I hopped into the special Anniversary Edition, fully prepared for an even slower time because more had been added to it. The previous test had shown that even though it had a larger engine, the '73 was still slower than the previous year's car by half a second, an eternity in the minds of race car drivers. That apprehension was soon relieved, as the extra horsepower was immediately apparent and appreciated. I'd also noticed that the different tires and suspension settings helped maintain all four tires on the ground, but the added power also required heavier braking and an enormous amount of planning before the turn actually approached. If you weren't a corner ahead mentally, the Alpine would bite as swiftly and deadly as a cobra.

    With a few laps to appreciate the added performance and power, I was able to tick off a 1:01.166, and I'm convinced that even more could be extracted had my testicles been of an appropriate mass. Although I was more conservative in this car than the others, I'd still managed to demonstrate what the 60 extra horses were worth over a second and a half on the track, or if your an investment banker, a mint. With enough laps, that could easily translate into a pit stop for tyres before even coming close to the other two when exiting.


    If the common man looks at a ruler, or almost any unit of measure, there is a clear line that divides the points where one measurement ends and another begins. For race car drivers, that small little notch becomes expanded to the similar dimensions of a football pitch. In between the two measurements lies an infinite amount of possibilities, some successful and some not. Within that tiny notch or mark is where the racer extracts tenths, hundredths, and even thousandths of a second. This translates to inches, then feet, and eventually miles. This subtle difference separated Senna from Prost, and it's in this minute space that legends are manifested.

    But like every vice, there is a darker side that also requires attention. You'll know that darker side because as you begin to explore your limits, or the car's, you'll hear the siren song of performance calling you towards your demise. Senna felt its sting in Monaco when he crashed out while in the lead. Any driver that tells you they drive at 100% for an entire race is a liar. Driving 100% throughout a race leaves absolutely no room for error correction, adjustment, or adaptation. Combined with the constantly changing attributes of the car as fuel lightens or of the track as fluids are leaked, driving full tilt 100% of the time means that you're oblivious when those minute changes eventually happen, and unprepared for how to deal with them.

    [​IMG]

    Mauro and Lucien Bianchi, Jean-Pierre Beltoise, Patrick Depailler, Jean Todt, Michèle Mouton, Henri Pescarolo and Pauli Toivonen have all raced under the Alpine banner. Pauli Toivonen fathered Henri Toivonen, who had the pleasure of being our very first rally car test. The Bianchi's eventually helped bring young Jules into world, and he now resides with Marussia in Formula 1. Jean-Pierre Beltoise also raced in F1 as did Depailler, while Jean Todt later went on to help Ferrari rekindle its love affair with championships and winning races. Michèle Mouton proved alpha males are complete idiots, on and off the track, while Henri Pescarolo also drove in F1 before dominating Le Mans and nearly everyone in it.

    For being such a small mark, limited in production numbers and the occasional French Five o'clock Friday attitude, Alpine contains one of the richest heritages in all of motorsport. Before creating the company, Jean Rédéle was himself a racer. Like Carroll Shelby, he also managed the nearly impossible feat of winning in his first ever race before going on to participate in the infancy of the WRC. It was the A110 that took the inaugural WRC crown, before the company was eventually bought by Renault. Although they might not be as well known as their Ferrari and McLaren counterparts, the depth of history within motorsport is certainly on par, and it shows in their cars.

    The funny thing about limits is that, like rules, they're made to be broken. Okay, not broken in the traditional sense (as I said earlier), but... adjusted. Caterham has recently purchased 50% of Alpine, and both plan on introducing a shared sports car within the coming years. If both manage to pull it off, we could eventually see the return of Alpine to Formula 1, either as Caterham or alongside as their competition.

    And who are we to be limited by our imagination?

    *The views and opinions expressed in this review do not necessarily reflect those of the manufacturer, the publisher, GTPlanet.net or it's members, nor anyone with an IQ above 3. If you have a history of epilepsy or seizures, consult a doctor before use. Certain patterns may trigger seizures with no prior history. Before using see the instruction manual included with your system for more details. For previous reviews, please visit: McClarenDesign's Very Serious SLS AMG Reviews of the Car of the Week N Stuff. Void where prohibited. All videos were filmed before a live studio audience. Car setup monitored by Dark Lion Racing's GT6 Tunes and Tricks app on Android, as administered by Super Best Friends Super Aguri. Contains wheat and soy ingredients. No goats were harmed in the making of this review that we are aware of. This product may cause significant hair loss, headaches, and damage to the immune system. Best wishes to Michael Schumacher! To advertise, contact McClarenDesign@gmail.com.

    -Super Previous Super Reviews-
    Insightful... but bollocks: Introduction To Failure (or How I went from a Very Serious SLS AMG to Super Best Friends Super Aguri)
    Week 1: '10 Peugeot RCZ

    Week 2: '88 Volvo 240 GLT Estate
    Week 3: '87 Buick Regal GNX
    Week 4: '57 BMW 507 vs '55 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2014
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  22. McClarenDesign

    McClarenDesign Premium

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    Congrats to Niku Driver HC!

    Be sure to ask your doctor if Multi 21 is right for you. Niku's choice for this week:

    The '90 Nissan Primera 2.0 TE!

    [​IMG]

    I don't think you understand our audience. In fact, I'm sure of it.

    "Born in Japan. Educated in Europe. Now Available in America."


    Bonus points for Crystal Method!
     
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  23. Niku Driver HC

    Niku Driver HC

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    Boy, this is going to be a barrel of laughs... :dopey: And I guess the Infiniti just had to be mentioned to remember me the car had an outing in 'Murica, didn't it? But hey, they said the car is good for control freaks:

    [​IMG]

    But we're talking about the Nissan here, so it shouldn't be much of an issue. Right? At least I got bonus points for the ad. :lol:
     
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  24. iainn

    iainn Premium

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    Nice. One for the modders this week. Exhaust gonna be scraping on de ground blud!


    EDIT:

    Actually on second thoughts, I'm going to try and re-create a British Touring Car Primera. Now I just need to see if I can get 300bhp without a turbo, that will be tonight's mission.

    Or buy 2 and go Bosozoku on one!
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2014
    McClarenDesign likes this.
  25. un4givn85

    un4givn85

    Messages:
    134
    Location:
    United States
    put about 75 miles on one of these last night
    decent handling little car

    then for fun i threw on the stage 3 turbo and stage 3 weight loss with a custom trans and took it to ssrx to get 190 mph lol, it hits the limiter at 161 in stock form
     
  26. JackRyanWMU

    JackRyanWMU

    Messages:
    527
    Location:
    United States
    That line in the car's description...."More European than most European Cars." Hmmm....that sounds like a claim worth testing...
     
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  27. Baron Blitz Red

    Baron Blitz Red

    Messages:
    2,175
    Location:
    Canada
    Another interesting choice for the COTW! My curiosity is peaked by the fact The Nissan is 40kg lighter than the Infiniti version... is this a hidden sarcastic comment about North Americans' obesity rates??? :lol: Hmmm...

    Cheers
     
    jflomario and McClarenDesign like this.
  28. NixxxoN

    NixxxoN (Banned)

    Messages:
    2,712
    Location:
    Spain
    The Nissan Primera... very popular car in my country in the 90's. Was a pretty good affordable family car at the time. The 150HP version was no supercar but was quite fast.

    For me the older P10 model was a good looking car and the newer P12 model is hideous.
     
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  29. McClarenDesign

    McClarenDesign Premium

    Messages:
    5,785
    Location:
    United States
    I haven't looked, is the G20 in the game?

    Weight differences are likely from the premium trim and equipment, including AC (not standard), leather, power windows, etc.
     
  30. Niku Driver HC

    Niku Driver HC

    Messages:
    9,232
    Location:
    Portugal
    Yes, the G20 hasn't gone away. You can find one as soon as you enter Infiniti's ingame dealer. It is the cheapest of its brand (and the least powerful too...) I do suppose all the extra luxury kit that went in the car can add some unwanted game, but I did not see that the weight was actually different.