Post your bike!

Discussion in 'Sports' started by miniMADness, Jan 24, 2004.

  1. Neal

    Neal Premium

    Messages:
    7,727
    Glad you got the tensioner working, I have much experience of apparently simple jobs developing into near impossible jobs...at least you didn't have to get the angle grinder out (yes, I have had to do this in the past!)

    Not that you need encouraging but looking forward to the photos.
     
  2. boiltheocean

    boiltheocean Premium

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    7,756
    Well actually....... :O

    I had to file huge chunks out of the Gusset Bachelor tensioner just so it would fit my frame. I gave up with it after deciding that using a fixed position tensioner is a bad idea so I went and bought a spring tensioned one instead. Never try save money on a chain tensioner, I actually snapped my brand new DH chain trying to get some tension from the Gusset.

    I've got a brake on it, Hope Mono Mini off eBay and my pedals should arrive tomorrow so I'll probably take some pictures of it then. I went for a ride today with my mates, instantly more comfortable than the Charge. Although I had some crappy first ride luck. Picked up a front puncture and the brake needs bleeding as it's so spongy, it doesn't actually have enough power to lock the wheel at the moment.
     
  3. boiltheocean

    boiltheocean Premium

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    7,756
    Here it is complete as necessary.

    [​IMG]

    Might get a SDG I-Beam and I-Fly seatpost if I feel like it sometime but it isn't necessary. Also some more red components wouldn't go a miss, maybe some red QR skewers and a red seatclamp.​
     
  4. Aldo

    Aldo

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    5,494
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    That looks pretty damn tasty!
     
  5. Neal

    Neal Premium

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    7,727
    Indeed, it looks mean...don't forget some tacky cool valve caps :D
     
  6. Alex.

    Alex. Premium

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    Thanks for the help guys. No it wasn't me on that forum despite similar circumstances :lol:

    I've found a bike called a Pinnacle Peak 0.0 for £249 reduced from £300. It's had good reviews and is seemingly exactly what I'm after. Anyone want to jump in and tell me it sucks before I go for it?
     
  7. Azuremen

    Azuremen Premium

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    17,821
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    I has new tires.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    So much better than the dead ones that were on it. And almost too much grip; did a stoppie at a light on accident earlier.
     
  8. Neal

    Neal Premium

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    7,727
    It looks comparable to similar priced bikes at chainreaction cycles but Halfords have just reduced their prices for their decent enough Carrera bikes. I got the Carrera Vulcan Disc spec for this price a couple of years ago and considering it was recently on for £350 it's a bit of a bargain and significantly better specification than the Pinnacle Peak 0.0.

    Up to you Alex but you can get more for your money at Halfords. Anyone else got any ideas for him?

    Carrera Vulcan V Spec £239 reduced from £309
    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/..._productId_518215_langId_-1_categoryId_165499

    Carrera Vulcan Disc Spec £263 reduced from £340
    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/..._productId_518255_langId_-1_categoryId_165499

    Carrera Kraken £343 reduced from £469
    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/..._productId_518223_langId_-1_categoryId_165499


    Nice tyres Cody :tup:
     
  9. Aldo

    Aldo

    Messages:
    5,494
    Location:
    Australia
    Without doubt go for that Vulcan Disc.
    The additional 20 quid is worth the disc brakes alone! Nevermind the slightly better forks!
     
  10. TB

    TB Moderator

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    30,759
    Location:
    United States
    I've gone out riding the last few nights and now that the new tires are on (I'll get actual pictures later but it's basically what I did a few years ago in reverse) I was interested in comparing the times, and therefore speed, of the new wheels. When I left the house I started the stopwatch, stopped it when I got back home and mapped out the ride on gmaps. On a 6.7 mile ride, the lugs yielded me an average of around 12mph. With significantly less effort, the new tires clocked in at 13.5 and I'd easily be able to bring that up to at least 15mph. Not bad for city riding.

    The one thing that I'm a bit peeved about is that I can't have my aerobar and headlight on the handlebar at the same time because there isn't enough room. If it's a choice between going a bit faster and being able to see, I choose to live!
     
  11. boiltheocean

    boiltheocean Premium

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    7,756
    Well I've had the worst luck ever today. Set off for Chicksands bike park and spent 1 hour in a traffic jam only to be beaten to the place by my friends who set off an hour after me. On top of that on the journey going to chicksands down the M1 my bike (Flow Myth) fell off the bike rack at 80mph only to be dragged along the motorway until we could pull over, thankfully I had a rope around it so it stayed attached via the front wheel however it could of easily of been lost for good, possibly even of killed someone. In the end the chain disappeared and I've got chunks missing from my handlebars and the grips are a right mess.
     
  12. TB

    TB Moderator

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    Holy crap, SsU! :scared:

    Any damage to the car?
     
  13. boiltheocean

    boiltheocean Premium

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    7,756
    Nope the car was fine as it was a rear mounted rack so the bikes hung off the back. Surprisingly little damage was done to the bike considering what actually happened. Basically the bike was parallel to the car so it just dragged along on the handlebars and spun the rear wheel. The major stuff like frame, forks and wheels are absolutely fine so while I am quite pissed that it fell off it won't cost much to replace the chain and grips.
     
  14. Neal

    Neal Premium

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    7,727
    Flippin hell mate, can't believe you nearly lost the bike so soon after getting it. I think you're very very lucky that only the bars, grips and chain need replacing. Did you actually get a ride or just turn back?
     
  15. Alex.

    Alex. Premium

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    8,833
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    The price of the Carrera disc spec has gone back up to £320, I was going to get it for £263 today, it was still discounted yesterday :mad:
     
  16. Neal

    Neal Premium

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    7,727
    Good news Alex, the 20% discount is applied in the basket so it's still £263.99 :D

    Best be quick though and do make sure all the bolts are tight and everything is adjusted when you get it.
     
  17. Alex.

    Alex. Premium

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    8,833
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    Brilliant, I wasn't looking online but at a local branch. Thanks mate it's been ordered :D
     
  18. ExigeEvan

    ExigeEvan Premium

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    17,188
    So my bike is um, busted. A year living outside near the sea and poorly maintained has left it in a rather bad state. It needs at minimum a new rear wheel (rim bent badly) and new bearing for the pedals.

    I'm planning to get a road bike soon anyway which will live a far more sheltered and well maintained life, but want to keep this bike for some light off-roading and general versatility.

    I can pick up a new wheel for £20, a mate has a spare bearing going at the cost of a few beers but I don't want to pay for someone to do the work because labour costs are stupid for someone fiddling with a bike with minimum qualifications (£10 an hour).

    So I was going to buy a tool set and with a little help from a more experienced friend and youtube videos, set about changing it over by myself.

    For £30 I can get a tool kit containing
    Thoughts?
     
  19. TB

    TB Moderator

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    30,759
    Location:
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    Depending on how difficult the actual process is, I'd go for doing it yourself. I needed a new chain and the local shop wanted $25 for parts and labor (already had my bike in to replace the cassette so obviously I know have my limits). I bought the chain and the chain tool for $10 and had it fixed inside of 30 minutes. Not too bad for a first time.
     
  20. boiltheocean

    boiltheocean Premium

    Messages:
    7,756
    We kept going to Chicksands as I could always of rode my mates bikes but thankfully someone in the carpark had a spare 9 speed chain so he gave it me after hearing my story, plus he also quite liked my bike as he had the same frame, wheels and forks as me for 3 years already. I won't be replacing the bars as they aren't that badly damaged, lucky it was only the tips of the bars that caught the road due to the slight sweep back they have, if I scratched up the middle though they would need replacing. A new set of grips will cover up the mess and make it unnoticeable. I'm mostly annoyed at losing the chain though as it took me so darn long to get the tension right.

    Chicksands itself is pretty cool however it rained all day so the 4X track and some jumps were shut. I have to say I was expecting more but we may go again before the holidays are over.
     
  21. Neal

    Neal Premium

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    7,727
    How about a link to that tool set! Buy it!

    Although I haven't got it a good book is meant to be Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance and they also do a road bike version. Another good and free source of info for working on bikes is the Park Tool repair help website. Also if you do need to buy bearings then this website sells pretty much any size bearing in a variety of qualities much cheaper than specific bike places.

    Also as a general recommendation Rock N Roll grease and lubes are brilliant and well worth getting if you're going to be doing any work on your bike.

    I think you got off very lightly helped by you having the sense to tie the bike on with rope. I'll certainly be extra careful next time I rack my bike up.

    I hadn't heard of Quicksands before but it looks pretty awesome, bit too far for me though...besides I'd only end up breaking bones because just like Woody Harrelson I can't jump.
    Glad to help, I was in Halfords yesterday and had a look at the latest Carrera Vulcan Disc Spec and although I prefer red to blue it does look way better than my bike, the frame tubing is more square than oval and the forks look better in white.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2010
  22. ExigeEvan

    ExigeEvan Premium

    Messages:
    17,188
    That's the sort of thing I'm on about. Half hours work, $20. The guy fitting it may be experienced, but I doubt he did more than a few days course on bicycle repair to be qualified.

    http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/...5_categoryId_242558_langId_-1?cm_vc=IOV4PLPZ1


    I'll stick to free sources of info, thanks for the link :tup:
    Thanks! :tup:
     
  23. boiltheocean

    boiltheocean Premium

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    7,756
    Once you've fitted a chain once your qualified. Don't push the pin all the way out though, it's a right pain in the ass to put a pin in.
     
  24. Neal

    Neal Premium

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    7,727
    Or just get a SRAM Powerlink chain, haven't got one myself but will do when I need a replacement.

    Changing a motorbike chain without the proper tools is a job and a half but can be done with an angle grinder and a hammer :D

     
  25. ExigeEvan

    ExigeEvan Premium

    Messages:
    17,188
    So the tool kit was a dud. Returning it tonite because the cassette locking ring isn't the right size to fit my big.

    So, I need a shopping list of tools to buy.
    -Cassette locking tool.
    -Chain whip.
    -Adjustable or Cartridge bottom bracket tool.
    -Crank removal took.
     
  26. Neal

    Neal Premium

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    7,727
    Assuming it's Campagnolo > £5.19 cassette & BB tool http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/LifeLine_Campagnolo_Cassette_And_BB_Removal_Tool/5360031520/

    £5.99 chain whip http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=10184

    Bottom brackets come in many different types so wouldn't like to suggest one.

    Assuming square taper cranks > £5.19 crank extractor http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/LifeLine_Crank_Removal_Tool/5360031496/
     
  27. opladener

    opladener

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  28. AgusBmxArg

    AgusBmxArg

    Messages:
    97
    Took this picture today.
    So happy with my new stem, tires, and seatpost (integrated pivotal wedge system, there is no clamp in the frame)

    [​IMG]
     
  29. exigeracer

    exigeracer

    Messages:
    5,991
    Schwiing!! Nice set-up indeed. Get some decent pedals with any form of foot retention; you're missing out on half your cadence!
     
  30. slowman

    slowman

    Messages:
    754
    Location:
    United States
    The Schwinn is the one I ride most frequently. The Mongoose gets ridden anytime that I'm taking a trip that will not have me leaving the bike unattended at any point, lol. These are both parked for the winter at this point. Just too cold.

    1981 Mongoose Motomag.

    http://bmxmuseum.com/bikes/mongoose/43686

    Here's my 1981 Schwinn Predator as I've been riding it, this is my "daily".

    http://bmxmuseum.com/bikes/schwinn/43113
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2011