TVR Griffith : 200mph,1200 kg and 0–60mph in less then 4 secs

  • Thread starter RocZX
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^Yeah me too.

We have been let down by TVR news so many times. Lotus promised us a slew on new models which all turned out to be nonsense and they are in better shape!

I really hope they still look bonkers, the magazine render that's doing the rounds looks terrible and bland.
 
Ground effect might be a problem. I mean, underbody flow management is fine, and diffusers seem to make a small difference to road cars (at road speeds), but "proper" ground effect, with an externally sealed underbody area? I don't know if that's going to work on our bumpy roads, but at least TVRs might retain their fearsome reputation... :P
 
So, TVR WILL return. I never understanded how they got bankrupt. Anyway, I hope this new car is interesting.
 
A Griffith and Cerbera revival would be the best bet. Both iconic without being too OTT for a returning brand.
 
Ground effect might be a problem. I mean, underbody flow management is fine, and diffusers seem to make a small difference to road cars (at road speeds), but "proper" ground effect, with an externally sealed underbody area? I don't know if that's going to work on our bumpy roads, but at least TVRs might retain their fearsome reputation... :P
I don't expect they mean "ground effect" in the 1970s F1 car sense. Ground effect is technically any negative lift generated by underbody aerodynamics. Several supercars on sale today generate usable downforce that way.
 
I don't expect they mean "ground effect" in the 1970s F1 car sense. Ground effect is technically any negative lift generated by underbody aerodynamics. Several supercars on sale today generate usable downforce that way.
That's what I'm hoping they meant. But it's a nice emotive term all the same, isn't it? ;)

Still, downforce on a TVR? Sacre bleu! :D
 
Hasn't TVR been "returning" ever since that Russian playboy took over? They announce every year that they're coming back yet fail to do so..
 
TVR Taking Deposits For New Sports Car

MotorAuthority
Here's the word from TVR's operations director John Chasey:

"We've been totally blown away by the reaction to the new car. Our phone lines and online enquiry system went into meltdown when the news was announced, and we decided that we must begin to bring a structure to the enquiries and build a delivery pipeline well in advance of production."

Potential buyers will be able to place deposits of £5,000 (approximately $7,800) to secure a car from the first year of production starting July 7, and in a nod to the brand's history, members of the TVR Car Club will be able to reserve one for £2,500 (approximately $3,900). No technical specs are available at this time, but we know with Gordon Murray helping with the project, and a Cosworth V-8 under the hood, the product of this union should be spectacular indeed.

In keeping with the brand's bareknuckle tradition, the cars will reportedly be raw, driver-focused machines. So don't expect to see a state-of-the-art dual-clutch gearbox, hybrid systems, or electronic nannies. The key ingredients here will be a lightweight chassis, a high-horsepower engineand a third pedal.

In other words, this beefy Brit will be closer to a first-gen Viper than a McLaren P1.

Of course, there have been some false starts in the push to bring TVR out of hibernation, and we have more questions than answers right now. But as soon as we know more, you will too
MotorAuthority
 
TVR Taking Deposits For New Sports Car
Here's the word from TVR's operations director John Chasey:

"We've been totally blown away by the reaction to the new car. Our phone lines and online enquiry system went into meltdown when the news was announced, and we decided that we must begin to bring a structure to the enquiries and build a delivery pipeline well in advance of production."

Potential buyers will be able to place deposits of £5,000 (approximately $7,800) to secure a car from the first year of production starting July 7, and in a nod to the brand's history, members of the TVR Car Club will be able to reserve one for £2,500 (approximately $3,900). No technical specs are available at this time, but we know with Gordon Murray helping with the project, and a Cosworth V-8 under the hood, the product of this union should be spectacular indeed.

In keeping with the brand's bareknuckle tradition, the cars will reportedly be raw, driver-focused machines. So don't expect to see a state-of-the-art dual-clutch gearbox, hybrid systems, or electronic nannies. The key ingredients here will be a lightweight chassis, a high-horsepower engineand a third pedal.

In other words, this beefy Brit will be closer to a first-gen Viper than a McLaren P1.

Of course, there have been some false starts in the push to bring TVR out of hibernation, and we have more questions than answers right now. But as soon as we know more, you will too

Does anyone know of a single case where this financial strategy has worked in the automotive realm? Is it right to use product buyers as investors under the thinly-veiled auspices of a "pre-order"? I would feel kind of foolish putting a deposit down on a car that clearly is not fully developed, especially with that money going towards a company notorious for financial problems. It's not like you are actually investing in the company. I like TVRs, but the name seems cursed by horrible business practice.
 
Does anyone know of a single case where this financial strategy has worked in the automotive realm?

Oh, I think you'd be surprised how often this happens for 'desirable' vehicles. You think Ferrari would build FXXs if they didn't have money in the bank from the buyers?

I would feel kind of foolish putting a deposit down on a car that clearly is not fully developed, especially with that money going towards a company notorious for financial problems.

Very smart. The Jaguar XJ220 is the posterboy for when this kind of situation goes fully TU. Marketing execs in the UK auto industry are still wary of promoting vehicles like this even now.

In a nutshell, 'investors' in the late 1980s early 90s super-/classic-car bubble put deposits on XJ220s when they saw the prototype. The car was a long time in gestation, and in the meantime the investment bubbles burst and a lot of the people who wanted to buy didn't have the money 'spare' to commit. And classic/performance car values were in free-fall too. Broke weasels (and their cunning lawyers) said the XJ220 wasn't the long, well-proportioned 4WD V12 powered beast they 'really wanted'. "No, it's a short V6 twin-turbo 2WD", they said, "Not what I ordered - give me my money back."

Fortunately, Jaguar/JaguarSport had a watertight legal case and the pink pin-stripe shirt brigade had to swallow it. The negative publicity surrounding the whole thing (alongside the unfortunately timed greenlighting of the XJR-15**) meant that quite a few marketing & PR staff were taken out back and given a jolly good thrashing.

** Proper petrolhead buyers who visited the manufacturing facility of the XJ220 during the early days of the XJR-15 manufacture would ask questions about the screaming V12 noises emanating for cars being moved around site by employees - and were more interested in them than the XJ220. Some of the wealthier ones could afford them too. After far too many customer enquiries to Jaguar from such visitors, the factory staff were advised that "During future XJ220 customer visits, all XJR-15s should be covered and starting/moving the cars is prohibited."
 
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Post invalidated for the use of "totes". And that isn't happening...stap just stap.
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I remember the previous owners of TVR making similar noises about pre orders, new models. They also had a new logo which I thought looked horrible.

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New TVR is already sold out for 2017
Rejuvenated British sports car maker TVR is flying high. Just months after announcing the brand's revival, new director John Chasey confirms the new V8-powered, rear-wheel drive sports car (which we haven't seen yet) is entirely sold out for 2017.

Chasey describes the recent developments of TVR as a rollercoaster ride: "We began to take deposits in June purely because we had so much clear demand and potential customers. Here we are only a few weeks later announcing this remarkable order take".

Potential buyers were asked to put a £5,000 deposit down just six weeks ago, and now all 250 examples stated for build and delivery in 2017 have been accounted for. TVR claims that those wanting still wanting to order won't see their completed cars until 2018, as production numbers are slowly ramped up.
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I suppose the car had been shown to those who ordered them.
More likely a few sketches were shown and some big names were dropped to customers. I mean, who can resist Gordon Murray and Cosworth?
 
Stupid stupid people, the production really could go 50/50 at this point. Unless they were shown at the very least a working prototype I would not put any money down. Plus the new car is a massive disappointment stylistically (only going by mock up's at this point) to the old models, it's not crazy enough.

As for Gordon Murray, oh please... they stick his name on every auto comeback.
 
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Stupid stupid people, the production really could go 50/50 at this point. Unless they were shown at the very least a working prototype I would not put any money down. Plus the new car is a massive disappointment stylistically (only going by mock up's at this point) to the old models, it's not crazy enough.

I'm guessing the people that put down the deposit probably won't miss a few thousand euros if it goes bust.

As for Gordon Murray, oh please... they stick his name on every auto comeback.

I don't get the obsession with Murray, I love the F1, but other than that it's not like he's been turning out amazing designs like other highly regarded designers.
 
I'm guessing the people that put down the deposit probably won't miss a few thousand euros if it goes bust.

Exactly, for all the cachet TVRs are (comparatively) cheap. Even if TVR made no bones about the risks of early preorders (aka speculative investments) I suspect they'd still get plenty of takers.
 
I don't get the obsession with Murray, I love the F1, but other than that it's not like he's been turning out amazing designs like other highly regarded designers.
That's just it. He doesn't need to churn out anything else. As long as the F1 stood at the top of the supercar podium & will likely become the next 250 GTO in 10-20 years, that's all his resume needs.
 
I don't get the obsession with Murray, I love the F1, but other than that it's not like he's been turning out amazing designs like other highly regarded designers.

Neither do I, you make one bloody car and trade on it for the rest of your life! All his other stuff has been Meh.
 
Neither do I, you make one bloody car and trade on it for the rest of your life! All his other stuff has been Meh.
To be fair, he was also a reasonable F1 car designer and the LCC Rocket is often rated highly on the race occasions it's tested.

But yes, there's still rather more hype to him than there is output.
 
He did work as an engineer in F1 for 37 years, and you do tend to pick up a few skills that way. And apart from the F1 and LCC Rocket, he also had a hand in the SLR McLaren, and of course the T25 and T27.

I would agree, however, that he is far more hyped than need be; there are many engineers out there with more impressive CVs.
 
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