You Can Actually Sit Inside This Full-Size LEGO McLaren Senna

Discussion in 'Cars in General' started by GTPNewsWire, Mar 26, 2019.

  1. GTPNewsWire

    GTPNewsWire Contributing Writer

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  2. RedRockValley

    RedRockValley

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    Ouch.
     
  3. Joey D

    Joey D Premium

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    It has some sort of metal substructure right? If not I'm amazed the doors don't collapse under their own weight when they open up. Unless of course it's glued together, which is probably is if McLaren is transporting it all over the place.
     
  4. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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    As much as it hurts to step on a LEGO, why the heck would anyone elect to sit on them?
     
  5. iCyCo

    iCyCo

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    Remember when LEGOs were children toys?
     
  6. Famine

    Famine Administrator

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    "LEGO" is a company name, not an item. An individual piece is a LEGO brick (or "element") and several of them are LEGO bricks (or "elements").

    There's a full carbon-fiber seat straight from the road car in it.
     
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  7. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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    LEGO brick then...and there I go making an ass of myself by commenting on an article I haven't read again. I really ought to stop doing that.
     
  8. whereSTheFUhd

    whereSTheFUhd

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    No, if you wish to be strictly pedantic about it, which arguably your statement very much indicates, Lego or Legos can indeed be used to refer to any items in the general shape and form of the product produced under the trademarked name/brand of LEGO, if that is indeed the commonly used vernacular - which it clearly is, owing to the fact that you have to strive to correct someone with LEGO's boilerplate corporate 'trademark-protectionary' response to such 'misusage' of the term, despite the lack of any ambiguity in the understanding of his usage. The fact is, all you are doing is parroting their corporate spiel.

    Language serves at the altar of, and is dictated by, the ability to express ideas, not the other way around. And, more to the point, corporations certainly do not dictate common language, de jure. Hence their incessant worry that it becomes used in a manner that weakens their claim to trademark rights - particularly, since LEGO's patent has long since expired, allowing others to offer their own branded products of the ever recognizable bricks.

    In fact, despite all of their guidance in regards to the do's & don'ts (or dos & don'ts or do's & don't's, pick your style) regarding their brand name, every major editor, style guide, and journalistic outlet agrees on such matters, which is to disregard companies' guidances in regards to their names when their names disregard the normal style standards - e.g., Lego, instead of LEGO.

    In other words, say and use it however the oof you want, so long as it doesn't conflict with commonly accepted practices, thereby impinging on the ability to efficiently and effectively express ideas. As far as I can see, I did not see any such instance.
     
  9. Famine

    Famine Administrator

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    And yet still, LEGO (or "Lego" if you prefer) is a company name and not an item. You can say "a Lego" and "Legos" (or "a LEGO" and "LEGOs", as the users above did, if you wish to chide them for their corporate-speak capitalisation) if you so desire, and it does seem to a peculiarly North American affectation, but they have always been bricks (and latterly "elements", although this came with the advent of LEGO Technic) right from the moment of Christiansen's first patent for a "Toy Building Brick" back in 1958. Block, for similar reasons, is also acceptable.


    LEGO's official terminology would have you believe that the little people are called "Mini-figs", which... no.
     
  10. Tornado

    Tornado

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    Isn't so bad as long as you don't break the skin. Then you'll need a band-aid or kleenex.
     
  11. Famine

    Famine Administrator

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    That's why you should always hoover the floor after playing with them.
     
  12. Danoff

    Danoff Premium

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    Ah genericide. My favorite is hook-and-loop fasteners.
     
  13. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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    As a public service I ought to xerox this page and pass it around.
     
  14. Famine

    Famine Administrator

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    This is giving me a headache. I need an aspirin.

    Amusingly, that one and "hoover" are the only ones so far that really work with the UK population; the major plaster brand in the UK is "elastoplast", but we just say plaster. Tissues are tissues, and a photocopier copies.
     
  15. Moglet

    Moglet Premium

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    If this really is a public service message it should be announced over a tannoy
     
  16. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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    Then it may be time to relocate. I know a realtor you can talk to.
     
  17. Famine

    Famine Administrator

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    No idea what that means. I may have to google it - although it's all becoming a bit of a dumpster fire.
     
  18. neema_t

    neema_t Premium

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    I like to think all 42 modelers spent the first 200-300 hours looking at the instructions and collectively going "it looks nothing like it, did we make a mistake?"

    Also do we know if that time given is man hours or build time from first to last brick?
     
  19. Slapped

    Slapped Premium

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    Don't knock it, I'm kind of kinky like that ;)
     
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  20. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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    How do they keep it clean?
     
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  21. kikie

    kikie Premium

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    How in gods name are they doing that? I wouldn't know where to begin.
     
  22. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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    Brick-by-brick.
     
  23. Famine

    Famine Administrator

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    Pure build time - it took 5,000 hours in total, including the planning.
     
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  24. TomBrady

    TomBrady

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    I just want the real car. Best hypercar ever made in my opinion.
     
  25. Liquid

    Liquid Premium

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    I've been enjoying this with a drink from my thermos.
     
  26. Famine

    Famine Administrator

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    In a jacuzzi, I hope.
     
  27. Robin

    Robin Premium

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    I'm surprised they didn't go the same route as the Veyron regarding the bodywork, i.e. that element that curves around the bodywork better. But I guess maybe that's more Technic than standard Lego. Also they didn't do the steering wheel in Lego on this one for some reason.
     
  28. Shaun

    Shaun Premium

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    I'd hope as a minimum wearing your Speedo's.
     
  29. kikie

    kikie Premium

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    A Lego jacuzzi!


    Although this Lego Senna is beautiful I'd rather sit in a real Senna. :D