2018 Verizon IndyCar SeriesOpen Wheel 

EDK

WRS Admin
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GTP_EDK
The team is posting updates on Twitter, and this was just released.

Fingers crossed that these injuries do not severely impact his mobility and quality of life. Returning to a race car has to be a secondary consideration, at this point.

 
6,263
Canada
Canada
Filipe Baby hits out at safety standards in Infycar, saying organizers are doing nothing to enhance driver safety


As the first reply suggest, Massa seems to be under informed about the number of safety firsts in Indycar’s history, including HANS, Safer Barriers, a safety/pace car, and more.

Personally, I think only drivers who have driven in IndyCar themselves should share their opinions of the safety standards. Massa’s opinion on the matter is no different from any other random on twitter.
 

Northstar

The Original Party Worm
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RokkitShipp
Neither series is a good example of being forward thinking safety wise considering both have a long history of being reactive instead of proactive in the safety department.
 

Northstar

The Original Party Worm
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RokkitShipp
One thing that slipped my mind is that the FIA is working with a much bigger budget which makes researching and implementing things much easier. IndyCar on the other hand has at times in the recent past seemed on the verge of collapse, so I doubt they have a huge R&D budget.
 
1,405
United States
California
WeaselKing707
N/A
One thing that slipped my mind is that the FIA is working with a much bigger budget which makes researching and implementing things much easier. IndyCar on the other hand has at times in the recent past seemed on the verge of collapse, so I doubt they have a huge R&D budget.

Graham Rahal brought this up in his Twitter response to Massa's comment.
 
3,942
Canada
Brandon, MB
Silver-Arrows21
One thing that slipped my mind is that the FIA is working with a much bigger budget which makes researching and implementing things much easier. IndyCar on the other hand has at times in the recent past seemed on the verge of collapse, so I doubt they have a huge R&D budget.

One of the sim racing Youtubers I follow, Empty Box, raised a good point: it'd make sense if Indycar and NASCAR pooled their resources together to try and make a joint task force in safety, specifically in regards to catch fencing safety, but probably other things as well, considering that these two leagues have the most to lose with regards to catch fencing and general safety in ovals.

But of course, that won't happen because NASCAR doesn't give a **** about safety unless it's absolutely needed. You bring up the point that Indycar is reactive in terms of safety, well, Indycar look like cheetahs compared to how lackluster NASCAR is in terms of bringing in safety measures. And the FIA just don't give a ****, whether that be from thinking that the two American leagues can hold their own, or thinking that the supposed 'dumb Yankee tech' is beneath them, I don't know.
 

Northstar

The Original Party Worm
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RokkitShipp
it'd make sense if Indycar and NASCAR pooled their resources

Which is exactly what happened with the SAFER barriers.

Indycar look like cheetahs compared to how lackluster NASCAR is in terms of bringing in safety measures.

There have been 4 deaths in IndyCar since Earnhardt's death.
 
332
United States
Bristow, VA
spacecowboy73
spacecowboy73
There have been 4 deaths in IndyCar since Earnhardt's death.

I'm not sure I understand your point, Indycar racing is inherently more dangerous than NASCAR.

But of course, that won't happen because NASCAR doesn't give a **** about safety unless it's absolutely needed. You bring up the point that Indycar is reactive in terms of safety, well, Indycar look like cheetahs compared to how lackluster NASCAR is in terms of bringing in safety measures. And the FIA just don't give a ****, whether that be from thinking that the two American leagues can hold their own, or thinking that the supposed 'dumb Yankee tech' is beneath them, I don't know.

Also I wouldn't expect NASCAR to go beyond the safety requirements for their series to accommodate a different one.
 

Northstar

The Original Party Worm
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RokkitShipp
I'm not sure I understand your point, Indycar racing is inherently more dangerous than NASCAR.

That NASCAR isn't as slow to adopt new safety standards as he claimed, if anything it's the opposite. NASCAR had 14 deaths in the span of 1970-2001 while top level american open wheel only had 11 in that same timeframe. Since than there have been no deaths in NASCAR despite some accidents that probably should have been fatal while IndyCar has had 4.

NASCAR (14): Talmadge Prince (1970), Friday Hassler (1972), Larry Smith (1973), Tiny Lund (1975), Ricky Knotts (1980), Bruce Jacobi (1983), Terry Schoonover (1984), Rick Baldwin (1986), Grant Adcox (1989), J.D. McDuffie (1991), Neil Bonnett (1994), Rodney Orr (1994), Kenny Irwin Jr. (2000), Dale Earnhardt (2001)

AOW (16): Jim Malloy (1972), Bob Criss (1973), Art Pollard (1973), Swede Savage (1973), Gordon Smiley (1982), Jim Hickman (1982), Jovy Marcelo (1992), Scott Brayton (1996), Jeff Krosnoff (1996), Gonzalo Rodriguez (1999), Greg Moore (1999), Tony Renna (2003), Paul Dana (2006), Dan Wheldon (2011), Justin Wilson (2015)
 
332
United States
Bristow, VA
spacecowboy73
spacecowboy73
I agree with the overall point you are making but I don't think driver deaths per series is a good metric to use when deciding which series is faster or slower to adopt safety standards.
 
6,463
United Kingdom
Southampton
RacingAtHome
One of the sim racing Youtubers I follow, Empty Box, raised a good point: it'd make sense if Indycar and NASCAR pooled their resources together to try and make a joint task force in safety, specifically in regards to catch fencing safety, but probably other things as well, considering that these two leagues have the most to lose with regards to catch fencing and general safety in ovals.
This makes too much sense. Therefore, it won't happen.
 
1,472
United States
United States
I think to get a starting point, you could calculate the number of "severe" crashes (i.e. not clipping a wall and snapping your rear suspension on a street circuit) and compare that to driver deaths. All series today are amazingly safe when compared to where we've come from. If anything, the lack of deaths in motorsport stand to highlight why people get so up-in-arms when they do happen.

You see the same thing in the general population, where violent crime is down something like 50% over the past 20 years, yet people are much more actively vocal about it now than they were 20 years ago. As we eliminate something, its occurences become more jarring, even if they're more rare.
 
1,778
Australia
Australia
The bend of the start finish line at Long Beach is one that worries me. It wouldn’t take much for a car to be launched off the back of another similar Franchitti’s Houston crash. The temporary catchfencing doesn’t really seem to be as safe as the permanent catch fencing at the ovals either. Franchitti’s crash threw much more debris over the fence than what is usually. Wouldn’t even want to think of the outcome if such an accident was to happen at Long Beach.
 
1,837
United States
Connecticut
FutureF1
Kudos to Dixon for keeping himself going... but I can help but feel like a huge chunk of luck has helped him to where he is right now... with the yellows screwing Rossi over and aiding Dixon.
 
1,405
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WeaselKing707
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Wild race today. It makes me glad that Portland is back on the schedule.

Now of course there's is a two-week wait before the last snooze-fest finale at Sonoma, which of course will be replaced by the equally snooze-worthy Laguna Seca next year. I'm expecting Scott Dixon to win his fifth title unless he gets wrecked on the first lap going up the hill into Turn 2, but even then you never know...
 
6,463
United Kingdom
Southampton
RacingAtHome
Wild race today. It makes me glad that Portland is back on the schedule.

Now of course there's is a two-week wait before the last snooze-fest finale at Sonoma, which of course will be replaced by the equally snooze-worthy Laguna Seca next year. I'm expecting Scott Dixon to win his fifth title unless he gets wrecked on the first lap going up the hill into Turn 2, but even then you never know...
In fairness, I think Laguna Seca will be about as good as Mid Ohio. One curved straight and other possible but not obvious places to pass.
 
1,837
United States
Connecticut
FutureF1
Damn... I think this might be the race we look at as the deciding point in this championship. Agreed that Rossi messed up Detroit, but this was a huge blow considering that yellow converted a 5 point lead into a 29 point deficit...
 

Dotini

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CR80_Shifty
Portland, what a blast! Maybe the best race of the season for sheer topsy-turvy excitement. The spectator turnout was awesome and TV coverage excellent. Congrats to owner Bobby Rahal and hero driver Takuma Sato, age 41, now a winner on oval, road and street.
 
332
United States
Bristow, VA
spacecowboy73
spacecowboy73
Damn... I think this might be the race we look at as the deciding point in this championship. Agreed that Rossi messed up Detroit, but this was a huge blow considering that yellow converted a 5 point lead into a 29 point deficit...

Yeah Townsend Bell called Dixon's "save" the Miracle on Dirt. :lol:
 
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