British Phrases That Baffle The Rest Of The World

Discussion in 'The Rumble Strip' started by imported_rik19, Oct 3, 2017.

  1. Renrag39

    Renrag39 Premium

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    Bishy barnaby. They keep the aphids at bay ;)
     
  2. Liquid

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    British phrases that baffle other British people:

    Breakfast, dinner and tea.
    Butty.

    There's no such thing as lunch, there's no such thing as a sandwich. Don't @ me.
     
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  3. daan

    daan Moderator

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    Breakfast, lunch and dinner.
    Piece.
     
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  4. TheCracker

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    Lunch and Tea. Breakfast is for wimps.
     
  5. Danoff

    Danoff Premium

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    Funny

    [over analysis] Actually, the first Guy Fawkes celebration is of a foiled attempt, not a successful one. And the second one is about a movie where someone is trying to topple an oppressive government and announces a year in advance that he's going to blow up a building to make sure that fair warning was given to get out before it goes off. Neither of those really fit. [/over analysis]
     
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  6. Lizard

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    Breakfast, lunch, dinner for me.

    Or if I feel posh, breakfast, luncheon, supper. And of course afternoon tea with scones and jam. And it's scons not s cones.

    Also it's a sandwich, unless it's chips, always a chip buttie.
     
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  7. photonrider

    photonrider

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    Should you consider yourself lucky? Especially living in a culture of 'class'. ;)



    "In America they haven't used it for years …." :lol:
     
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  8. EamerRed

    EamerRed

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    When I travelled last year most Americans thought I was Australian :odd:

    One which isn't commonplace across Britain is adding 'to' at the end of 'where is it?'. Being from the south west and going to uni in Plymouth I'd say 'where is the bar to?, or where is x to?'. Confused all of the northerners and some of the south easterners right up as they'd never heard it.
     
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  9. 05XR8

    05XR8

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    Since living in Australia:

    Breakfast, lunch & tea= Get something in ya, smoko & beer o'clock

    I guess, being from the USA, British sayings that get me are those "Six and sevens and three elevens" sayings. The scene from Austin Powers summed it up. Love that stuff.
     
  10. Liquid

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    "Where to are you from?"
    "Where to are you going?"
    Where to is it?"

    That's very South Welsh. We don't have that up in Gogland.
     
  11. TexRex

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    I have to admit to deriving enjoyment out of "half-inch" and the fact that few people know what I'm talking about when I use it.

    While he was generally well spoken, when he was either angry or when he got longer in the tooth, my grandfather would revert to more cockney speech.

    One incident and phrase that still makes me grin when I think back was having taken about half of a tin of oatmeal cookies my grandmother made into my bedroom one afternoon--it was four or five of less than a dozen. I was doing my homework that evening and I heard a slamming noise in the front of the house, followed by: "Oi!! Who 'alf-inched my damn biscuits!?" I suspect had I been a little younger, belt would have met butt. They weren't his per se, but maybe he expected more to be left.
     
  12. W3HS

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    Despite being cockneys I’ve never heard either of my grandparents use rhyming slang other than in imitation of others.

    It’s true the I fear my wife wouldn’t understand 90% of what they’re saying due to their accent, cockney grammar and a lack of pronunciation. Some of my favourites of my grandfather’s include “Boi’ the kittle, Joyce” and “Naaa’days cars is put ‘geva b’ row’b’ts”*. Genuine prols are my grandparents, salt of the earth people lol.

    * It’s really hard to express some of the unique cockney phonemes in writing.
     
  13. TexRex

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    It was particularly difficult to understand him near the end, before he went quiet. Between speaking softly, hardly moving his lips and, sadly, the dementia...it was bad. I've wondered if on some level he realized nobody understood him and that's why he stopped talking.

    Edit: Boy...that did a number on the happy memories.
     
  14. TenEightyOne

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    Breakfast, dinner, tea! :D

    That's what my grandmother would have called "red leg time"...
     
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  15. Famine

    Famine Administrator

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    What about second breakfast?
     
  16. Lizard

    Lizard Premium

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    Oh you mean the mid morning snack my butler brings with a pot of tea dear chap? I call that elevenses.
     
  17. W3HS

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    I don’t think he knows about second breakfast, Famine.
     
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  18. TenEightyOne

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    It's all "braykus" to me anyway :)
     
  19. Zychotic1

    Zychotic1

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    I just want to know the untranslated parts of the very Jibberishtic conversation between Austin and his Father in the 3rd Austin Powers movie.... I still havn't figured out what caused the chick to poo on a turtle
     
  20. TexRex

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    While it doesn't address some of the more peculiar language, I did get a kick out of this bit on the differences between American english and English english:



    But then I enjoy that contributor. One of my favorites (or favourites, if you prefer) was one on the completely unrelated subject* of "who" versus "whom."

    *Hence the link.