British Phrases That Baffle The Rest Of The World

Discussion in 'The Rumble Strip' started by imported_rik19, Oct 3, 2017.

  1. imported_rik19

    imported_rik19

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    Have a look at these two guys, pretty funny these two..:)

     
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  2. Jordan

    Jordan Administrator

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  3. kikie

    kikie Premium

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    Good job posting this and making the English language even more difficult and less comprehensive.


    >>>> :lol:

    :D
     
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  4. Lizard

    Lizard Premium

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    This is summed up by the one and only 'cheeky Nando's'

    When an American gets confused by what a cheeky Nando's is, it is a British person's responsibility to explain it using as much British slang as humanly possible and thus leaving the American even more confused.
     
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  5. Robin

    Robin Premium

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    I can imagine Americans, or pretty much anyone on the planet, trying to decipher the lingo on a programme like Love Island...

    Melt
    Muggy
    Pied
    Grafting
    Sort
    Shade
    Extra
    Stick It On

    All not what you think they mean! :lol:
     
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  6. Lizard

    Lizard Premium

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    Don't forget regional words haha. Try giving an American, Yorkshire, Scottish, Geordi or Scouse words to try.

    Also

    Minging
    Rank
    Quid
    Corker
    Gaffer
    Miffed
    Nob
    Numpty
    Old Bill
    Baccy
    The British meaning of pissed.
    The British meaning of fag or fags.
    Gabber
    Her Majesty’s Pleasure
    Legless (not sure if US people use that)
    Minted
    Off One’s Trolley
    Shirty
    Tosser
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2017
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  7. imported_rik19

    imported_rik19

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    Check these aswell,
     
  8. Robin

    Robin Premium

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    On Big Brother with Sarah Harding and Chad Johnson,

    "Stop taking the piss Chad!"

    "I don't know what that means..."

    "Stop taking the mickey!!!

    "I still don't know what that means..."

    :lol:
     
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  9. kikie

    kikie Premium

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    British English has slang? :eek:

    I thought slang is a typical American English thing. You know, street talk and stuff.
     
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  10. Liquid

    Liquid Premium

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    Rhyming slang too.

    Wipe that look off your boat, check your kettle, sit on your Aris and learn all about it. Plenty of people rabbit on like this.

    Don't be shocked by it and get too Brahms.
     
  11. daan

    daan Moderator

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  12. Famine

    Famine Administrator

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    I swear down, that's proper canny like.
     
  13. Jump_Ace

    Jump_Ace Staff Emeritus

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    Please help me understand this one; Tosser. A friend here on GTP called me that once, she is from the UK and I'm dying to know what that translates to, roughly.

    'Don't be a tosser.' she said. I was like whaaa---hmmm.....???? :lol:

    Jerome
     
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  14. imported_rik19

    imported_rik19

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    tosser = idiot, politely putting it..:)
     
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  15. Liquid

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    Tossing is the same as jerking.
     
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  16. imported_rik19

    imported_rik19

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    I didnt want to put the w word... the wan*** word..:)
     
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  17. Lizard

    Lizard Premium

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    It's the same as calling someone a wanker.

    Rule here is if it's spelled correct and it isn't censored, and you are not directly insulting someone then it's fine I believe.



    More.

    Chaps.
    Me old mucker (northern)
    lads
    Archbishop of Banterbury :p
    And on that note, banter
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2017
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  18. Sage Ages

    Sage Ages

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    Edit: Looked some of them up. Most of them aren’t exactly appropriate.
     
  19. Danoff

    Danoff Premium

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    "Bob's your uncle" is British? I did not know that.
     
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  20. TenEightyOne

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    Only yesterday I bouled a tansad full of kelt down a tenfoot for our lass.
     
  21. kikie

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    Heard this on Poirot. You know Hercule Poirot; Agatha Christie:

    Fancy a breather?

    Not really difficult to understand and probably not even slang but I found it a strange way to ask if one wanted a few minutes of rest to catch their breath.
     
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  22. Lizard

    Lizard Premium

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    One that I had never heard of before last year of uni actually.

    Peak, as a word for well that's crap.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2017
  23. 1241Penguin

    1241Penguin Premium

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    Not exactly phrases, but I think this is worth sharing:

    Language warning

     
  24. Liquid

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    Supposedly it's because Arthur Balfour, Prime Minister 1902-1905, was, despite his experience and talent, given that post due to the influence of his uncle Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, a three time former Prime Minister himself and Marquess of Salisbury.

    So things happen at the end (because) Bob's your uncle.

    ---

    I have an interesting time enough with my Irish friends; since moving to Slovakia most of my friends have been Irish, funnily enough. As well as learning that words such as banshee, boycott, brogue, hooligan and slogan are of Irish origin, they also have unique syntax and vocabulary talking about "your one" or "your man", putting so at the end of a sentence, talking about getting messages to put in the press and a few idioms like "Get the boat!"
     
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  25. W3HS

    W3HS Premium

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    I’ve learnt a lot of South African slang from a mate at work, not solid Afrikaans mind, just a mild dosage of standard English mixed with some Saffa slang. Guys are oaks, traffic lights are robots and everyone is “your boy...” at the beginning of the sentence whether I know them or not.

    Typical sentence might be, “Your boy Dave ran the robots. That oak is insane.”
     
  26. INEEDNAWZZZ

    INEEDNAWZZZ

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    Another regional one round where I live; 'duck' as a form of affection i.e. 'you okay duck?'
     
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  27. W3HS

    W3HS Premium

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    Sometime one gets a shout from a friend to say “I’m shaking a leg back to me drum for a ruby and a few Nelsons” and one feel inclined to join.
     
  28. Wiegert

    Wiegert Premium

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    Here you'd swap 'duck' with 'cock'. Only ever hear the older generations with ties to the Black Country use that one. Even fewer folks tend to use 'cocker' but usually with more of a "Ludlow" accent. Closer to your typical West Country farmer speak.

    One of my cousins has always had a standard West Midlands accent. Having lived in the south of Shropshire and Worcestershire in recent years he's adopted the local dialect but without the accompanying accent. What's odd is that he incorporates it into his texts, always with the word "Are" rather than "Our" as a prefix when discussing myself, a friend or family member (Are nan = Grandmother).

    I know it's not because of my Irish blood but I find myself dropping a 'so' and the end of a sentence more often than I'd like.
     
  29. INEEDNAWZZZ

    INEEDNAWZZZ

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    Relevant:

    IMG_1280.JPG
     
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  30. Peter.

    Peter.

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    Why do you guys call cigarettes fags? What did they ever do to you?