General Tuning Guide (Updated 1.09)

Discussion in 'GT6 Tuning' started by DolHaus, Jan 16, 2014.

  1. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    gtg2.jpg (Picture and editing by @FussyFez)



    This guide is intended to help you understand the basic ideas involved in tuning a car. Please note that this is only a general guide and should not be taken as gospel, there are many aspects that can change a cars characteristics and I cannot account for all of them. I just want to give people who are new to tuning a sense of what all the parts do and how they can be potentially improved.

    (My Race tuning garage - https://www.gtplanet.net/forum/threads/haus-of-flying-daggers-accepting-requests.301978/

    Drift tuning Garage - https://www.gtplanet.net/forum/threads/drift-haus-tuning-garage.302396/ )

    Printable Version (thanks to @aboe)- https://docs.google.com/document/d/1AcEzaJxvkD0lXa_WnwOygw404oLRWjidaxbjY42EGcg/edit

    Begginers Guide to the Data Logger by @F1Racer68 - https://www.gtplanet.net/forum/threads/gt6-data-logger-a-beginners-guide.318832/

    susp.jpg
    (Picture and editing by @FussyFez)

    Spring Rates -


    Springs are one of the major components of the suspension in any vehicle. Their purpose is to support the weight of the car and absorb bumps. Simple but effective, the spring can be set at various strengths which are measured by how much weight the spring can take before compressing (higher weight = stiffer spring).



    Soft springs:


    Pros: Allows wheels to stay in contact with the road surface over imperfections which helps to maintain grip.

    Cons: Allows body roll in vehicles and encourages weight transfer which can lead to instability during quick or violent directional changes.



    Stiff springs:


    Pros: Minimises body roll therefore making the car more stable and predictable during cornering. It also allows a lower ride height to be used because of the reduced likelihood of bottoming out the suspension.

    Cons: Causes car to skip over bumps which can cause a loss of grip and twitchy, unpredictable handling.



    Spring tuning guide:



    Front Springs -



    Stiff Springs = Increase understeer


    Soft Springs = Decrease understeer



    Rear Springs -



    Stiff Springs = Increase oversteer


    Soft Springs = Decrease oversteer




    General notes:


    Controlling weight shift is very important in GT6, the new physics engine puts much more focus on how the weight moving around the car affects things during the various stages of cornering/accelerating/braking.


    The overall stiffness of springs should always be adjusted to suit the different grip levels of tyres. A car running on Comfort Hard tyres (Less grip = Tyre can handle less load before slipping) will need to run softer overall spring rates compared to a car running on Comfort Soft (More grip = Tyre can handle more load before slipping) to work at optimum efficiency. Its always a compromise between controlling body roll and not transferring too much force (load) to the tyres.


    Road cars usually have a certain level of softness to the springs to cope with real world problems such as poor road surfaces/potholes/speed humps/curbs etc., on a race track this is much less of an issue. When tuning these it is important to first remove this extra body roll by stiffening the springs, put simply the less body roll there is the more speed you can hold through a corner without encountering lateral slip.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2014
  2. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    Ride height -


    The ride height is fairly self explanatory. It determines how high the bottom of your car is from the track when stationary. The general idea is the lower your car sits, the lower your centre of gravity. The lower the centre of gravity, the more stable an object is in motion.


    As a general note, you should avoid using super soft suspension set-ups with extremely lowered ride height as this can cause the suspension to bottom out and become completely ineffective.



    Low Ride height:


    Pros: Lower centre of gravity and reduced weight transfer which means the car is more stable and predictable during cornering.

    Cons: You risk bottoming out the suspension under the load of cornering which can cause unexpected results such as loss of steering and/or grip. The car can drag its belly over uneven ground or curbs which causes resistance that slows you down or causes you to lose control.



    High Ride height:


    Pros: Car has increased ground clearance and is unlikely to bottom out over rough and uneven terrain.

    Cons: Increased weight transfer and a higher centre of gravity makes the car more likely to be overcome by momentum. This leads to undesirable handling characteristics and a general feeling of instability.



    Ride height tuning guide:



    Front ride height -



    Higher than rear = Increase rotation


    Lower than rear = Decrease rotation



    Rear ride height -



    Higher than front = Decrease rotation


    Lower than front = Increase rotation
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2014
  3. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    Dampers -


    Dampers are another important component of modern suspension set-ups. They basically perform the same task as springs but are more adjustable as they allow for adjustments to compression and extension. This is because a spring only has one variable in the form of how hard or sort the spring is to compress, if it takes 10kg of pressure to fully compress a spring then it will recoil with the same force. Dampers are different because you can set how hard it is to compress and how hard it recoils independently. Springs and dampers should be set to complement each other, generally if you use hard springs you should use soft damper settings and vice versa.



    Soft Dampers:


    Pros: Suspension can react quickly to changes in terrain which helps to retain grip by keeping the tire in contact with the road.

    Cons: Speeds up transition to oversteer/understeer depending on overall handling characteristics.



    Stiff Dampers:


    Pros: Slows down transition to oversteer/understeer making the car more predictable

    Cons: Skips over bumps in the terrain because the suspension can't react fast enough which can lead to losing grip or bouncing over curbs.



    Damper tuning guide:



    Front Dampers:



    Stiff = Increase understeer


    Soft = Decrease understeer



    Rear Dampers:



    Stiff = Increase oversteer


    Soft = Decrease oversteer



    General notes:


    Car feels soft and floaty – Increase compression


    Car feels hard and unforgiving – Decrease compression
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2016
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  4. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    Anti-Roll Bars -


    Anti-roll bars are a solid beam that connects the bottom of the suspension on both sides of the car. They are used to keep the geometry of the suspension true and constant as well as helping to strengthen the overall rigidity of the car.



    Soft Anti-Roll Bars:


    Pros: Increased grip due to flex within suspension

    Cons: More dramatic weight transfer from side to side during changes of direction that can lead to understeer/oversteer.



    Stiff Anti-Roll Bars:


    Pros: Reduced lateral weight transfer

    Cons: Can cause unwanted oversteer/understeer due to reduced suspension flex



    Anti-Roll Bar tuning:



    Front:


    Stiff = Increase understeer


    Soft = Decrease understeer



    Rear:



    Stiff = Increase oversteer


    Soft = Decrease oversteer
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2014
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  5. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    lsd.jpg (Picture and editing by @FussyFez)

    Limited Slip Differential:



    The LSD or 'Diff' is the final stage between gearbox and wheels in terms of power delivery. It consists of a central box full of gears that determine which wheel the power is delivered to and with how much force. It can be used to completely change how a car reacts under acceleration and deceleration and forms a very important part of tuning your car.


    High numbers = Locked (power delivered equally to both wheels)

    Low numbers = Open (power delivered to which ever wheel is easier to turn)




    Initial Torque:


    The initial torque is a pre-load setting, it defines the how loose or tight the LSD will be in general. The more open it is the more suddenly it will react to changes in acceleration/deceleration forces, the tighter it is the more consistent it will be.



    Initial Tuning:

    Open (lower values):


    Pros: Improves manoeuvrability

    Cons: Increased instability



    Locked (higher values):


    Pros: Increased stability

    Cons: Reduced manoeuvrability



    Acceleration Sensitivity:

    The acceleration sensitivity basically defines how the driven wheels will act under acceleration. With a locked setting (higher number) both wheels will rotate at the same speed which gives the best straight line acceleration but poor manoeuvrability during corner exit and increases the likely hood of wheel spin or bogging down depending on the cars power levels and overall characteristics. Open settings (lower numbers) allow the wheels to spin at different rates and offer better manoeuverability during exit and reduced wheel spin, the downside is slower straight line acceleration due to the natural tendency of energy to choose the easiest option which means power will be sent to the least useful wheel.


    Acceleration Tuning:


    Open (lower values):


    Pros: Reduces wheel spin when exiting corners

    Cons: Initial turn in is less responsive



    Locked (higher values):


    Pros: Only really suited to drift tunes as it helps to keep oversteer predictable and linear

    Cons: reduced grip and stability



    Deceleration Sensitivity:

    The deceleration sensitivity basically defines how the driven wheels will act under deceleration. With a locked setting (higher number) both wheels will rotate at the same speed which gives the best straight line traction and potentially better braking but makes the car very difficult to rotate during braking. With an open setting (lower number) the wheels can rotate at different speeds giving better rotation but reduced stability and potential braking efficiency.

    Deceleration Tuning:


    Open (lower values):


    Pros: More manoeuvrable under deceleration/braking

    Cons: Reduced stability



    Locked (higher values):


    Pros: Increased Stability when decelerating/braking

    Cons: Increased understeer
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2016
  6. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    1395082047138.jpg

    Camber Settings -

    Used to describe the vertical angle of the wheel in relation to the ground. Negative (-) camber means that the bottom of the wheel sticks out further than the top which generally provides more grip when cornering as it puts the wheel at a better angle to the road. Positive (+) camber is generally only used on agricultural and off-road vehicles and doesn't provide any advantages to a race set-up.

    Contactpatches.jpg


    Camber is quite complicated in the way it works but the basic idea is that running a wheel at an angle to the road will change the way the tyre contacts the road and affects how much stress it can sustain in any particular direction.


    0.0 Contactb.jpg


    Here we see a wheel at 0.0 degrees of camber, the contact patch is wider than it is long which means it can handle more lateral (sideways) forces but less linear (accelerating/braking) forces. This makes it ideal for cornering.


    5.0 Contactb.jpg

    Here we see a wheel with heavy negative camber. The contact patch is now longer than it is wide which makes it better at handling linear (accelerating/braking) forces but worse at handling lateral (sideways) forces. This makes it ideal for accelerating and braking.

    What are the major points to consider when tuning my car with camber?


    Overall aim – We are aiming to use camber to get the best possible contact patch on the road at any given moment. We want it to be leaning on the inside edge of the tyre when travelling in a straight line and spreading the load when cornering to give us the most useful grip when we need it.


    Camber angle – There is no such thing as a perfect angle for all cars and all conditions. Pick a sensible number in relation to the fitted tyres, set it equally at both ends of the car. Take the car for a few laps and see how it performs. Increase or decrease the numbers equally and try again, if it performs better then keep moving in that direction, if it feels worse then try the other way. Once you feel you've found the best number, try adjusting the front and rear independently and look for any improvements. Sometimes the best results will be with equal front and back, sometimes it will be better when they're at vastly different figures, it all depends how your car is setup and what you want it to do.


    Tyres- Different types of tyres work better between certain values in the same way that springs do.


    Active camber: When the suspension is compressed the wheels gain negative camber and conversely during extension they gain positive camber. This means the angles will change constantly as the suspension tries to keep the wheels on the track.


    Ride height - This setting may be called ride height but in this context it should be treated more like the amount of suspension travel. The higher the ride height, the more the suspension geometry will change and add negative camber during compression. The lower the ride height, the more constant the angles are.


    Springs/Dampers/ARB - Much like the ride height, these settings will directly affect how much active camber is gained during compression by controlling the amount of movement in the suspension. As before stiffer settings will reduce the amount of geometry change and softer settings will increase it.


    Toe angle – When we change the angle of a wheel in one axis we affect other settings that also rely on angles to perform. Toe angles may change in feel when camber is applied and may also need adjusting. My general thought would be to reduce toe angle as more camber is applied.


    Track Surface: If the track you are racing on has banked/cambered corners then you may wish to run a little less camber than you would on a flat track in order to maintain your contact patch.


    Rim Size - I'll only mention this briefly as I cannot confirm or deny if it is modelled in the game. The theory is that a the taller tyre sidewall that you would find on a standard size rim is more flexible and easier to deform than the shorter stiffer sidewall you would have on a +2” rim. Always worth checking when you are looking to put the finishing touch on your setup.



    (Research is currently ongoing into the application of camber and I will update the guide as more obvious trends and tuning patterns appear)



    Toe settings -




    Front toe in (+ Slider to the right)


    Pros: Improved straight line stability. Increased mid corner grip

    Cons: Reduced grip on turn in



    Front toe out (- Slider to the left)


    Pros: Increased grip on turn in

    Cons: Less stable at speed. Reduced mid corner grip.



    Rear toe in (+ Slider to the right)


    Pros: Reduced lift off/power oversteer

    Cons: Reduced lift off/power oversteer



    Rear toe out (- Slider to the left)


    Pros: increased lift off/power oversteer

    Cons: increased lift off/power oversteer



    A combination of front toe in (+) and rear toe out (-) can make a car easier to turn, this work well on FF layout cars.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2015
  7. ForeverN00b

    ForeverN00b

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    Outstanding, thank you DolHaus. Seems like a good place to start. Bump. I wouldn't want this to go buried so easily...any experienced GT6 tuners want to comment/expand on this?
     
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  8. Z1-AV69

    Z1-AV69

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    Thank you for your effort. While I don't really disagree, I always find claims like "more oversteer" very misleading. Imho the question is always where? On entry or on exit? Higher rear springs will indeed increase midcorner and exit oversteer, but it will also increase understeer at turn in. Most setup work is actually about shifting turning ability from entry to exit or the other way round. As a result what gives oversteer or understeer in your perception might depend on if you like to apex early or late. If you're learning to tune (or setup, really), my advice would be to look precisely what happens at entry, mid corner and exit and check how each change effects those differently.
     
  9. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    Thank you for taking the time to read it, hope it helps some people get their heads around tuning a little bit so they can get the most out of the game.
     
  10. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    I agree with you entirely, the guide is only supposed to be a basic guide to help people who are new to tuning or to general car mechanics. For a lot of people it can be quite intimidating when they see all the numbers and options involved with tuning in gt6, this guide is just intended to give people a general idea of what they can expect when they start making changes.
    If you want to explain the later stages then feel free to add posts explaining your methods and the thinking behind it, feel free! Please remember to keep it simple as these things tend to be hard to explain without experiencing them first hand.
     
  11. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    (Important: as of update 1.04, camber is not working properly and serves only to reduce grip, avoid changing unless this is your aim)
     
  12. iainoflo85

    iainoflo85

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    FTFY
     
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  13. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    ??
     
  14. iainoflo85

    iainoflo85

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    Fixed that for you.
     
  15. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    Ahh right, thank you lol I thought I'd just make sure it was up to date.
    Its such a shame that camber is broken, it makes such a difference to most cars and is a key element to any set up
     
  16. iainoflo85

    iainoflo85

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    And they got it right in GT5 as well. But like many things in GT6, they've gone backwards rather than forwards.
     
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  17. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    I've got hope, I just think it will take time. We might look back in 6 months time and not remember what we were complaining about!
     
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  18. FussyFez

    FussyFez

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    Great stuff man. Nice and clear. Exactly what is needed for a basic guide.

    :gtpflag:
     
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  19. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    Thanks man, I hope it helps some people. I know it doesn't cover all the little tricks but I wanted something for people just starting out, they're the ones who need the most help
     
  20. Dagger311

    Dagger311

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    Will be using this a lot. Thanks for this.
     
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  21. FussyFez

    FussyFez

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    Indeed, your help with dagger was evident. All it takes is a nudge in the right direction, then most people should be able work out what works for them and what doesnt.

    BlueShift reckons there might be somthing happening with camber if you check out the camber theory thread.
     
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  22. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    No worries, feel free to copy and paste what ever
     
  23. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    we've all gotta start somewhere, right? I'll check that out now, thanks for the heads up
     
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  24. Zalym

    Zalym

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    Thank you very much for this. I've played GT in the past but never really delved into it deeply. I've found a few other guides that will be helpful as I figure things out but I've found that they quickly delve into the deeper stuff and I'm still floundering at the surface. However, this write-up is what I have been looking for the past couple of weeks - a guide that assumes no knowledge at all of tuning in GT and only a casual interest in racing or cars in the real world and goes on to say exactly what each choice does in very simplistic terms for those of us just starting to learn.

    In that vein (and I hope it is OK to ask these here its a tuning guide but I don't want to be thought of as hijacking it in anyway) using this guide and the others, what is the procedure or sequence for tuning cars, generally? I'll try to make my following example as concise as possible.

    1.) Let's say I want to make the car faster, pick any 'simple' car to tune. I've read 400pp FR cars are good places to start learning. So say I upgrade the engine first. Should I go ahead and buy the upgrades for the fully customizable parts (transmission, springs etc) as well as whatever exhaust, brakes I want at the same time and then start to tune it? I guess more concisely, how do I know what I should buy without overpowering the car to the point it becomes too hard to drive? Sorry that's a long question, hopefully it makes sense.

    2.) Once I buy the parts I need/want, what's the proper way to test the car? Find a speed you want, adjust the transmission first then customize each setting until it drives well? I'd assume all of this would all depend on what car/track you were driving with/on. Which leads to my last question.

    3.) Is there an efficient way to find a 'balanced' tune that would work well on most tracks to use as a starting point or is that really impossible because of the wide variations of tracks?

    Sorry for the long post, I'm just trying to wrap my head around all of this as a complete tuning noob and simple commuter driver in real life, thanks for any help and any extra advice you have that goes beyond what I've asked!
     
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  25. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    Right, a good place to start would be Mx5/Miata/Eunos Roadster (same car). This car responds really well to tuning and helps to illustrate what effect the changes you are making are having.
    When it comes to what parts you should buy it's a case of what do you want to do with the car? Do you have a PP/Bhp limit? How often are you going to use the car? How much are you going to win in the event you want to enter.

    Generally speaking, you want to be as close to the PP limit of the event, this will mean your car is likely to be on par with the performance of the other cars in the event.
    If you are only going to drive the car once or twice (seasonals etc.) don't spend tons of money on it, you'll never make it back. (spend 500k on buying and upgrading a car to only win 40k back is not a wise choice!)

    Tuning/Testing

    Step 1. Buy a car

    Step 2. Test drive car
    I'd recommend Deep Forest Raceway or Grand Valley Speedway, they have a large variety of bends and straights which allows you to see how the car handles/reacts. Do enough laps to get the feel of the car, don't just spin it at the first corner and say its broken! Drive until you have learned the car and the circuit, concentrate on what the car does well where it needs improvement.

    Step 3. Tuning the car
    My first step in tuning is to give it the basic upgrades- brakes/clutch/driveshaft/gearbox, this should knock a few seconds off your lap time straight away because it smooths out the basic functions and makes the car more responsive to acceleration/deceleration.

    Test again - Any improvement to lap time/performance?

    Step 3 - Adding performance
    If you decide the car need to be faster, my first point of call would be reducing the weight. This relates to the power to weight ratio which is extremely important in terms of performance. The less weight the motor has to drag around, the more efficient/fast the car will be. It also helps greatly with handling because it means there will be less mass to resist the effect of turning during corners. (this can also be used to effect the weight balance but i'll explain that later)

    Test again - Any improvement to lap time/performance?

    If you still want more power, start by adding the cheap bits (sports computer/catalytic converter/intake tuning). Be mindful when adding power, too much too soon can completely change how a car feels. Adding power may make the car faster in a straight line, but it can also encourage understeer/oversteer in the corners due to the increased forces on the suspension components.

    Test again - Any improvement to lap time/performance?

    Once you have got the power to where you want it, it is time to move on the suspension. I'm not going to write out exactly how I'd go about setting up a car, but I'll explain the basic ideas.

    Weight distribution - this is how much % of weight is over either end of the car

    Weight forward = understeer (car wants to go in a straight line instead of turning)
    Weight backwards = oversteer (heavy back end swings around like a pendulum when car is turning)

    Ideally you want the weight as close to the centre of the car as possible (achieved by adding and moving ballast) and as close to the ground as possible (ride height)

    This will give you a neutral (50/50) handling car which is generally the easiest to drive and the fastest.
    Now you can start playing with all the other bits mentione4d in the guide.



    The best way to know what a car can/can't handle is to try it. Make changes then test, its the only way of knowing.

    Pick a track that you are comfortable with and can lap consistently, there are only a few circuits that require specialist set ups, a setup that you are comfortable with will work reasonably well everywhere. You will only really need to adjust the gearing and that is simple enough.

    Simple Gearing Setup

    To keep it simple, test drive the track in question. Get a good run onto the straight carrying as much speed as you can, the ideal situation is having your top speed set at the speed you reach by the end of the straight, you want to be just hitting the rev limiter as you get to the braking point. That way your car is setup to be as fast as it needs to be. The basic rule is that the higher your top speed, the slower your acceleration or vice-versa. Theres no point setting your top speed at 200mph if the track only has a 500m straight because theres no real way you'll ever reach that speed, setting it too high will just hamper you around the rest of the track because of slow acceleration
    (note: if you are racing rather than doing a time trial, set the top speed a few mph higher to account for the effects of slipstreaming)


    So, to answer your original questions

    1. Testing is the only way to find out what a car is capable of
    2. Pick a track that you like driving and has a variety of curves/straights/incline. Keep driving it until you learn to lap it consistently, that is the only way to know if you're improving
    3. Yes, most tunes will work on most tracks. A simpler top speed adjustment is all that is required to suit long/short straights


    Make sure you are driving with all the active aids such as traction control, skid recovery force and active steering OFF during testing! Leave ABS at 1 though because it is pretty much essential to stop the brakes locking.


    hope this helped, feel free to ask any further questions
     
  26. Zalym

    Zalym

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    That helped a lot, thank you for the in-depth, straight-forward answer. I feel like I have a path forward now to play with and will give it a try this weekend. I'd use a pun about not spinning my wheels anymore but I don't want to wear out my welcome. ;) Thank you again.
     
  27. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    You're very welcome, glad I could help. You've got a lot to learn, but at least you know where to start now. Just remember to think about how the car and the suspension are working during a race, its easier to solve a problem if you know the cause.
    If you have any more questions, feel free to ask here or drop me a message
     
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  28. DolHaus

    DolHaus

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    -bump-
     
  29. mustangxr

    mustangxr

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    As an amateur tuner myself, one of the common blunders that I would get into was to change too many things at once. Lets say you have oversteer for instance, coming out of tight corners. Initially, I would go to the instructions like those above and change everything that precluded or cured oversteer. The problem with this shotgun approach is that you don't really learn anything. Oh sure, the corner exit oversteer may be gone, but which change was responsible?? The problem may have been LSD, or rear ride height, or rear spring rate, or....... To keep the learning curve going faster, just make one change at a time, then test the changed tune on your well known and familiar testing track. That way you will learn much easier how the different changes work. Sometimes, I will use Tsukuba for a quick test because it only takes a minute or so to get around it. Often, I will use a short race there to test small changes, that way, I get paid for testing!!

    Another learning tool is to utilize one of the best tuners on the board and print out the tune already done for you. Praiano comes to mind because (A) he is arguably the best tuner here, and (B) his tunes are mostly on a tuning sheet that is downloadable and printable. Mr.Praiano can tune a car to be faster and better than we ever can, and do it in the same time that you and I would use for the morning shave!! I have a sheaf of tunes printed out on 8.5 X 11 paper about 4 inches thick! Another aid in tuning is to download and printout the blank GT-6 tuning sheet and photostat a bunch of them. As you tune your first car, use a pencil and jot down your new settings. (pencil makes it easier to change) You can even have a separate sheet for the stock car and see how far you have modified it. As you go into the tuning page on the GT-6 site for the particular car, you will notice that there are 3 different tuning pages available for each car. (The tuning page selector is on the top left side) You can leave #1 tune stock if you want and use #2 as your modified tune. It's not so easy to compare these tunes as the printed ones though because you can only have one setup on the screen at one time.

    In Gt-5 there was a nice copy feature that allowed tuners to copy one tune to another page which could save time for a tweaked transmission setting so you didn't have to laboriously copy the gear ratios manually. Again the hard copy tuning sheet is helpfull for this transposing of transmission gear ratios. GT-6 does not have this feature yet?!?

    Speaking of transmission ratios, this is an essential tuning tool. For example, when tuning the venerable Eunos/Miata/MX5, one of the very first things to do (after lightening the car) is to tighten up the gear ratios. You don't have a lot of power here, but if you create a close ratio transmission, you will a least keep that little engine cooking on high burner all the time! There are lots of instructions on this Forum on how to do it. If you get a Praiano tune sheet and change your Miata to replicate his transmission you will be amazed at how much more power is available. Consider this; most manual transmissions on road cars are built for fuel mileage, not performance, and some companies use the manual tranny to get the whole spectrum of their vehicles into an improved EPA catagory. How they do that is to space out the gear ratios very wide so that the next gear is so far away that the engine is laboring to get back into the power zone after every shift???

    After the transmission gears are configured, the only thing you will need to change is the Final Gear ratio which will contol the top speed for the track you want to race on. Avoid using the top speed box to change the speed after tweaking the ratios or the tranny will basically revert to stock and you will have to start again.
    Hope all this helps, Mustangxr
     
  30. DolHaus

    DolHaus

    Messages:
    3,865
    Location:
    England
    @mustangxr
    Good points, well made.
    I would disagree with comparing tunes with the top tuners though, that encourages copying with no understanding. Also the fastest car may not be the right car for the user, I think it is important for people to tune to their abilities and driving style. It can kind of remove the incentive as well, if someone is tuning a car for a seasonal so they can achieve gold or improve their ranking then they will learn more than if they copy and paste someone elses tune.
    This said, thank you for your contribution, my knowledge of transmission tuning is limited and its nice to have a more thorough explanation.
    I miss the settings sheet duplication feature from GT5 as well, this new system needs patching.