Words I Hate

Discussion in 'The Rumble Strip' started by Liquid, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. milefile

    milefile

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    When people say "melk" instead of milk and "pellow" instead of pillow. Seems to happen in families where they all do it. It makes me irrationally angry.

    Also people calling soda "pop" even though I grew up calling it pop.
     
  2. milefile

    milefile

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    In America they are just called billionaires.
     
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  3. GTV0819

    GTV0819 (Banned)

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    Because that's a first world term. :lol:
     
  4. Pupik

    Pupik Staff Emeritus

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    I would like to go into a tirade about parents that still use baby-talk to their younger children. Saying "milkie" for milk or "snacky" for snack is not helping them develop linguistic skills.

    But we've also become a culture that can't adult anymore, so the loop is now closed.
     
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  5. TexRex

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    "Adult"...used as a verb.
     
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  6. Pupik

    Pupik Staff Emeritus

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    You found the message in the battle.
     
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  7. Liquid

    Liquid Premium

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    pressurise, v.

    When used in the sense of applying pressure instead of creating pressure. You pressurise a sealed compartment such as a flightdeck; you cannot pressurise a person unless you're Milton Krest in Licence To Kill.

    It seems to be very common in police shows:

    "You pressurised him into making that statement!"
    vs
    "You pressured him into making that statement!"

    Pressure is the correct verb in this context, thank you.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2020
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  8. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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    :crazy:

    None come to mind at the moment, but I've been struck by examples of people having been compelled to verbify words that are already sufficiently verbed.
     
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  9. Liquid

    Liquid Premium

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    Verbalize. ;)
     
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  10. W3HS

    W3HS Premium

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    I like to use “monk” as a verb for when monks come “monking” at my school.

    “The monks are coming monking today.”

    “What will they do?”

    “Monk.”
     
  11. MaxAttack

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    You wouldn't like the Netherlands then.
     
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  12. MatskiMonk

    MatskiMonk

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    Just sitting here 'monking.
     
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  13. W3HS

    W3HS Premium

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    How many people need to use the term before it makes it into the dictionary?
     
  14. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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    Yes.
     
  15. CTznOfTime

    CTznOfTime

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    This is the thread for words we hate... not words we like....

    ... unless you still hate the word "monk", and yet you like to use it...

    Please clarify...
     
  16. MaxAttack

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    Well, his post does relate to the ones above it, where people are discussing how annoying it is when people make unnecessary verbs or verbify words that are already verbs.

    I also don't see this thread as needing such Draconian enforcement of its title. Harmless post from @W3HS.
     
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  17. W3HS

    W3HS Premium

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    I’m aware of the thread title. It’s been around a while.

    I don’t necessarily like “monking” nor hate it. It’s just a phrase I use.
     
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  18. Jimlaad43

    Jimlaad43 Premium

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    [​IMG]
    This has two "a"s in it. Car-a-mel. I hate hearing it pronounced car-mel.
     
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  19. W3HS

    W3HS Premium

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    Water also has a “t” in it, but our American cousins seem to overlook that.

    However, in their defence (should I do this?) I do pronounce tons of words “incorrectly” because of my London/ British accent; garage, anything with “ass” in it, schedule, anything with an “er” that becomes an “a” sound, etc.
     
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  20. Jimlaad43

    Jimlaad43 Premium

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    Correction, American's often pronounce it like a "d" sound. Where it's ignored is Northern England, where it often just becomes an apostrophe.
     
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  21. TexRex

    TexRex Premium

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  22. W3HS

    W3HS Premium

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    Anecdote: a student of mine, half English, half Thai, under my tuition, had been taught correctly. When she said “water bottle” to an American colleague of mine he had to ask a few times as to what she was saying.
     
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  23. Pupik

    Pupik Staff Emeritus

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    Verbing weirds language.

    I suppose you can reverb an adverb by making it an all-new verb, or a gerund. Would "qualifying" qualify?

    That's commonly found in the northeastern US accent. This is one word where southern accents get it right (unlike "pin" and "pen" and many other words with like vowel sounds). I tend to think "wudder" it gets more noticeable as you head further northeastern, but less so going a bit to the west (say, over the Allegheny and Adrirondack Ranges).

    It's only a problem where something sounds like another common word; to that end, there aren't many words that sound like "water" or "wudder". (Except maybe rudder.)
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
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  24. TexRex

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    "Underappreciated" and similar. It seems they're just code for "not enough people like what I like".
     
  25. W3HS

    W3HS Premium

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    That word is so... not loved enough?
     
  26. CLowndes888

    CLowndes888

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    Empowerment.
     
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  27. Warruz

    Warruz

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    "hubby" just makes me feel physically sick. lots of other words too that end in that sound as well.... "prezzie" or "veggie" too. just sounds dumb.
     
  28. TexRex

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    Heighth.
     
  29. Liquid

    Liquid Premium

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    What is this?
     
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  30. Barra333

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    Refers to the height of the eighth object in a series. :dopey:
     
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