2019 Kia Forte

Discussion in 'Auto News' started by R1600Turbo, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. FT-1

    FT-1 Premium

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    There is the Genesis G70, but unfortunately that's not sold in the UK.
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    It's a segment size below the Stinger so it is a more direct competitor to something like a BMW 340i.
     
  2. 05XR8

    05XR8

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    Oof. Those slits-openings-angles along with the number plate, are ruining a nice, beefy looking car.
     
  3. Jmac279

    Jmac279

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    Only one engine option (147 hp Atkinson Cycle 2.0L I4), manual only available on lowest trim, rear torsion beam suspension = complete loss of interest from me

    Do other countries get interesting versions of this?
     
  4. R1600Turbo

    R1600Turbo Premium

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    The GT I just posted is 1.6 turbo, DCT (and hopefully 6MT) and multi-link rear.
     
  5. homeforsummer

    homeforsummer Premium

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    In the UK at least Kia/Hyundai are two of the few manufacturers that offer multi-link across the range in this market segment. Not even Mercedes does that with the A-class!

    People make far too big a deal about torsion beam rear ends though. It might be valid if Renault and Peugeot hadn't spent most of the last 30 years or more making better handling front-drive cars than just about anyone else, despite using torsion beams. The rear end in a front-drive car is just being dragged about the place anyway...

    Full disclosure: the best-handling front-drive car I've ever driven did have an independent rear end, admittedly (the DC2 Integra R). But the difference to the next-best I've driven (mostly Renaults - Clio 200 Cup, Clio 182 Trophy, Megane R26.R, but also the current 208/308 Peugeot Sport GTIs) is so small I'm not sure it makes a great deal of difference in that class of car. All of the above drive better than any of their independently-suspended rivals of their respective eras.

    At least when the car is light. It probably starts to make more of a difference in porky 1400kg-plus modern hot hatches. But I'd not dismiss something entirely based on its rear suspension, is more the point I'm getting at.
     
  6. R1600Turbo

    R1600Turbo Premium

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    One of the main reasons I bought the Elantra Sport was the multi-link rear. For what I had planned for the car it was a must. But for the every day A to B person, it doesn't really matter.
     
  7. Eunos_Cosmo

    Eunos_Cosmo

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    What I remember about the old Hondas (haven't driven an Elantra sport) with their 5-link rear suspension is that they handled very well while simultaneously delivering a pleasant/non-harsh ride. I believe this is because a multi-link enables you to run somewhat softer springs and dampers without worrying about significant dynamic camber changes like you would have in a strut setup. Granted, a torsion beam is something else entirely, and I don't know enough about them to say what their dynamic characteristics are, but I know that Ford (for instance) uses an extremely firm rear spring/damper on the Fiesta ST to achieve it's handling characteristics. Riding in the back seat of one makes this apparent. My RX-7 handles fairly well for what it is (solid rear axle with a Watts link), but as soon as you get onto a rough road surface, the back end starts to skip around. I never noticed anything like that on my Mazda2, but that had pretty soft suspension.
     
  8. homeforsummer

    homeforsummer Premium

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    I'm not sure there's a fundamental difference in ride quality either - it seems to be more about tuning, and the more I think about it, the amount of weight you're trying to control with the suspension you have. The aforementioned Renaults and Peugeots don't just handle well but ride well too, but none are excessively heavy. Most modern hot hatchbacks on the other hand are probably in the 1300-1500kg range and I expect there comes a point where if you want a certain level of body control then you aren't going to get it without big ride (and possibly geometry) compromises with a torsion beam.

    A case in point might be the FK2 > FK8 Civic R transition, which went from a torsion beam to multi-link, and doesn't just handle better but rides better too. But that's a difficult one to call because the FK8 is also a lighter platform, with a longer wheelbase, wider track and lower centre of gravity - and that combination is also good for ride quality because all of it means you can run lower spring and damper rates (or softer settings for adaptive dampers) without compromising handling.

    Wide and long for its height with a low CoG and low weight are one of the reasons an Elise rides so well too... though there you're also getting into the realms of not requiring sway bars and that also has benefits...

    I do know the independent EP3 Civic R rode better than the torsion beam FN2 (both in reviews and from experience), so maybe there's truth in the ride thing for Honda specifically. Though the EP3 doesn't come anywhere near those torsion beam Renaults and Peugeots in terms of handling or ride... (nor indeed a DC2 Integra).

    I don't know why the Fiesta is so firm (the new one is not quite as bad, but close), but then at ~1200kg it's fairly heavy for a car of its size, and it's also relatively tall too. I've driven the last three generations of Renault Sport Clio and all ride better than the ST!

    TL;DR - it's a fascinating but complicated subject.
     
  9. R1600Turbo

    R1600Turbo Premium

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  10. -Fred-

    -Fred- Staff Emeritus

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    I quite like that, it looks pretty nice. Well, aside from the horrible wheels.
     
  11. 05XR8

    05XR8

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    I saw the GT Line being offered on lesser models as well. Good move.
     
  12. RocZX

    RocZX Premium

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    Forte5 GT
     
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  13. R1600Turbo

    R1600Turbo Premium

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  14. TonyJZX

    TonyJZX

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    We have the sedan and hatch and the GT here.

    The sedan is generally a bust... small sedans arent popular at all.

    The hatch is almost a sportback thing so its bigger than a normal hatch (like an i30) but not as big as a true small wagon like a VW Golf Sportwagon.

    The GT is the same 150kW motor recycled in other Korean models. Also the 2.0 std. PFI motor is what it is.
     
  15. R1600Turbo

    R1600Turbo Premium

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    The GT's are starting to show up at dealers in the US, even though Kia has yet to add the 2020 Forte to their website. (they did release pricing though)

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  16. 88GTA

    88GTA Premium

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    7 speed DCT, sport suspension, sport exhaust, and a turbo for the same price as my base model Mazda 6? Well played Kia. :tup:
     
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  17. mustafur

    mustafur

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    I'm seeing the Hatchback/Shooting brake thing everywhere here, not many Sedans though, makes sense though the Hatch looks like much more car and looks really good in GT trim.
     
  18. 05XR8

    05XR8

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    At night, those rear lights on the hatch make it look high class.
     
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